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June 30, 2009

Article of Interest: "Can't Buy Me Love"

An interesting article came out that unfortunately seems to be available only on Lexis or Westlaw. But the article is: Aly Parker, Can't Buy Me Love: Funding Marriage Promotion Versus Listening to Real Needs in Breaking the Cycle of Poverty. 18 S. Cal. Rev. L. & Soc. Just. 493 (2009). -E.R. [email protected]

June 30, 2009 in Books/Articles/Reports of Interest | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 28, 2009

Northeast People of Color Conference 2009: America's New Class Warfare?

From the Legal Scholarship Blog:

The Northeast People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference (NEPOC) 2009 will take place October 23-25 at the University at Buffalo Law School in Buffalo, New York.

During last year’s NEPOC, we experienced the monumental collapse of Lehman Brothers and subsequently, our financial and real estate sectors. Our nation and economy have been suffering since that time and there have been many interesting changes. This year our theme is “America’s New Class Warfare?”

For more details on the theme, please see the conference webpage

Instead of relying solely on invitations, this year’s NEPOC will also do a call for papers for the plenary panels. In addition, we are seeking works in progress, leaders for professional development workshops and nominees for the Haywood Burns – Shanara Gilbert Awards. The deadline for the submission of all these materials is June 30th.

-E.R. [email protected]

June 28, 2009 in Conferences and Calls for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 25, 2009

New York Times Article on Microloans and Training

Story of interest:

-E.R. [email protected]

June 25, 2009 in News Coverage of Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 24, 2009

Article of Interest: "The Ethics of Poverty Tourism"

This blog has done a number of posts on poverty tourism or related activities (the debate over Slumdog Millionaire) and a new paper of interest tackles this head on: Evan Selinger & Kevin Outterson, The Ethics of Poverty Tourism (BU School of Law Working Paper No. 09-29).  The abstract is below:

Poverty tours - actual visits as well as literary and cinematic versions - are characterized as morally controversial trips and condemned in the press as voyeuristic endeavors. In this collaborative essay, we draw from personal experience, legal expertise, and phenomenological philosophy and introduce a conceptual taxonomy that clarifies the circumstances in which observing others has been construed as an immoral use of the gaze. We appeal to this taxonomy to determine which observational circumstances are relevant to the poverty tourism debate. While we do not defend all or even most poverty tourism practices, we do conclude that categorical condemnation of poverty tourism is unjustified.


-Thanks to Susan Bennett for the heads up!  E.R. [email protected]

June 24, 2009 in Books/Articles/Reports of Interest | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 21, 2009

(My) Parody Article

Excuse the self-promoting aspect of this posting!  My parody article has been published.  The article is about becoming a professor but might be of interest to readers of this blog because it includes a lengthy section on class and the legal academy (the section of the paper entitled "learning to like brie").  The article is: Ezra Rosser, On Becoming "Professor": A Semi Serious Look in the Mirror, 36 Fl. St. Univ. L. Rev. 215 (2009) and can be found on SSRN.

-E.R. [email protected]

June 21, 2009 in Books/Articles/Reports of Interest | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 18, 2009

Article of Interest: "Freedom, Want and Economic and Social Rights: Frame and Law"

Katherine Young has posted "Freedom, Want and Economic and Social Rights: Frame and Law" 24 Maryland J. of Int. L. 176 (2009) to SSRN.  Abstract below:

In 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognized the aspiration for everyone to enjoy freedom from want and particular economic and social rights. Sixty years after the proclamation of the Universal Declaration, it is important to review its meaning and its effects in the context of significantly different legal, political, economic and cultural landscapes. To approach this task, this article employs the unusual device of considering a Norman Rockwell painting of "Freedom from Want". This painting, well-known in the United States, responded to the local wartime political culture, and depicted the private enjoyment of material security in patriarchal, consumerist and culturally uniform terms. This article employs the themes made evident in the painting to underscore the assumptions made in the text of the Universal Declaration. Having outlined this reading, it suggests an alternative framework for understanding economic and social rights. Firstly, economic and social rights provide an important frame around redistributive contestations that strive for universalism in expression and the location of institutional responsibility in response. Secondly, economic and social rights ground legal norms, which are in some cases enforceable and in others available to exert a different kind of pressure on legal decision-makers. As frame and as law, economic and social rights provide an important pragmatic justification for the Universal Declaration's continuing relevance.

-E.R. [email protected]

June 18, 2009 in Books/Articles/Reports of Interest | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

June 14, 2009

Barbara Ehrenreich on the focus on the new poor vs the already poor in the recession

An Op-Ed of interest that I was happy to see, having read too many stories of the ultrarich becoming the merely rich -- I just finished Roger Lowenstein's When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management (2000) (a cautionary story about the rise of leverage, new-fangled investment forms, and loose regulation). 

