Monday, October 15, 2012

NY Times Article on Chinese Drywall

On October 12, 2012, the New York Times reported on several decisions holding that Taishan Gypsum, the Chinese manufacturer of questionable drywall, was subject to personal jurisdiction in the United States.  Specifically, Judge Fallon in the federal MDL (located in Louisiana) and Judge Farina in the Miami Dade Circuit Court both ruled that Taishan Gypsum targeted the Florida market by "courting Florida companies, mailing drywall samples to Florida, [and] selling large amounts of drywall to Florida-based companies."

Even Congress has gotten involved and some members have introduced the Contaminated Drywall Safety Act that would insist the Chinese government force manufacturers to acquiesce to American jurisdiction.  So far, however, the bill has been passed only in the House.

The NY Times article is available here.

ECB

October 15, 2012 in Current Affairs, Environmental Torts, Products Liability | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, October 12, 2012

Possible BP Settlement with Federal Government Over Deepwater Horizon Gulf Oil Spill

Two Wall Street Journal articles in recent days have tracked recent settlements talks between BP and the federal government regarding civil and criminal liability in connection with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf.  On Wednesday, the Journal reported, BP Close to Spill Settlement: Multibillion-Dollar Deal With U.S. Would Combine Civil, Criminal Liabilities.  But on Thursday, the Journal noted in Slick Complicates BP Liability Talks that a new thin oil slick determined to be related to the prior Deepwater Horizon spill has appeared. 

BGS

October 12, 2012 in Environmental Torts, Mass Disasters, Settlement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, August 2, 2012

Chevron v. Donziger Summary Judgment Motion

The saga continues with a 97 page opinion by Judge Kaplan denying the plaintiff Chevron's motion for partial summary judgment with leave to refile.   I haven't read the opinion yet but the table of contents promises a lot of fodder for civil procedure mavens, especially summary judgment and personal jurisdiction. 

You can find a copy of the opinon here.

You can find coverage of the opinion at these locations:

AbovetheLaw

Associated Press

Bloomberg News

And a great story about this piece of the long-standing litigation at the New Yorker last year.

ADL

 

August 2, 2012 in Environmental Torts, Procedure | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Thomas J. Donahue on "Tort Tourism" in Foreign Courts

Thomas J. Donahue, President and CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, has an op-ed entitled, U.S. Firms Prone To 'Tort Tourism' In Foreign Courts, in Investor's Business Daily.  The op-ed particularly discusses the Chevron case in Ecuador. 

BGS

July 18, 2012 in Environmental Torts, Foreign, Lawyers, Procedure, Travel | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Chevron, Ecuador, and Allegations of Misconduct

In yesterday's Wall Street Journal, Mary Anastasia O'Grady has an article, Chevron's Ecuador Morass: The U.S. oil company charges that the $18 billion judgment against it was secured by fraud, which discusses Chevron's attempts in federal district court in Miami to obtain records to show bribery of a court expert.

Another article in today's Wall Street Journal discusses recent decisions from the Southern District of New York. In one opinion, the court allowed certain claims by Chevron, including RICO claims, to proceed against attorney Steven Donziger in connection with Donziger's alleged role as advisor in the Ecuadoran lawsuit, but in the other opinion, the court denied Chevron's motion to attach various assets. 

BGS 

May 15, 2012 in Environmental Torts, Ethics, Foreign, Lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

AALS Workshop on Torts, Environment & Disaster

In June, the Association of American Law Schools will host a major conference in Berkeley, CA, on environmental disasters. The sessions include such cheery topics as "History of Disaster," "Psychology of Disaster," "Disaster Federalism," and "Disaster Justice." Along the way, there will be sessions on tort law, environmental law, and regulatory perspectives on environmental disasters. The disputes arising out of 9/11, Katrina, and the Gulf oil spill leave no doubt that environmental catastrophes present some of the most challenging problems of mass tort litigation in the 21st century.

The speakers include many of the leading scholars in torts, environmental law, complex litigation, and related fields, including Tom Baker, David Dana, Daniel Farber, Sheila Foster, Myriam Gilles, Michael Green, Laura Hines, Keith Hylton, Gregory Keating, Douglas Kysar, Jonathan Masur, John Nagle, Adam Scales, Peter Schuck, Anthony Sebok, Catherine Sharkey, Jed Shugerman, Stephen Sugarman, and many others (and me!). I will speak on a panel about principles for compensation programs and mass settlements.

The conference will take place June 8-10 at the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley. The brochure is here. A TortsProf plug for the conference is here

HME

May 2, 2012 in 9/11, Conferences, Environmental Torts, Mass Tort Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 23, 2012

Move Over Amchem - The BP Settlement Class Action Is Here

George Conk has the links to the BP settlement class action.  A quote from the complaint: "The principle was two-fold:  to design claims frameworks that fit a wide array of damage categories, and, within each category, to treat like claims alike, so as to proceed with both fairness and predictability."  

Conk also notes that the settlement offers a "risk transfer premium" for future injuries/losses.   You can find more posts here.

Interesting to think how the court will treat this high profile settlement class action, whether there will be objectors and appeals.

ADL

April 23, 2012 in Aggregate Litigation Procedures, Class Actions, Environmental Torts, Settlement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, March 4, 2012

More Information on the BP Settlement

As I've been sifting through news report on the BP class action settlement, I've noticed that it's hard to find information on the actual settlement terms.  From what reporters are describing, it sounds like the parties are requesting that Judge Barbier certify two Rule 23(b)(3) classes.  The most comprehensive information comes from the BP Press release.  Here are a few of the most notable passages on the settlement's terms and conditions:

The proposed settlement is comprised of two separate agreements, one to resolve economic loss claims and another to resolve medical claims. Each proposed agreement provides that class members would be compensated for their claims on a claims-made basis, according to agreed compensation protocols in separate court-supervised claims processes. The proposed agreement to resolve economic loss claims includes the financial commitment for the Gulf seafood industry and a fund to support continued advertising that promotes Gulf Coast tourism. 

The proposed agreement to resolve medical claims involves payments based on a matrix for certain currently manifested physical conditions, as well as a 21-year medical consultation program for qualifying class members. It also provides that class members claiming later-manifested physical conditions may pursue their claims through a mediation/litigation process. Consistent with its commitment to the Gulf, BP would also provide $105 million to improve the availability, scope and quality of healthcare in Gulf communities. This healthcare outreach program would be available to all individuals in those communities, regardless of whether they are class members. It would include expanding capacity to address community health needs, including primary care, mental health services and access to environmental health specialists, as well as enhanced training and education related to Gulf Coast health issues.

Under the proposed settlement, class members would release and dismiss their claims against BP. The proposed settlement is not an admission of liability by BP. 

The proposed settlement also provides that, to the extent permitted by law, BP will assign to the PSC certain of its claims, rights and recoveries against Transocean and Halliburton for damages not recoverable from BP. 

The proposed settlement is subject to reaching definitive and fully-documented agreements within 45 days, and if those agreements are not reached, either party has the right to terminate the proposed settlement. Once there are definitive and fully-documented agreements, BP and the PSC would then seek the Court’s preliminary approval of the settlement. Under federal law, there is an established procedure for determining the fairness, reasonableness and adequacy of class action settlements. Pursuant to this procedure, and subject to the Court granting preliminary approval of both agreements, there would be extensive outreach to the public, including through advertisements and direct mail, to explain the settlement agreements, class members’ rights, including the right to “opt out” of the classes, and the processes for making claims. The Court would then conduct fairness hearings at which class members and various other parties would have an opportunity to be heard and present evidence. The Court would then decide whether or not to approve each proposed settlement agreement.
The proposed economic loss settlement provides for a transition from the Gulf Coast Claims Facility (GCCF) administered by Kenneth Feinberg. "Ken Feinberg has overseen the GCCF since it began operating in August 2010, and we thank him and his team for their dedication and professionalism," said Mr. Dudley. "During Mr. Feinberg's tenure, BP has paid approximately $6.1 billion to resolve more than 220,000 claims from individuals and businesses through the GCCF." 

A court-supervised transitional claims process for economic loss claims will be in operation while the infrastructure for the new settlement claims process is put in place. During this transitional period, the processing of claims that have been submitted to the GCCF will continue, and new claimants may submit their claims. 

Payments in class action settlements typically are not made until after final approval of a settlement, but BP has agreed not to wait for final approval of the economic loss settlement before claims are paid. The economic loss claims process will continue under court supervision before final approval of the settlement, first under the transitional claims process, and then through the settlement claims process established by the proposed economic loss agreement.

ECB

March 4, 2012 in Current Affairs, Environmental Torts | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, March 3, 2012

Settlement Reached in BP Litigation

John Schwartz at the New York Times reports that the litigation surrounding the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill has settled for all of the litigants except the federal government.  The Judge overseeing the litigation issued the order late Friday night and will review the settlement. 

Here's the report from Bloomberg as well.

According to these reports, either the settlement will be paid by the $20 billion fund BP created to compensate victims or the fund will close and be replaced by a court overseen claims facility.  In any event, the amount of the settlement is $7.8 billion that from these reports is not in addition to the $20 billion already set aside. 

More to come. ADL

March 3, 2012 in Environmental Torts, Mass Disasters, Procedure, Settlement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Precedent for BP Settlement?

An intrepid reporter asked me today what a good precedent would be for a settlement in the BP litigation - something on point, not a products liability mass tort settlement but an environmental toxic tort settlement of the magnitude that this would have to be.  I couldn't think of anything except the Exxon case, which of course was litigated.  Any other ideas?

ADL 

February 29, 2012 in Environmental Torts, Settlement | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

BP Today, Tomorrow and Into the Future

Gentle Readers,

You don't need the Mass Tort Litigation Blog to tell you that the imminent BP trial has been stayed pending settlement talks.  In the meantime, here are some thoughts from the ever relevant George Conk. Special shout out for his poetic references:  Diving Into the Wreck: BP and Kenneth Feinberg's Gulf

I was just at a wonderful conference at the Charleston School of Law on Mass Torts and the Federal Courts where Feinberg spoke.  One of the key questions at the conference is the extent to which claims facilities (BP, 9/11, etc.) are unique and unlikely to be repeated or the wave of the future.  The interesting thing about BP is that it shows the interaction between claims facilities and litigation - its not one or the other.  Speakers mentioned how companies trying to get ahead of a litigation may well look to the BP model.   Others questioned whether BP was really special because the company was prepared to admit liability (although not gross negligence). 

I was especially interested by the remarks of Sheila Birnbaum, currently running the 9/11 Fund for first responders and who mediated settlements for the 94 families who chose not to participate in the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund.  Even the families who wanted a public trial to find out what happened ultimately settled because of the uncertainty of trial.  This raises important questions about the purpose of litigation for individuals: is it ultimately to get compensation? How important is it to get to the "truth"?  How important is vindication?  Punishment?  When people settle (or waive their right to litigate prior to filing suit), what kind of consent do we want and does money ultimately satisfy?  Lynn Baker, who was at the conference, referred me to the following article that addresses some of these questions: Gillian Hadfield, Framing the Choice Between Cash and the Courthouse: Experiences with the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund.  This continues to be relevant, especially if Funds become a model rather than a one-off.

ADL

February 28, 2012 in 9/11, Aggregate Litigation Procedures, Conferences, Environmental Torts, Lawyers, Mass Disasters, Mass Tort Scholarship, Settlement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, February 18, 2012

The Upcoming Trial in the Deep Horizon Litigation

NPR has a story with lots of interesting quotes. My favorite:

"There's only one place where a waitress or a shrimper can be on equal footing with a company the size of BP, and that's a courtroom," says Rhon Jones, with the Montgomery, Ala., law firm Beasley Allen. Jones is part of the plaintiffs' steering committee, a group of lawyers coordinating the case.

The story raises a series of important questions about the purpose of litigation and settlement.  Is it best for society to funnel cases outside that system as in the BP and 9/11 cases? What is the use of a trial - to apportion liability? get to the truth? allocate damages? figure out difficult causation questions?  Are different plaintiffs to be treated differently - for example the waitress and the shrimper above as opposed to the attorneys general of the affected states?

Edited to add: I just saw the blog post by George Conk about the potential ineligibility of many plaintiffs who did not file claims with the compensation fund.  See here for more analysis.

ADL

February 18, 2012 in Environmental Torts, Settlement, Trial | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, January 30, 2012

More on the Second Circuit's Refusal to Block Enforcement of Ecuadoran Judgment

No Formaldehyde Liability for US for FEMA Trailers After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, Fifth Circuit Holds

The decision in In re FEMA Trailer Formaldehyde Products Liability Litigation, Nos. 10-30921, 10-30945 (5th Cir. Jan. 23, 2012), turns on liablity for the government "to the same extent" as private individuals, under the Federal Torts Claims Act, and the protection afforded private individuals giving voluntary disaster assistance under Good Samaritan statutes in Alabama and Mississippi.

BGS

January 30, 2012 in Environmental Torts, Mass Disasters | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, January 21, 2012

Chevron Appeals $8.6 billion Judgment to Ecuador's National Court

CNN reports that Chevron has appealed the $8.6 billion environmental judgment to Ecuador's National Court.  The case has been closely watched not only for its high dollar amounts, but for the questions raised by Chevron about the integrity of Ecuador's courts.  Questions of foreign-court bias may be more frequent as mass tort litigation increasingly becomes global tort litigation, and disputes against large, deep-pocketed corporations are brought by foreign claimants in foreign courts.

BGS

January 21, 2012 in Environmental Torts, Ethics, Foreign, Mass Disasters, Punitive Damages | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Zimmerman on Compensation Funds

Adam Zimmerman (St. John's) has a nice post on Prawfsblawg called "The Rise of Executive (Branch) Compensation" in which he discusses the historical antecedents and politics of compensation funds for mass disasters.  It reminds us that not all worthy victims have been the beneficiaries of such funds and the reasons why some are picked (and others are not) are not always clear.  

ADL

January 17, 2012 in 9/11, Environmental Torts, Mass Disasters, Settlement, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, January 14, 2012

BP, the Gulf Coast Claims Fund, and MDL Plaintiffs' Lawyers

All that in the recent interesting op-ed from New York Times business columnist Joe Nocera -- BP Makes Amends.

BGS

January 14, 2012 in Aggregate Litigation Procedures, Environmental Torts, Informal Aggregation, Lawyers, Mass Disasters, Procedure, Punitive Damages, Settlement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, December 5, 2011

Fight Ensures over Attorneys' Fees in BP Oil Spill MDL

Yesterday's NY Times had an article by John Schwartz titled, "Plaintiffs' Lawyers in a Bitter Dispute Over Fees in Gulf Oil Spill Cases."  The article chronicles the now typical battle over attorneys' fees in multidistrict litigation where judges compensate Plaintiffs' Steering Committee members from other attorneys' fee awards.  This dispute is particularly bitter; the steering committee is asking for fees not just from those involved in the federal multidistrict litigation, but from those who negotiated their own recoveries from the privately administered Gulf Coast Claims Facility.

ECB

December 5, 2011 in Current Affairs, Environmental Torts, Ethics, Lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Vanderbilt Law Review Symposium on the BP Oil Spill

You can access the article from their website: www.vanderbiltlawreview.org

Or read a summary of the pieces on Concurring Opinions.

