Tuesday, November 15, 2016

New Issue of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly

5.coverVolume 45, Issue 5 of the Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly is now available. Here is the table of contents:

Editorial

  • Chao GuoAngela Biesand Susan Phillips, From the Editors’ Desk 

Articles

  • Christopher R. Prentice, Understanding Nonprofit Financial Health: Exploring the Effects of Organizational and Environmental Variables
  • Chris Cornforth and Rob Macmillan, Evolution in Board Chair–CEO Relationships: A Negotiated Order Perspective
  • Ana Isabel Gil-LacruzCarmen Marcuello-Servósand María Isabel Saz-Gil, Youth Volunteering in Countries in the European Union: Approximation to Differences
  • Eike Emrich and Christian Pierdzioch, The Internet and the Commitment of Volunteers: Empirical Evidence for the Red Cross
  • Frank L. Samson, Perceived Group Competition and Charitable Giving: Racial Prejudice Affect as a Mediating Factor 

Research Note

  • Jesse Lecy and Jeremy Thornton, What Big Data Can Tell Us About Government Awards to the Nonprofit Sector: Using the FAADS 

Book Reviews

  • Joannie Tremblay-Boire, Book Review: Challenging the third sector: Global prospects for active citizenship by S. Kenny, M. Taylor, J. Onyx & M. Mayo and The NGO challenge for international relations theory edited by W. E. DeMars & D. Dijkzeul
  • Elizabeth Rowen, Book Review: The nonprofit world: Civil society and the rise of the nonprofit sector by J. Casey
  • Salvatore P. Alaimo, Book Review: Faculty work and the public good by G. G. Shaker

Lloyd Mayer

November 15, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

New Issue of VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations

6Volume 27, Issue 6 (December 2016) of VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations is now available. Here is the table of contents:

  • Disentangling the Financial Vulnerability of Nonprofits
    Pablo de Andres-Alonso, Inigo Garcia-Rodriguez & M. Elena Romero-Merino
  • Exploring the Nexus of Nonprofit Financial Stability and Financial Growth
    Grace L. Chikoto-Schultz & Daniel Gordon Neely
  • Doing Well by Returning to the Origin. Mission Drift, Outreach and Financial Performance of Microfinance Institutions
    Matteo Pedrini & Laura Maria Ferri
  • Funding and Financial Regulation for Third Sector Broadcasters: What Can Be Learned From the Australian and Canadian Experiences?
    Fernando Méndez Powell
  • Funding Civil Society? Bilateral Government Support for Development NGOs
    David Suárez & Mary Kay Gugerty
  • Resource Dependence In Non-profit Organizations: Is It Harder To Fundraise If You Diversify Your Revenue Structure?
    Ignacio Sacristán López de los Mozos, Antonio Rodríguez Duarte & Óscar Rodríguez Ruiz
  • Resisting Hybridity in Community-Based Third Sector Organisations in Aotearoa New Zealand
    Jenny Aimers & Peter Walker
  • NPO Financial Statement Quality: An Empirical Analysis Based on Benford’s Law
    Tom Van Caneghem
  • A Review of Research on Nonprofit Communications from Mission Statements to Annual Reports
    Lawrence Souder
  • NGOs in the News: The Road to Taken-for-Grantedness
    Angela Marberg, Hans van Kranenburg & Hubert Korzilius
  • Understanding Contemporary Challenges to INGO Legitimacy: Integrating Top-Down and Bottom-Up Perspectives
    Oliver Edward Walton, Thomas Davies, Erla Thrandardottir & Vincent Charles Keating
  • Sensegiving, Leadership, and Nonprofit Crises: How Nonprofit Leaders Make and Give Sense to Organizational Crisis
    Curt A. Gilstrap, Cristina M. Gilstrap, Kendra Nigel Holderby & Katrina Maria Valera
  • Organizational Crisis Resistance: Examining Leadership Mental Models of Necessary Practices to Resist Crises and the Role of Organizational Context
    Jurgen Willems
  • Ideology, Practice, and Process? A Review of the Concept of Managerialism in Civil Society Studies
    Johan Hvenmark
  • Toward More Targeted Capacity Building: Diagnosing Capacity Needs Across Organizational Life Stages
    Fredrik O. Andersson, Lewis Faulk & Amanda J. Stewart
  • Dimensions of Capacity in Nonprofit Human Service Organizations
    William A. Brown, Fredrik O. Andersson & Suyeon Jo
  • The Effect of Attitudinal and Behavioral Commitment on the Internal Assessment of Organizational Effectiveness: A Multilevel Analysis
    Patrick Valeau, Jurgen Willems & Hassen Parak
  • Testing an Economic Model of Nonprofit Growth: Analyzing the Behaviors and Decisions of Nonprofit Organizations, Private Donors, and Governments
    You Hyun Kim & Seok Eun Kim
  • Book Review, David Fishel: The Book of the Board: Effective Governance for Non-profit Organisations (3rd edition)
    Chris Cornforth
  • Book Review, Block, Stephen R.: Social Work and Boards of Directors: The Relationship Model
    Raquel Rego
  • Book Review, Judith McMorland, Ljiljana Eraković, Stepping Through Transitions: Management, Leadership & Governance in Not-for-Profit Organisations
    Dyana P. Mason
  • Erratum to: Dependent Interdependence: The Complicated Dance of Government–Nonprofit Relations in China
    Zhang Yuanfeng
  • Erratum to: Institutional Variation Among Russian Regional Regimes: Implications for Social Policy and the Development of Non-governmental Organizations
    Thomas F. Remington
  • Erratum to: Modernizing State Support of Nonprofit Service Provision: The Case of Kyrgyzstan
    Yulia Shapovalova
  • Erratum to: France: A Late-Comer to Government–Nonprofit Partnership
    Edith Archambault
  • Erratum to: New Winds of Social Policy in the East
    Linda J. Cook
  • Erratum to: The Long-Term Evolution of the Government–Third Sector Partnership in Italy: Old Wine in a New Bottle?
    Costanzo Ranci
  • Erratum to: Poland: A New Model of Government–Nonprofit Relations for the East?
    Sławomir Nałęcz, Ewa Leś & Bartosz Pieliński

Lloyd Mayer

November 15, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Backer: Commentary on the New Charity Undertakings Law (China)

Backer (1)Larry Catá Backer (Pennsylvania State University) has posted Commentary on the New Charity Undertakings Law: Socialist Modernization Through Collective Organizations, The China Non Profit Law Review (Tsinghua University) (forthcoming 2016). Here is the abstract:

China’s new Charity Law represents the culmination of over a decade of planning for the appropriate development of the productive forces of the charity sector in aid of socialist modernization. Together with the related Foreign NGO Management Law, it represents an important advance in the organization of the civil society sector within emerging structures of Socialist Rule of Law principles. While both Charity and Foreign NGO Management Laws could profitably be considered as parts of a whole, each merits discussion for its own unique contribution to national development. One can understand, both the need to manage Chinese civil society within the context of charity ideals, and the need to constrain foreign non-governmental organizations to ensure national control over its own development. Moreover, the decision to invite global comment also evidenced Chinese understanding of the global ramifications of its approach to the management of its civil society, and its importance in the global discourse about consensus standards for that management among states. This becomes more important as Chinese civil society try to emerge onto the world stage. This essay considers the role of the Charity Law in advancing Socialist Modernization through the realization of the Chinese Communist Party(CCP) Basic Line. The essay is organized as follows: Section II considers the specific provisions of the Charity Law, with some reference to changes between the first draft and the final version of the Charity Law. Section III then considers some of the more theoretical considerations that suggest a framework for understanding the great contribution of the Charity Law as well as the challenges that remain for the development of the productive forces of the civil society sector at this historical stage of China’s development.