-E.R. [email protected]

June 14, 2009 in News Coverage of Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 13, 2009

Article of Interest: "No Way Out: An Analysis of Exit Processes for Gang Injunctions"

Lindsay Crawford, "No Way Out: An Analysis of Exit Processes for Gang Injunctions," 97 Cal. L. Rev. 161 (2009).  An explanation of the gang injuctions from the article: "gang injunctions restrict the activities of named gang members in a variety ways, often by prohibiting gang members from associating with one another, wearing gangrelated clothing, or from appearing in specified places and conducting certain activities."  The focus is on the need to have mechanisms to exit such injunctions. 

-E.R. [email protected]

June 13, 2009 in Books/Articles/Reports of Interest | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 12, 2009

Cornell Law Review issue on Property and Obligation

Quite interesting Cornell Law Review issue:

-E.R. [email protected]

June 12, 2009 in Books/Articles/Reports of Interest | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 11, 2009

Call for Papers from Journal of Affordable Housing & Community Development Law

From the Legal Scholarship Blog:

The Journal of Affordable Housing & Community Development Law, the legal publication of the American Bar Association’s Forum on Affordable Housing and Community Development Law, is currently seeking submissions from students, professors, and practitioners. The Journal publishes full-length articles, book reviews, and shorter commentaries on a wide range of affordable housing and community and economic development issues.

The Fall 2009 issue will focus on “Housing and Community Development in the Economic Crisis.” Submissions of papers or proposals for papers should be e-mailed to Paulette Williams at [email protected] no later than June 15, 2009.

Writer’s guidelines can be found here.

-E.R. [email protected]

June 11, 2009 in Conferences and Calls for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 10, 2009

Labor Organizer and Immigrant Rights Center First Person Account in New York Times

An interesting article: Elena Herrada, "We Came to Work," New York Times, June 9, 2009.

Also of note, a story about the decline of Big Law: Alan Feuer, "A Study in Why Major Law Firms Are Shrinking," New York Times, June 5, 2009. 

-E.R. [email protected]

June 10, 2009 in News Coverage of Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 7, 2009

New Issue of Pathways: Going Global: Antipoverty Lessons from Around the World

Spring_2009_cover_214px_274px The Spring issue of Pathways, the poverty, inequality, and social policy magazine of The Stanford Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality, has now been published.  The issue (full PDF available here) includes:

Editors' Note by David Grusky and Christopher Wimer

TRENDS
Getting to Equal: Progress, Pitfalls, and Policy Solutions on the Road to Gender Parity in the Workplace
Have we "stalled out" in the historic march toward gender equality in the workplace? Pamela Stone weighs the evidence and makes the case for a new way forward.

RESEARCH IN BRIEF
New research developments
A surprising trend in wealth inequality, the biological determinants of poor children's academic performance, the long-term effects of job displacement, and other cutting-edge research.

GOING GLOBAL: ANTIPOVERTY LESSONS FROM AROUND THE WORLD
Flexicurity
Joshua Cohen and Charles Sabel argue that the time has come to build a 21st century labor market modeled on key principles of Denmark's "flexicurity" system.
Pro-Poor Stimulus: Lessons from the Developing World
Martin Ravallion looks to antipoverty programs in developing countries to understand how developed nations like the United States can provide stimulus while reducing long-term poverty.
Combating Poverty by Building Assets: Lessons from Around the World
Ray Boshara describes the key features of asset-building programs throughout the world and examines how the United States can apply them to achieve economic security for the poor.
Northern Exposure: Learning from Canada�s Response to Winner-Take-All Inequality
Jacob S. Hacker describes how the United States and Canada have taken two different roads and why the Canadian road provides lessons that the United States might take to heart.

INTERVENTIONS
Spotlight On...Growing Power and the Urban Farming Movement
In our new "Spotlight On" feature, we talk with Growing Power's Will and Erika Allen about the potential and future of urban agriculture in combating poverty

-E.R. [email protected]
NOTE: I am teaching in my law school's Chile Summer Program (my photos here) and for that reason have had few posts and will probably continue to for two more weeks. 

June 7, 2009 in Books/Articles/Reports of Interest | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 1, 2009

Call for Papers from The Scholar: St. Mary’s Law Review on Minority Issues

The Scholar: St. Mary’s Law Review on Minority Issues is soliciting articles for upcoming volumes. Our publication is committed to raising the awareness of those individuals in our society who traditionally have been voiceless. The Scholar furthers legal discourse on issues that concern race, ethnicity, class, religion, gender, and sexual identity, as well as other countless groups in our society. Accordingly, we will consider any article that focuses on a legal issue of concern to disenfranchised groups.

We are currently looking for articles to begin editing on June 29, 2009.  Accordingly, we would need to have a version to review by June 17.  Any author extended an offer would be published by August 3, 2009.  Additional information regarding The Scholar may be found at The Scholar's website. 

Thank you for your consideration. We look forward to hearing from you.  Elizabeth Kaigh, Executive Articles Editor, The Scholar: St. Mary’s Law Review on Minority Issues, [email protected]

June 1, 2009 in Conferences and Calls for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack