Thursday, August 4, 2016

D.C. Debating Property Tax Laws

A recent post on Non Profit Quarterly by Ruth McCambridge explains tensions between nonprofits in big cities (Such as D.C. in this article) and the legislature. In Washington D.C., nonprofits occupy over $10 billion worth of real estate, which could generate over $111 million per year in tax revenue. Instead, the district collects nothing from them.

Two universities in the district alone account for $48 million in uncollectable property tax revenue. The District is considering the idea of making a change requiring payments in PILOT form, but has been pondering this idea for nearly fifty years.

Undoubtedly, these institutions bring an immense amount of revenue to the District, through research, attracted talent, and general expenditures by students and faculty. However, it is not clear if these benefits outweigh the costs of not receiving property taxes.

It is estimated that currently 28 different states have municipalities that collect PILOT payments; however these payments amount to far less than what the property taxes would have been worth.

It will be interesting to see if the legislature changes the current set up. Between the federally owned tax-exempt buildings, and those occupied by nonprofits, the district is missing out on over one billion dollars of tax revenue.

David Brennen

August 4, 2016 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative, In the News, State – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

California Blood Bank Faces Uncertainties

A recent development in California leaves the status of a local non-profit blood bank in question. However, Hemopet is not your typical blood bank, it is a blood bank for animals. Founded in 1986, Hemopet was the nation’s first 501(c)(3) non-profit blood bank and quickly grew to national scale. Currently, Hemopet supplies 40% of the nation’s emergency canine blood, and saves the lives of thousands of dogs each year.

In 1965, a law was enacted that exempted blood banks from taxation. Unfortunately, animal blood banks were not around at the time. A recent audit by state officials led to the conclusion that Hemopet should not be considered tax exempt, and that they owed over $80,000 in unpaid taxes. A bill is set to be presented to the California Assembly Committee on Appropriations on August 3rd that will clear up the status of the non-profit. Dr. Jean Dodds, president and founder of Hemopet, believes that if the bill passes requiring Hemopet to pay the $80,000 they will be forced to shut down. In addition to the potential shortage on emergency canine blood, closing Hemopet would leave over 200 Greyhounds homeless and 45 people would lose their jobs.

Hemopet officials are encouraging Californians to contact the Assembly Committee on Appropriations to voice their support for the organization.

 

David Brennen

August 2, 2016 in Current Affairs, In the News, State – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, August 1, 2016

Non-Profit Challenges Legality of Zoning Restriction

Community Basics, a Lancaster, PA non-profit, is challenging the legality of a local zoning ordinance that effectively limits the ability of the Salisbury Township’s residents to obtain affordable multifamily housing. The proposed law would require the re-zoning of a 16.6-acre plot of land that is currently zoned for industrial use. The site would contain six buildings and 138 apartment units.

Currently, less than one percent of the township’s total land is zoned to allow multifamily housing. Township officials deny any wrongdoing and contend the zoning is necessary for critical industrial development. The Supreme Court has invalidated a zoning restriction before that only allotted 1.14 percent of a town’s land for multifamily housing. The Salisbury Township ordinance allows for .74 percent of the town’s land to be used for multifamily housing. To further limit the access to multifamily housing, the township requires four parking spaces per housing unit, an expensive barrier to building new housing units.

The challenge aims to curb the shortage of rental housing available to the Salisbury Township residents. Rent for the new units would be based on income, and would range from $315 to $945 monthly. The hearing for the ordinance is set for Aug. 24.

David Brennen

August 1, 2016 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, July 31, 2016

Massachusetts Contemplating Change in Non-Profit Property Tax

Proposed legislation in Massachusetts would potentially shake-up the current state of their local non-profits. The proposal would make it necessary for current non-profits to begin paying property taxes, and continue to do so for the next four years (churches and houses of worship remain exempt). Currently, non-profit organizations are exempted from paying property tax, but occupy more than 13 percent of taxable property within the state. The proposal is a small part of an overall economic stimulus plan that seeks to provide over $700 million in assistance throughout the state.