ADL

November 30, 2011 in Aggregate Litigation Procedures, Environmental Torts, Mass Disasters, Mass Tort Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, November 7, 2011

Southwestern Symposium on CERCLA and the Future of Liability-Based Environmental Regulation

CERCLA symposium
On this Friday, November 11, 2011, Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles will host a symposium on CERCLA and the Future of Liability-Based Environmental Regulation.  Here's a description of the symposium:

Enacted in 1980, CERCLA takes a unique approach to federal environmental regulation. Unlike other major federal environmental statutes, CERCLA addresses soil and groundwater contamination through a tort-like liability scheme imposing joint and several, retroactive liability on broad classes of covered persons to clean up contaminated property. With billions of dollars in aggregate cleanup costs at stake, CERCLA has generated substantial and unrelenting litigation over the past three decades that will likely continue for years to come. 

CERCLA presents challenging issues about the relationship between federal and state pollution laws on topics ranging from regulatory oversight to toxic torts. Some accuse CERCLA's broad liability scheme and remediation process requirements (the "national contingency plan") of fostering sprawl by discouraging in-fill property development. Others object to federal and state "brownfield" laws promoting more streamlined in-fill remediation on environmental justice grounds. The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decisions in Aviall, Atlantic Research and Burlington Northern raised new questions about the scope of CERCLA liability, the extent of public and private cost recovery rights, and incentives for polluters to settle CERCLA liabilities with regulatory authorities. 

These timely issues address important concerns affecting industries, communities and regulators across the country; they also present bigger picture questions. Has CERCLA worked? Can it be improved? Should CERCLA's tort-like liability-based approach to environmental regulation be employed to address other environmental problems? This symposium will explore the impact of CERCLA on the current state of contaminated property law over the past 30 years and the future of liability-based environmental regulation. 

UPDATE -- Here's a desciption of the symposium panels:

Panel #1: CERCLA and Federalism.  This panel will discuss the relationship between state and federal contaminated property and land use law, including issues relating to the evolution of state Superfund statutes and tort law, preemption, and concurrent federal, state and local regulatory authority. Speakers:   Prof. Robin Kundis Craig (Florida State); Prof. Alexandra Klass (Minnesota); Prof. William Rodgers (Washington); Moderator:  Prof. Ann Carlson (UCLA)

Panel #2: CERCLA, Brownfields and Distributive Equity.  This panel will focus on the economic, public health and social welfare impacts of CERCLA liability and remediation process requirements on land use and redevelopment, including the economic benefits and environmental justice implications of state and federal brownfield programs.  Speakers:  Prof. Joel Eisen (Richmond); Prof. Eileen Gauna (New Mexico); Jay Pendergrass, Esq. (Environmental Law Institute); Nicholas Targ, Esq. (Holland & Knight);Moderator:  Romel Pascual (Deputy Mayor for Environment, City of Los Angeles)

Panel #3: CERCLA – Public Enforcement.  This panel will focus on the effectiveness and normative value of     CERCLA’s liability-based regulatory scheme, including an evaluation of the public health and welfare efficacy of the CERCLA cleanup process under the national contingency plan, and the effect of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Atlantic Research and Burlington Northern decisions on public enforcement and regulatory agency settlement options.  Speakers Prof. Martha Judy (Vermont); Prof. Joel Mintz (Nova Southeastern); Prof. Robert Percival (Maryland); Moderator: Professor Daniel Selmi (Loyola)

Panel #4: CERCLA – Private Enforcement.  This panel will explore the impact of the AviallAtlantic Research and Burlington  Northern decisions on CERCLA private cost recovery litigation, as well as waste disposal and litigation behavioral incentives on the regulated community created by CERCLA and the dispute resolution challenges presented by CERCLA’s liability scheme.  Speakers:  Prof. Steven Ferrey (Suffolk); Prof. Craig Johnston (Lewis & Clark); Prof. Alfred Light (St. Thomas); ModeratorProf. Ronald Aronovsky (Southwestern)

 

BGS

November 7, 2011 in Conferences, Environmental Torts, Mass Tort Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)