Lloyd Mayer

November 15, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Chan: The Function (or Malfunction) of Equity in the Charity Law of Canada's Federal Courts

Chan-profileKathryn Chan (University of Victoria) has posted (on SSRN) The Function (or Malfunction) of Equity in the Charity Law of Canada's Federal Courts, 2 Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law 33 (2016). Here is the abstract:

This essay explores what, if anything, it means for the Federal Court of Appeal to be a “court of equity” in the exercise of its jurisdiction over matters related to charitable registration under the Income Tax Act. The equitable jurisdiction over charities encompasses a number of curative principles, which the Court of Chancery traditionally invoked to save indefinite or otherwise defective charitable gifts. The author identifies some of these equitable principles and contemplates how their invocation might have altered the course of certain unsuccessful charitable registration appeals. She then considers the principal arguments for and against the Federal Court of Appeal applying these equitable principles when adjudicating matters related to registered charity status.

Lloyd Mayer

November 15, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Erie: Sharia, Charity, and Minjian Autonomy in Muslim China

ErieMatthew S. Erie (Oxford) has posted (on SSRN) Sharia, Charity, and Minjian Autonomy in Muslim China: Gift Giving in a Plural World, 43 American Ethnologist 311 (2016). Here is the abstract:

In Marcel Mauss's analysis, the gift exists in the context of a homogenous system of values. But in fact, different types of normative systems can inhabit the same social field. This is the case among Hui, the largest Muslim minority group in China, for whom the “freedom” of the gift resides in the giver's capacity to follow the rules underlying gifting, in this case, the rules of sharia. I call this capacity “minjian (unofficial, popular) autonomy.” Hui follow sharia in pursuit of a good life, but their practices are also informed by mainstream Han Chinese gift practices and by the anxieties of the security state. In their gifting practices, Hui thus endeavor to reconcile the demands of Islamic, postsocialist, and gift economies.

Lloyd Mayer

November 15, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, November 14, 2016

Akins: A Non-Profit's Right to Withhold Information from State Regulators

Bakins1Benjamin W. Akins (Georgia Gwinnett College School of Business) has posted State of Confusion: A Non-Profit's Right to Withhold Information from State Regulators on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

A tempest is brewing, and the non-profit community is sounding an alarm. What started as a simple overlooked regulatory requirement has blossomed into a battlefield as Federal circuits from east to west are weighing the breadth of power state regulators may wield when dealing with charities. The trouble started when some states made the bold move to start enforcing their existing laws. More specifically, the Attorneys General in New York and California started requiring non-profits to disclose the identity of their donors before allowing solicitation activities to occur.

Initially, two organizations filed suit to enjoin the states from collecting their donor information. The charities argued that being compelled to disclose this information would result in a chilling effect, reasoning that donors would shy away from making contributions, which would cause the charities to lose support. Early on in the litigation, courts held that the states had every right to the charities’ donor information and denied injunctive relief.

Then a third organization joined the fray with a similar plan, but in the midst of a wending judicial path, a different course was forged. The organization was granted a full trial and walked away with a win on the merits. While this signaled a temporary change in fortunes for the affected charities, the inconsistent judicial results have left all parties with more uncertainty than when they began. Now, this nascent line of jurisprudence is muddled, and it is up to either the courts or Congress to bring resolution and consistency to this sensitive Constitutional issue.

Lloyd Mayer

November 14, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Frye: Art & the "Public Trust" in Municipal Bankruptcy

BrianFryeBrian L. Frye (University of Kentucky), a contributing editor to this blog, has posted Art & the "Public Trust" in Municipal Bankruptcy, University of Detroit Mercy Law Review (forthcoming). Here is the abstract:

In 2013, the City of Detroit filed the largest municipal bankruptcy action in United States history, affecting about $20 billion in municipal debt. Unusually, Detroit owned its municipal art museum, the Detroit Institute of Arts (“DIA”) and all of the works of art in the DIA collection, which were potentially worth billions of dollars. Detroit’s creditors wanted Detroit to sell the DIA art in order to satisfy its debts. Key to the confirmation of Detroit’s plan of adjustment was the DIA settlement, under which Detroit agreed to sell the DIA art to the DIA corporation in exchange for $816 million over 20 years.