Proponents of the legislation argue that aggressive land purchases by larger non-profits make it more difficult for smaller entities to find land. They also believe exempting the non-profits ultimately raises property taxes for others in the community. Opponents believe that taxing non-profits will make it necessary for them to cut back on their services provided, and could lead to employees being laid off. This could have a wide impact, as non-profit jobs are an estimated 17 percent of the state’s workforce (approximately 500,000 jobs), and pay more than $30 billion in wages.

Although both sides present compelling arguments, it is imperative for policy makers to thoroughly analyze the true impacts of their decisions. It will be interesting to see what how the good people of Massachusetts respond to this proposal.

David Brennen

July 31, 2016 in Current Affairs, In the News, State – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, July 28, 2016

501(c)(3) Organizations & the Ban on "Intervening" with Political Campaigns

A recent post by Benjamin Leff on The Surly Subgroup highlights the 50+ year ban on 501(c)(3) organizations (here, specifically churches) “intervening” in a campaign for public office. Arguments for and against the ban range from an infringement of free speech, to churches using their power to distort the electoral process. However, the main issue discussed is that although churches want to get in to court to challenge the ban, they believe the IRS won’t let them. For a compelling read on how these organizations may be granted their “day in court” and some possible reform suggestions, read the above linked post.

David Brennen

July 28, 2016 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative, In the News, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Town and Tech in San Francisco

The Guardian reports that under a proposal in San Francisco: “large tech employers in the city, potentially including Google, Twitter, Uber, Airbnb and Salesforce, would be required to pay a 1.5% payroll tax. The estimated $120m in annual revenue would be used to fund affordable housing and services for the city’s large homeless population." The effort is intended to help address that San Francisco is “one of the most unequal places in the US.”

July 7, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Public Trust in UK Charities at All Time Low

The Nonprofit Times Reports that trust in charities in the UK has fallen to its lowest level, declining 10% over the past two years. The article cites concerns about aggressive fundraising practices, charities more concerned in sustaining themselves than in their mission, scandal, high compensation levels, and low expenditures all as leading to public revolt. The government is contemplating setting up a new fundraising regulatory body. The article notes that the crisis in confidence comes at a terrible time, because after the Brexit vote it is likely that British charities will have fewer resources (loss of EU funding) and face greater need. RC

July 7, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Dept of Labor: Volunteers who Provide a Benefit to Organization Are Employees, Must Be Paid Minimum Wage

A church encourages its parishioners to volunteer for a fundraiser.  More than 100 individuals heed the call and volunteer their time: some a few hours, some much more.  The Department of Labor then sues for violations of federal labor law for failing to pay the workers—who DOL considers “employees”—a minimum wage as required by the Federal Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Angley

Sound unlikely?  Well, this exact scenario is playing out in Ohio in the case of Perez v. Cathedral Buffet.  Ernest Angley, of televangelism infamy, runs a church and a buffet restaurant.  According to court papers, the restaurant is organized as a for-profit organization owned entirely by the church, although the restaurant does not make and has not made a profit.  Parishioners volunteer for the buffet—sometimes sporadically, sometimes regularly.  105 of the would-be employees signed affidavits indicating that they did not receive any economic advantage from volunteering, and they volunteered for the sense of community the opportunity provided.  Department of Labor has sued Cathedral Buffet and the Ernest Angley for years of failing to pay volunteers.

In response to the argument that the volunteers do not need to be paid a minimum wage, the Department of Labor has taken the following position:

But even if the volunteers did not expect compensation, they certainly did not work solely for their own purpose or pleasure, without immediate benefit to the Buffet.  Former Church member Roadman declared that she felt pressure to volunteer.  (Roadman Decl. ¶6.)  And although the Employers claim the volunteers received a “sense of community” or “satisfaction,” the benefit to them was vastly outweighed by the benefit received by the Buffet.  The Buffet actively sought out volunteers to help staff the Buffet, and Angley even admitted that the use of volunteers was a cost-saving measure.  (Angley Dep. 35:7-36:11, 50:21-25.)   And unlike in Portland Terminal, the Buffet’s workers are not being trained or otherwise working under the close scrutiny of paid employees.  

