Media Law Prof Blog

Editor: Christine A. Corcos
Louisiana State Univ.

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Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Subpoenas, ISPs, Anonymous Posters, and Public and Private Plaintiffs In Defamation Suits

Jason C. Miller, University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) Law School, has published Who's Exposing John Doe? Distinguishing Between Public and Private Figure Plaintiffs in Subpoenas to ISPs in Anonymous Online Defamation Suits in volume 13 of Journal of Technology Law & Policy (2008). Here is the abstract.
 

The Communications Decency Act prevents victims of online defamation from suing intermediaries like Internet Service Providers and online message board operators. As a result, plaintiffs have resorted to filing John Doe lawsuits and subpoenaing Internet companies to reveal the identity of anonymous online posters as a way to silence defamatory speech. The purpose of these John Doe lawsuits is not to win a monetary judgment but instead to silence the critic through exposure. Currently, First Amendment considerations lead to distinguishing between public and private figure plaintiffs in what must be proven to win a defamation suit on the merits. This article argues that those same considerations should also lead to distinguishing between what public and private figure plaintiffs must prove to issue a subpoena to expose an anonymous online critic.

Download the article from SSRN here.

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/media_law_prof_blog/2009/04/subpoenas-isps-anonymous-posters-and-public-and-private-plaintiffs-in-defamation-suits.html

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