The bankruptcy court approved the DIA settlement as fair and in the best interests of the creditors because it found that Detroit could not, would not, and should not sell the DIA art. The bankruptcy court’s conclusion that Detroit could not sell the DIA art was wrong. It could and did sell the DIA art. But the bankruptcy court’s effective conclusion that Detroit was free to sell the DIA art on its own terms was correct.

The Detroit bankruptcy and DIA settlement suggest that art museums should be permitted and even encouraged to sell works of art in order to preserve the rest of their collections and continue operations. Professional standards that prohibit art museums from selling works of art for any purpose other than purchasing works of art are unjustified and should be abandoned.

 Lloyd Mayer

November 14, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Galle: An Empirical Examination of Nonprofit Agency Costs

Galle-web (1)Brian Galle (Georgetown) has posted Valuing the Right to Sue: An Empirical Examination of Nonprofit Agency Costs on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

Do stakeholder suits against managers reduce agency costs? I examine this question using a large panel of private foundation tax returns, together with hand-collected data on state-law variations in the right of donors to sue wayward nonprofit managers. In both difference-in-differences and triple-difference estimations, I find on average that standing to sue substantially increases donations and reduces the share of firm expenses devoted to administrative costs among private foundations. These outcomes are robust to other estimating strategies, such as propensity-score matching and regression adjustment with inverse probability weights. Coefficients are smaller and less precise among large operating charities. I argue that my results weigh in favor of expanded donor standing to sue, at least for foundations. My findings also suggest that the agency costs of philanthropic organizations are substantial, which has implications for, among other policy debates, tax policies that encourage perpetual-lived philanthropy.

Lloyd Mayer

November 14, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Shireman: Public and Nonprofit Higher Education as Optimal Second-Best

Shireman-2Robert Shireman (The Century Foundation) has published Public and Nonprofit Higher Education as the Optimal Second-Best, 76 Public Administration Review 758 (2016). Here are the first two paragraphs:

A reporter who covers Wall Street recently asked me whether the for-profit college industry has hit bottom yet. She meant the stock price, but my mind went immediately to the predatory behavior—aggressive and misleading marketing and low-quality programs leading hundreds of thousands of students into crippling debt—that has plagued the industry. Those egregious practices were at their worst precisely when the stock prices of for-profit colleges were at their highest. And therein lies the market failure that burdens for-profit higher education: While in other industries consumer value and shareholder value can move in tandem, with products and services like education, the guiding light of the enterprise—the stock price—can lead to the worst outcomes for students.

Education exhibits a problem known as contract failure, in which the buyer cannot reliably evaluate the quality of the promised or provided product or service. As a consequence, profit maximization fails to produce optimal outcomes because the profit-seekers’ drive to overpromise and underdeliver is rewarded rather than punished by the market, causing other firms to emulate the bad behavior. The problem becomes particularly severe if the firms target the least sophisticated or most desperate customers, those who are least able to evaluate the quality of the service provided. Contract failure is common in enterprises with ambiguous goals like building character, developing critical thinking skills, or spiritual fulfillment, or in industries involving vulnerable populations like children (schools) and the elderly (nursing homes).

Lloyd Mayer

November 14, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Smith: The Need for a Uniform Nonprofit Limited Liability Company Act

Kenya SmithKenya J.H. Smith (Arizona Summit) has published Charitable Choice: The Need for a Uniform Nonprofit Limited Liability Company Act (UNLLCA), 49 University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform 405 (2016). Here is the abstract:

Uniform laws serve an important role in our society, balancing state autonomy and the need to provide consistent solutions to common problems among the states. The Uniform Law Commission (ULC) is the preeminent authority that promulgates uniform laws. To date, the ULC has promulgated over 150 uniform and model acts. ULC tackles a wide array of issues, including child custody and protection, probate, electronic records, and commercial law. The ULC aims to “provide[ ] states with non-partisan, well-conceived and well-drafted legislation that brings clarity and stability to critical areas of state statutory law.”