The Buffet cannot rely on the goodwill of the Church members to provide labor that would otherwise be done by paid employees and be compensable under the Act.  And the Buffet cannot pressure individuals into providing free labor, then shield itself from FLSA liability under the guise of the Church’s religious mission.

---

In other words, DOL’s legal position seems to be that an organization MUST pay minimum wage to volunteers as employees if it 1) asked the individual to volunteer and 2) it receives a benefit from those volunteers. If this is the standard, then a lot of organizations are in trouble.  After all, a lot of organizations depend on appeals to religious or moral duty to convince people to volunteer.  And while some charities likely tolerate volunteers even if they don’t add value, many organizations depend on volunteers to make their operations successful.  (Earlier in the case, DOL took the position that it was impossible to "volunteer" for a for-profit enterprise, although its latest briefing appears to have abandoned this position, which had been rejected by several other courts.)

Can Labor’s position possibly be right? Well… probably not, but maybe:

Continue reading

June 29, 2016 in Federal – Judicial | Permalink | Comments (3)

Thursday, June 23, 2016

For Purpose Law Group: Origins of Ban on Political Electioneering for 501(c)(3) Organizations

With the election season coming up (errr, well underway), the ban on 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations supporting or opposing a candidate for political office will no doubt be cited, critiqued, and misunderstood by countless pundits and nonprofits.  For Purpose Law Group has a blog post tracing its interesting history:

First, the total ban on political campaigning for 501(c)(3) charities was offered as a last-minute, “non-germane” amendment to the massive new Internal Revenue Code; and, second, Senator Johnson’s rationale was based on a significantly incorrect characterization of the 1934 lobbying restriction.

First, the total ban on political campaigning for 501(c)(3) charities was offered as a last-minute, “non-germane” amendment to the massive new Internal Revenue Code; and, second, Senator Johnson’s rationale was based on a significantly incorrect characterization of the 1934 lobbying restriction. - See more at: http://www.forpurposelaw.com/501c3-political-ban-history/#sthash.tO9YJwoL.dpuf

Read the rest here.

@JosephWMead

June 23, 2016 in Federal – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 20, 2016

State Attorneys General Urge Caution When Donating in Response to Orlando Massacre with UPDATE

Seal_of_the_Attorney_General_of_IndianaAnticipating an uptick in charitable giving, some state Attorneys General (e.g., Indiana and Ohio) urge caution before donating to charity, and supply the following tips:

  • Evaluate charities using information from AG offices, IRS filings, and other resources such as Charity Navigator* (UPDATE: see below) or Guidestar
  • Beware of sham charities & look-alike sites:  some appeals will use similar names to well-established nonprofits
  • Be cautious of newly-formed charities:  may lack the experience to properly or effectively handle donations
  • Investigate how your donation will be used:  look for destination of funds and what percentage will benefit specific charitable purpose
  • Stay away from crowdfunding or peer-to-peer fundraising:  state law typically prohibits soliciting donations on behalf of a charity without charity's prior consent

It is good to be prudent, but do these consumer alerts discourage charitable giving? Are there any tips that you would add or eliminate to the list? (Note that these "tips" go beyond law and offer the Attorney Generals' views on best practices for charity, without distinguishing between law and opinion, the latter of which might not be shared by everyone.)

Editor’s note: A national organization with broad knowledge about local operations of charitable organizations privately shared that Charity Navigator only rates a small number of nonprofits but many people don’t realize this and assume that if a nonprofit is not listed, it is not recommended. Additionally, Charity Navigator has itself acknowledged the downsides of analyzing overhead ratios as a method of rating a charity’s effectiveness, but continues to use a methodology that places emphasis on administrative costs. Consequently, the national organization recommends that donors ideally should get to know the nonprofit first-hand, and learn more by reading about the nonprofit on GuideStar.org.

@JosephWMead

June 20, 2016 in Current Affairs, State – Executive | Permalink | Comments (2)

Friday, June 17, 2016

IRS Releases Searchable Form 990 Data

The IRS has released over one million Form 990 series returns spanning a six year time period in machine-readable format, using Amazon Web Services (AWS) as the host site for this data.  From the AWS website:

Machine-readable data from certain electronic 990 forms filed with the IRS from 2011 to present are available for anyone to use via Amazon S3.

Form 990 is the form used by the United States Internal Revenue Service to gather financial information about nonprofit organizations. Data for each 990 filing is provided in an XML file that contains structured information that represents the main 990 form, any filed forms and schedules, and other control information describing how the document was filed. Some non-disclosable information is not included in the files.

This data set includes Forms 990, 990-EZ and 990-PF which have been electronically filed with the IRS and is updated monthly in an XML format. The data can be used to perform research and analysis of organizations that have electronically filed Forms 990, 990-EZ and 990-PF. Forms 990-N (e-Postcard) are not available withing this data set. Forms 990-N can be viewed and downloaded from the IRS website.

The related IRS News Release provides:

“The publicly available information on the Form 990 series is vital to those interested in the tax-exempt community,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “The IRS appreciates the feedback we’ve received from a variety of outside partners as we’ve worked together to explore improvements to make this data more easily accessible.” 

The data includes Form 990, Form 990-EZ and Form 990-PF and related schedules with the exception of certain donor information. The IRS also redacts certain personally identifiable tax-identification numbers to prevent the data’s misuse. Data from Form 990-N (e-postcard) used by certain smaller exempt organizations is not available with this data, but it can be accessed through IRS.gov.

Over 60 percent of all Form 990 returns are electronically filed with the IRS. Both paper and electronically filed 990 returns will continue to have image files made and these files will continue to be available by DVD.

. . .

Form 990 is the IRS' primary tool for gathering information about tax-exempt organizations, educating organizations about tax law requirements and promoting compliance. Organizations also use the Form 990 to share information with the public about their programs. Additionally, most states rely on the Form 990 to perform charitable and other regulatory oversight and to satisfy state income tax filing requirements for organizations claiming exemption from state income tax.

With filed Forms 990 now available in machine-readable format, it will be easier for interested persons, including charity watchdog groups and state regulators, to search for information regarding an organization's revenues and expenditures, compensation practices, lobbying activities, related party transactions, officers and directors, and other activities required to be disclosed on Form 990.  Previously, the IRS released filed Forms 990 only in image format as PDF documents, even when the organization filed its Form 990 electronically. 

TLH

June 17, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 10, 2016

Totally OT: Your Daily Funny Courtesy of the FEC and the Business Law Prof Blog

So this is off topic, I'll admit, but it gave me a laugh this morning so I thought I'd share.   There's some law in there, somewhere.   From fellow Law Prof Blog blogger Anne Tucker at the Business Law Prof Blog, her blog post entitled Your Daily Funny Courtesy of the FEC

 

Keep reading only if you have 3 minutes that you don't care about being productive or relating to business law, at least not directly.

The Federal Election Committee issued a proposed draft of an advisory opinion on a question brought by Huckabee for President,  Inc.--the committee responsible for the 2016 presidential campaign of  former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee.  The Committee wanted to know if it can use part of a legal defense fund to pay a settlement. The FEC says yes.  This isn't an election law blog, so I won't go into the details.  The litigation arose over the campaign's use of the song "Eye of the Tiger".  The FEC,  feeling quite cheeky writes the following: 

The complaint, seeking injunctive relief and monetary damages, alleged that 21 the Committee had violated federal copyright law by playing the song “Eye of the Tiger” at a campaign event on September 8, 2015. The Committee,rising up to the challenge of its rival, incurred attorneys’ fees and other expenses in defending itself in that litigation. After briefly relishing the thrill of the fight, the parties settled the lawsuit for an undisclosed amount.