Lloyd Mayer

November 14, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tremblay-Boire et al.: Monitoring and Sanctioning in Nonprofit Accountability Clubs

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Joannie Tremblay-Boire
 (Georgia State University Andrew Young School of Policy Studies), Aseem Prakash (University of Washington Political Science), and Mary Kay Gugerty (University of Washington Evans School of Public Policy & Governance) have published Regulation by Regulation: Monitoring and Sanctioning in Nonprofit Accountability Clubs, 76 Public Administration Review 712 (2016). Here is the abstract:

Nonprofits seek to enhance their reputation for responsible management by joining voluntary regulation mechanisms such as accountability clubs. Because external stakeholders cannot fully observe nonprofits’ compliance with club obligations, clubs incorporate mechanisms to monitor compliance and impose sanctions. Yet including monitoring and sanctioning mechanisms increases the cost of club membership for nonprofits. What factors account for the variation in the strength of monitoring and sanctioning mechanisms in voluntary accountability clubs? An analysis of 224 clubs suggests that stringent monitoring and sanctioning mechanisms are more likely in fund-raising-focused clubs, clubs that offer certification (as opposed to only outlining a code of conduct), and clubs with greater longevity. The macro context in which clubs function also shapes their institutional design: clubs in OECD countries and clubs with global membership are less likely to incorporate monitoring and sanctioning mechanisms than clubs in non-OECD countries and single-country clubs, respectively.

Lloyd Mayer

November 14, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 26, 2016

Rushton on Nonprofit Museums


Michael J. Rushton (Indiana University Bloomington - School of Public & Environmental Affairs) has posted Should Public and Nonprofit Museums Have Free Admission? on SSRN with the following abstract:

A common pricing structure for American art museums is to offer a choice between an admission fee for a single visit, and the purchase of an annual membership that would allow the member an unlimited number of visits with no additional charge. This paper evaluates this particular method of museum pricing in terms of efficiency and equity. It concludes, drawing from the economic analysis of two-part pricing, that there is a strong rationale for the membership model, and that this is so even in cases where the museum experiences an increase in unrestricted endowment such that “free” membership would be financially sustainable.

--Eric C. Chaffee

September 26, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Fei, Hines, Horwitz: Are PILOTs Property Taxes for Nonprofits?

Fan FeiJames HinesJill Horwitz


Fan Fei
(Michigan), James R. Hines Jr. (Michigan), and Jill R. Horwitz (UCLA) have published Are PILOTs Property Taxes for Nonprofits?, 94 Journal of Urban Economics 109 (2016). This is a significantly revised version of the paper with the same title that they posted on SSRN last year. Here is the abstract:

Nonprofit charitable organizations are exempt from most taxes, including local property taxes, but U.S. cities and towns increasingly request that nonprofits make payments in lieu of taxes (known as PILOTs). Strictly speaking, PILOTs are voluntary, though nonprofits may feel pressure to make them, particularly in high-tax communities. Evidence from Massachusetts indicates that PILOT rates, measured as ratios of payments to the value of local tax-exempt property, are higher in towns with higher property tax rates: a one percentage point higher property tax rate is associated with a 0.2 percentage point higher PILOT rate. PILOTs appear to discourage nonprofit activity: a one percentage point higher PILOT rate is associated with 0.8% lower real property ownership by local nonprofits, 0.2% lower total assets, and 0.2% lower revenues of local nonprofits. These patterns are consistent with voluntary PILOTs acting in a manner similar to low-rate, compulsory real estate taxes.

Lloyd Mayer

September 22, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Chicago-Kent Law Review Publishes Symposium: Nonprofit Oversight Under Siege

The Chicago-Kent Law Review has posted its Symposium Issue on Nonprofit Oversight Under Siege: Chicago Kent Law Review

Introduction
Dana Brakman Reiser, Brooklyn Law School
91 Chi.-Kent. L. Rev. 843 (2016).