Has the political circus of the 2016 election warped the sense of decorum at the FEC or should we all want to be friends with the lawyers there?  I can't decide.  But I do know that you should (a) click on the link to the song, and (b) jam away in your office for the next 4 minutes.  

You are welcome.

-Anne Tucker

 
Enjoy having that go through your head for the rest of the day.  And if that leaves you wanting more, try this!    EWW
 
 
(P.S. It's far happier that mourning Gordie Howe with strains of Brass Bonanza, which is what was stuck in my  head previously.  God's speed, Mr. Hockey.)  
 
 
 

June 10, 2016 in Federal – Executive, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Chaffee, "Collaboration Theory: A Theory of the Charitable Tax Exempt Nonprofit Corporation"

Eric C. Chaffee, Professor and Associate Dean of Faculty Research & Development at the Univerity of Toledo College of Law,  presented his paper entitled "Collaboration Theory: A Theory of the Charitable Tax Exempt Nonprofit Corporation" on June 2 at the most recent Law & Society conference (Program Link here). The current draft of the paper, which is forthcoming 2016 in the U.C. Davis Law Review, is available on SSRN here - the SSRN abstract follows:

Legal scholarship regarding tax exempt nonprofit entities is meager at best. Although some excellent treatises, book chapters, and journal articles have been written, the body of scholarship relating to these entities is not nearly as healthy and robust as the scholarship relating to their for-profit companions. This is especially troubling considering that nonprofit entities help to improve our society in a myriad of different ways.

This Article seeks to fill a void in the existing scholarship by offering an essentialist theory for charitable tax exempt nonprofit corporations that helps to explain the essence of these entities. Beyond the purely academic metaphysical inquiry into what is a corporation, understanding the essential nature of these corporations is important because it helps to determine how they should interact with society, what rights they should have, and how they should be governed by the law. This discussion is especially timely because the recent opinions by the Supreme Court of the United States in Citizens United and Hobby Lobby have reinvigorated the debate over the essence of the corporation.

This Article breaks new ground by offering a new essentialist theory of the corporation, which shall be termed “collaboration theory.” The decades of debate over the essence of for-profit corporations has coalesced into three prevailing theories of the corporation, i.e., the artificial entity theory, the real entity theory, and the aggregate theory. The problem is that none of these prevailing theories fully answers the question of what is a corporation.

Collaboration theory suggests that charitable tax exempt nonprofit corporations are collaborations among the state governments, federal government, and individuals to promote the public good. Unlike the prevailing theories of the corporation, collaboration theory explains both how and why charitable tax exempt nonprofit corporations exist, which provides a fuller and more robust understanding of these corporations. Collaboration theory advances the existing scholarship by finally offering an essentialist theory for nonprofit corporations, and it shows remarkable promise for understanding the essential nature of for-profit corporations as well.

 

E.W.W.

 

 

June 8, 2016 in Conferences, Paper Presentations and Seminars, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, June 6, 2016

Senate Finance Scrutiny of Private Museums Continues

According to this Chronicle of Philanthropy article (citing arts newsletter Hyperallergic), Senate Finance Committee Chair is continuing his scrutiny of private museums, now by requesting clarification from the IRS regarding its stance on private museums.    You may recall that last fall, Senator Hatch sent a letter of inquiry to a number of private museums, requesting details regarding the museum's operation - fellow blogger Nickolas Mirkay detailed those letters here.   Hyperallergic indicated that one of Hatch's primary concerns was the public availability of collections  (including limited hours and advance reservations)  and the continuing role of donor of the art collection in the management of the museums.   Much of this scrutiny may stem from a series of New York Times articles regarding private museums, including here and here.