Exile to Main Street: The I.R.S.’s Diminished Role in Overseeing Tax-Exempt Organizations
Evelyn Brody, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law
Marcus Owens
91 Chi.-Kent. L. Rev. 859 (2016).

Politics, Disclosure, and State Law Solutions for 501(c)(4) Organizations
Linda Sugin, Fordham Law School
91 Chi.-Kent. L. Rev. 895 (2016).

Fragmented Oversight of Nonprofits in the United States: Does it Work? Can it Work?
Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer, Notre Dame Law School
91 Chi.-Kent. L. Rev. 937 (2016).

The Charity Commission for England and Wales: A Fine Example or Another Fine Mess?
Debra Morris, School of Law and Social Justice, Liverpool
91 Chi.-Kent. L. Rev. 965 (2016)

European Non-profit Oversight: The Case for Regulating From the Outside In
Oonagh B. Breen, Sutherland School of Law
91 Chi.-Kent. L. Rev. 991 (2016).

Australia – Two Political Narratives and One Charity Regulator Caught in the Middle
Myles McGregor-Lowndes, Queensland University of Technology
91 Chi.-Kent. L. Rev. 1021 (2016).

Reforming the Regulation of Political Advocacy by Charities: From Charity Under Siege to Charity Under Rescue?
Adam Parachin, Western University
91 Chi.-Kent. L. Rev. 1047 (2016).

Does Work Law Have a Future if the Labor Market Does Not?
Noah D. Zatz, UCLA School of Law
91 Chi.-Kent. L. Rev. 1081 (2016).

Looks like a fascinating set of articles and outstanding group of authors (including our own Lloyd Mayer)!

-JosephWMead

September 15, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Thirty Years of Nonprofit Research: Scaling the Knowledge of the Field 1986-2015

Ji Ma (PhD student) and Assistant Professor Sara Konrath, both of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) - Center on Philanthropy, have posted their research paper, Thirty Years of Nonprofit Research: Scaling the Knowledge of the Field 1986-2015, to SSRN.  Below is the abstract for their paper:

This empirical study examines knowledge production between 1986 and 2015 in the research field of nonprofit and philanthropic studies using science mapping and network analysis. This is essential to understand the “Third Sector” better, which along with the business sector and government, forms and underpins the function of society at large.

Results suggest that scholars in this field have been actively generating a considerable amount of literature. The rapidly growing intellectual base suggests a solid backing for continuing development of this field as a new discipline. Knowledge produced in this field is not only growing in number, but also forming several main themes which have been actively developed since the mid-1980s – a signal of knowledge cohesion. Our findings are significant from numerous perspectives. The study provides empirical evidence for this field developing into a new discipline, and its future advancement faces a critical challenge: the lack of geographic and cultural diversity resulting from the domination of research taking place in the “Anglosphere.” This study also emphasizes the importance of new paradigms in mitigating the tension between theory and practice – a challenge commonly faced by academic disciplines.

Methodologically, our paper provides an example of applying network analysis and science mapping in studying the knowledge of a new social science field. Pedagogical implications, limitations, and future directions are also discussed.

TLH

September 8, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 12, 2016

Breen: European Non-Profit Oversight

Oonagh BreenOonagh Breen (Dublin) has posted European Non-Profit Oversight: The Case for Regulating from the Outside In, 91 Chicago-Kent Law Review (forthcoming 2016). Here is the abstract:

When it comes to the regulation of non-profits, the European Commission experiences many of the same pressures and constraints faced by national charity regulators. It suffers, however, from an added disadvantage in that, arguably, it lacks jurisdictional competence to regulate non-profits qua non-profits. This article explores the consequences of the Commission’s unsuccessful attempt to secure the passage of its proposal for a European Foundation Statute (‘EFS’). Notwithstanding the European Council’s inability to muster the necessary Member State unanimity required to pass the proposal and its subsequent demise, the Commission is still dogged by the problems it identified as giving rise to the need for the EFS in the first instance. Against this background, Part I reviews the rationale for the EFS proposal, the political concerns that left it vulnerable to veto and the structural challenges faced by the Commission in legislating for non-profits at a European level. The argument is advanced that extant a purely functional approach, European regulation of nonprofits from ‘the inside out’ is difficult in the absence of a valid treaty basis.

Part II proceeds to examine recent NGO attempts to influence the Financial Action Task Force (‘FATF’) reform process (supported by the European Commission) and to demand a fairer process under FATF Recommendation 8 for dealing with NGOs. The European Commission’s role in assisting NGOs to bring pressure on the FATF to be more accountable and transparent in its dealings presents an interesting vignette of one regulator laying siege to another for the greater good of better non-profit oversight. Arguably, the Commission’s attempts at ‘regulating from the outside in’ has led to it demanding a higher level of transparency of the FATF than it has been willing to provide to NGOs itself in the past, while simultaneously enhancing Commission-NGO relations. The article concludes that it is now timely for the European Commission to be alert to the possibilities of regulating from the outside in on occasions when it may not be so possible to regulate from the inside out.

Lloyd Mayer

August 12, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Buckles: The Sexual Integrity of Religious Schools and Tax Exemption

JohnnyBucklesJohnny Rex Buckles (Houston) has posted The Sexual Integrity of Religious Schools and Tax Exemption on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

Many private universities and other schools adhere to religiously grounded codes of conduct that embrace heterosexual monogamy as the sole moral context for sexual relationships. The federal income tax exemption of these schools has been questioned following the recent Supreme Court opinion of Obergefell v. Hodges. In Obergefell, the Supreme Court held that the right to marry is a fundamental constitutional right that same-sex couples may exercise. The relevance of this decision to the federal tax status of private religious schools arises from another Supreme Court decision, Bob Jones University v. United States. The Court in Bob Jones held that two schools with racially discriminatory policies as to students were not entitled to exemption from federal income tax because the policies violate established public policy. The issue now is whether the sexual conduct policies of private religious schools violate the established public policy of the United States following Obergefell. After reviewing Bob Jones and surveying the application of the public policy doctrine by the IRS and the courts, this article argues that, regardless of the factual context of a controversy in which the IRS seeks to invoke Bob Jones to deny or revoke federal income tax exemption, the public policy doctrine should be narrowly construed. Applying a suggested framework for limiting the public policy doctrine coherently, this Article argues that schools maintaining sexual conduct policies that prohibit sexual activity inconsistent with their religiously informed, traditional view of marriage remain tax-exempt after Obergefell. Apart from the proposed framework, this Article further explains why Obergefell’s analytical approach, language and tone are inconsistent with applying Bob Jones to the disadvantage of religious schools that maintain sexual conduct policies.

Lloyd Mayer

August 12, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Galle: Corporate Compliance without Enforcement?

Galle-webBrian Galle (Georgetown) has posted Corporate Compliance without Enforcement?: Private Foundations and the Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Funds Act on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

I examine the determinants of nonprofit corporate compliance with law using a large panel of over one million firm-years. Despite the almost total absence of any credible enforcement threat, I find widespread compliance. I exploit rolling state adoption of the Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Funds Acts, which lifted some existing limits on firm spending, but which applied to some but not all firms within each state. This allows the use of triple-difference estimates that control for changes in local norms and economic conditions. Interacting the triple-difference factors with other predictors of compliance, I find no correlation between compliance and enforcement intensity, but some evidence that compliance is correlated with firm culture and reliance on accountants. I argue that my findings are among the first to discover compliance in the absence of a meaningful formal deterrence mechanism. Further, my findings have important implications for the governance of charitable organizations.

Lloyd Mayer

 

August 12, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Górski: The Case for Research on Regulatory Neutrality Toward Various Shades of Social Entrepreneurship

Jedrzej-gorski (1)Jędrzej Górski (The Chinese University of Hong Kong) has posted The Case for Research on Regulatory Neutrality Toward Various Shades of Social Entrepreneurship on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

This working paper discusses the case for research on regulatory policy toward social entrepreneurship and specifically pertains to regulatory policy toward social ventures. The main theme of this working paper is the regulatory neutrality toward various shades of social entrepreneurship and its secondary subject is the convergence of policies toward THE private and public sectors. As such, this working paper touches upon company law, tax law and commercial aspects of the regulation of activities conducted by charities, NGOs, etc.