Inquiries of this type bother me somewhat.   It seems to me that current law regarding private benefit is probably sufficient to handle many of the perceived abuses (maybe it's an enforcement issue - just throwin' it out there).   The drumbeat of the articles and the Senate inquiry may lead to additional regulation - and I suspect they will use a mallet rather than a surgical instrument to deal with the issue, if history is any guide.

EWW

 

June 6, 2016 in Current Affairs, Federal – Executive, Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 3, 2016

Lamboy-Ruiz, Cannon Watanabe on Earnings Management in U. S. Hospitals

Melvin A Lamboy-Ruiz, James N. Cannon, and Olena Watanabe have posted The Influence of Ownership and Regulatory Scrutiny on Earnings Management in U. S. Hospitals on SSRN with the following abstract:

We examine accrual and real earnings manipulations in U.S. hospitals, where we expect differences in hospital ownership (nonprofit vs. for-profit) will result in varying incentives to manage earnings. First, we document that nonprofit hospitals have lower levels of income-increasing and income-decreasing earnings manipulations than for-profit hospitals. Second, when we partition nonprofit hospitals by states with community benefits laws, we find that this greater regulatory scrutiny is associated with lower income-decreasing and income-increasing earnings management. Further, under regulatory scrutiny, nonprofit hospitals provide a greater proportion of uncompensated (charity) care with respect to net revenue. By examining differences in regulatory scrutiny types (i.e. reporting only vs. provision only), we find that either requirement is associated with less severe earnings management. Turning to actual patient care provided, we document that hospitals under regulatory scrutiny provide more uncompensated care, while reporting less compensated care costs as a proportion of net revenue. Notably, the higher uncompensated care observed under regulatory scrutiny is associated with the community benefits provision only requirement, but not with the reporting only requirement. Overall, our findings suggest that reporting incentives associated with ownership and those influenced by increased regulatory scrutiny help to improve earnings quality, and that the provision requirement alone benefits stakeholders more than reporting requirement alone by incentivizing nonprofit hospitals to offer more community benefits.

--Eric C. Chaffee

June 3, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Mountanos v. Commissioner—9th Circuit Affirmed Tax Court’s Denial of Conservation Easement Donation Deductions and Imposition of Penalties

Mountanos new pic copyMountanos involved a landowner who donated a conservation easement with respect to undeveloped land in Lake County, California, in 2005. The landowner reported that the easement had a value of $4.69 million, claimed a federal charitable income tax deduction of $1.3 million on his 2005 income tax return, and claimed the remaining $3.39 million in the form of carryover deductions on his 2006, 2007, and 2008 returns.  

In Mountanos v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2013-138 (Mountanos I), the Tax Court sustained the IRS’s disallowance of the carryover deductions, finding that the taxpayer failed to prove that the highest and best use of the land changed as a result of the donation and, thus, that the easement had any value. The statute of limitations had apparently run on the landowner’s 2005 return. The Tax Court also found that the taxpayer was liable for strict liability gross valuation misstatement penalties under IRC § 6662(h).

In Mountanos v. Comm'r, T.C. Memo. 2014-38 (Mountanos II), the Tax Court denied the taxpayer’s motions to reconsider, vacate, or revise its opinion in Mountanos I. Asking the court to consider alternative (non valuation) grounds for denying the deduction in Mountanos II was, said the Tax Court, “a calculated maneuver to avoid the accuracy-related penalty.”