In recent decades, the charitable landscape worldwide has undergone a significant transformation first with respect to using business methods in support of social missions (social enterprises) and, second, with regard to combining social missions with make-money paradigm (social ventures). The austerity measures in the Western hemisphere, commercialisation/privatisation of state-owned enterprises in post-communist countries and an economic slowdown in Asian “tiger” nations all necessitated a rise of private charity self-supported by social entrepreneurship as a substitute for governmental action. Social ventures have been proliferating in this environment, yet have suffered from public-policies (fiscal environment, inflexibility of the design of business organisations) confined to not-for-profit social enterprises, and lawmakers everywhere have largely failed to address this problem.

The time is therefore ripe for revisiting representative policy models, and to defend the claim that efficient regulatory policies can be neutral toward various shades of social entrepreneurship and well integrate social ventures to the overall benefit of society. A dogma (that not-for-profit social enterprises can better substitute for governmental action than their for-profit counterparts because only the former can enjoy specific governmental supports and receive private donations) shall be dispelled by offering a number of flexible mechanism allowing rewarding private mission-driven business organisations according to the scope of their mission and regardless of their not-for-profit status.

Such research essentially demands perusal of policy and legislative documents produced roughly in the post-2005 period in a number of jurisdictions (mostly Anglo-Saxon like the UK, Vermont followed by other states, British Columbia, but also South Korea) where lawmakers took on the issue of social ventures but, all as one, adopted only fragmentary solutions which did not disenchant the for-profit or not-for profit binary mindset. Identified problems (definition of charity, limits of the scope of business operations of social enterprises, non-distribution constraint etc. on the side of not-for-profits and non-deductibility of mission-related expenses etc. by for-profits) need to be deconstructed one by one toward a complex system reflecting the entire spectrum of social entrepreneurs and based on the principle that the more mission the more governmental privileges, yet more supervision.

Such a complex system would include a number of novel solutions. The commonly accepted general profit-tax exemption for not-for-profits shall be discarded in favour of wider deductibility of charitable expenses combined with exemption of donations (including charitable price premiums in excess of market prices paid by donors for commercial goods or services). The non-distribution constraint (banning dividends or equity rights in dissolution) shall strictly reflect paid-in donations thereby balancing the interests of investors and donors. Finally, a simplistic supervision system requiring periodical reporting to public authorities shall be discarded in favour of a system balancing interests of public and private (donors) stakeholders in the fashion of corporate governance in public companies.

Such solutions could be universally applicable and could be used not only for private social entrepreneurship but also for preserving the social functions of gradually privatised state-owned enterprises.

Lloyd Mayer

 

August 12, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

McGiverin-Bohan et al.: Local Officials' Support for PILOTs/SILOTs

SPEAKellie McGiverin-Bohan, Kirsten Grønbjerg, Lauren Dula, and Rachel Miller (all affiliated with the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs) have published Local Officials' Support for PILOTs/SILOTs: Nonprofit Engagement, Economic Stress, and Politics, Public Administration Review (forthcoming 2016). Here is the abstract:

Nonprofit property tax exemption has become a major policy issue as the collapse of the housing market, the Great Recession, and property tax caps have threatened local tax collections. Consequently, many local governments have sought to obtain payments in lieu of taxes (PILOTs) from charities that are formally exempt from property taxes. Using a 2010 survey of local government officials in Indiana, this article examines whether support for PILOT policies is related to officials’ personal involvement with nonprofits, their views on government–nonprofit relationships, the type of position they hold, the level of economic distress in the county, local political conditions, and local nonprofit wealth. The findings support most of these hypotheses but also show that attitudes toward PILOTs appear to be shaped by somewhat different concerns than attitudes toward services in lieu of taxes (SILOTs).

Lloyd Mayer

August 12, 2016 in Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)