In a short (just over 3-page) unpublished opinion, Mountanos v. Comm’r, No. 14-71580 (9th Cir., June 1, 2016) (Mountanos III), the Ninth Circuit affirmed the Tax Court’s holding that the landowner (i) was not eligible for the carryover deductions claimed on his 2006, 2007, and 2008 income tax returns and (ii) was liable for a strict liability gross valuation misstatement penalty with regard to each return. The Ninth Circuit explained that, even if the Tax Court erred in failing to assign some non-zero value to the potential to subdivide the property into seven separately salable parcels, the error was harmless because the evidence indicated the easement had a value of no more than $210,000, which was far less than the $1.3 million the landowner claimed as a deduction on his 2005 return. In addition, even if the easement had a value of up to $210,000, the landowner remained subject to gross valuation misstatement penalties because the value he reported on his income tax returns for the easement ($4.69 million) was more than four times (400%) of that value. Finally, the Ninth Circuit rejected the landowner’s argument that not allowing him to raise the reasonable cause defense for his gross valuation misstatements on his 2006, 2007, and 2008 returns constituted an improper retroactive application of the strict liability penalty, which was enacted as part of the Pension Protection Act of 2006. Citing Chandler v. Comm'r, 142 T.C. 279 (2014), the Ninth Circuit explained that the landowner had "reaffirmed" his gross valuation misstatement with respect to the easement on the returns in which he claimed the carryover deductions.  

Nancy A. McLaughlin, Robert W. Swenson Professor of Law, University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law

June 2, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

International Committee of the Red Cross E-Briefing: Principles Guiding Humanitarian Action

The International Committee of the Red Cross has compiled an E-Briefing on Principles Guiding Humanitarian Action.  The introduction describes the E-Briefing as follows:

The seven "Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement" are the expression of a set of values and experiences distilled from over a century and a half of protecting the lives and dignity of people affected by conflict and disaster worldwide. This e-briefing is intended as a multimedia resource that traces the latest developments in the contemporary debate on these principles. Far from having being limited to reaffirming their enduring relevance and far-reaching influence, this worldwide reflection also refined our mastery of the humanitarian principles as eminently pragmatic tools that, when applied judiciously on the ground, carry the power for more humanitarian effectiveness amidst the most challenging crises of our times.

--Eric C. Chaffee

June 1, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

June 1 Deadline Reminder - Call For Papers Joint Program of the AALS Sections on Agency, Partnerships LLCs, and Unincorporated Associations & Nonprofit and Philanthropy Law

CALL FOR PAPERS

LLCS, NEW CHARITABLE FORMS, AND THE RISE OF PHILANTHROCAPITALISM

2017 AALS Annual Meeting
January 3-7, 2017
San Francisco, CA
________________________________________
In December 2015, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Dr. Priscilla Chan, pledged their personal fortune—then valued at $45 billion—to the Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), a philanthropic effort aimed at “advancing human potential and promoting equality.” But instead of organizing CZI using a traditional charitable structure, the couple organized CZI as a for-profit Delaware LLC. CZI is perhaps the most notable example, but not the only example, of Silicon Valley billionaires exploiting the LLC form to advance philanthropic efforts. But are LLCs and other for-profit business structures compatible with philanthropy? What are the tax, governance, and other policy implications of this new tool of philanthrocapitalism? What happens when LLCs, rather than traditional charitable forms, are used for “philanthropic” purposes?

From the heart of Silicon Valley, the AALS Section on Agency, Partnerships LLCs, and Unincorporated Associations and Section on Nonprofit and Philanthropy Law will host a joint program tackling these timely issues. In addition to featuring invited speakers, we seek speakers (and papers) selected from this call.

Any full-time faculty of an AALS member or fee-paid school who has written an unpublished paper, is working on a paper, or who is interested in writing a paper in this area is invited to submit a 1- or 2-page proposal by June 1, 2016. The Executive Committees of the Sections will review all submissions and select two papers by July 1, 2016. If selected, a very polished draft must be submitted by November 30, 2016. All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the Chairs of the Sections at the email addresses below:

Mohsen Manesh
Associate Professor
University of Oregon School of Law
mohsen@uoregon.edu

Garry W. Jenkins
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
John C. Elam/Vorys Sater Professor of Law
The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law
jenkins.434@osu.edu

 

--Eric C. Chaffee

May 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 30, 2016

Brody on the Charity Property Tax Exemption

Evelyn Brody has posted The 21st Century Fight Over Who Sets the Terms of the Charity Property Tax Exemption on SSRN with the following abstract:

Turning from the substantive issue of defining charity, this article considers the “who” question by examining the roles of the courts, legislatures, municipalities, and charities in determining exemption and payments in lieu of taxes. The three covered topics – constitutional power, statutory interpretation, and the “intermediate sanctions” of user fees and PILOTs – braid together to form the procedural framework for the financial relationship between nonprofit property owners and the taxing jurisdictions that host them. Change the parameters of one, and you change the others.

Staying off the rolls or minimizing the tax bite often results from compromise – whether at the state constitutional level; in state statutes; as a matter of assessment; or through negotiation with local governmental bodies. But such an application of a multi-level framework for mischief leads to legal incoherence. The article begins with the knockdown, drag-out separation-of-powers fight that has arisen in Illinois and Pennsylvania: Which branch, the judicial or legislative, defines “charities” granted exemption by the state constitution?

Next up is the more mundane world of statutory interpretation, where even here courts second-guess the legislature. A June 2015 decision by the New Jersey tax court exemplifies what could be view as “passive-aggressive separation of powers,” when the court basically says, “Surely the legislature could not have meant this entity (or this use of property) to qualify as charity.” This latest decision not only seems to render all “sophisticated centers of medical care” in New Jersey taxable, but also is causing sleepless nights for Princeton University: The same judge is hearing a challenge to the university’s exemption brought by local taxpayers.

New Jersey’s January 2016 proposed legislation fell a pocket veto short of enactment: It would have imposed a formulary community-service fee on nonprofit hospitals. Legislative efforts are again underway. Perhaps such a third-way solution might become more common. Voluntary agreements for payments in lieu of taxes are literally all over the map, from Boston’s revamped comprehensive PILOT program to a Florida appellate court’s striking of a PILOT program as inconsistent with statutory exemption. Will the people’s branch get the last word after all?

--Eric C. Chaffee

 

May 30, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Berg on Religious Nonprofits

Thomas C. Berg has posted Partly Acculturated Religious Activity: A Case for Accommodating Religious Nonprofits on SSRN with the following abstract:

Many of today’s most vexing problems concerning the accommodation of religion involve religious organizations that straddle the perceived boundary of the public and private: that is, not the "private" instance of churches and their clergy, but rather nonprofit organizations (religious colleges, adoption agencies, etc.) that employ or serve people outside their faith but also make religious freedom claims to follow their religious norms in the face of generally applicable laws (contraception mandates, anti-discrimination laws, etc.). I refer to these organizations and activities as "partly acculturated": acculturated in that they reach out to the broader society to provide services of general civic value, but unacculturated in that some of their doctrines and practices clash with dominant secular values. To many critics, it is plainly improper to accommodate partly acculturated activity: when an organizations hires or serves people outside its faith, it must follow whatever rules the government sets.

This paper argues that we should make real efforts to protect religious freedom for partly acculturated religious activities. The law should not force all religious organizations and activities into one of the two polar categories, acculturated or unacculturated. Part II presents several reasons why there is a strong interest in protecting the freedom to engage in partly acculturated religious activity. Among other things, I argue, relying on work in sociology of religion, that refusing accommodation to partly acculturated activity risks losing the distinctive vigor that such organizations offer in providing services to society: their countercultural positions tend to create a sense of identity and commitment, while their acculturation means they apply that identity to serve society rather than withdraw from it.

Accommodating partially acculturated activity does present distinctive challenges because of effects on non-adherents. Part III proposes addressing those, and drawing lines concerning accommodation, by relying on concepts of:(1) notice to employees and clients concerning the organization’s religious identity, and (2) alternative sources of receiving the services or opportunities in question.

--Eric C. Chaffee

May 30, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)