Tuesday, April 3, 2007

Prof. Doug Rendleman on Defendant's Appeal Bond and Punitive Damages Tort Reform

SsrnInteresting article posted on SSRN -- A Cap on the Defendant's Appeal Bond?: Punitive Damages Tort Reform, by Professor Doug Rendleman of Washington & Lee School of Law.  Here's the abstract:

The defendant's supersedeas or appeal bond was a servile drudge of appellate procedure until enormous punitive damages verdicts catapulted it out of local courthouses into headlines. From the verdict that exceeded $10 billion in Pennzoil v. Texaco in the 1980s to the punitive damages verdict of $145 billion in Engle v. Liggett Group that was reversed in the summer of 2006, appeal bonds have played a crucial role in huge-verdict litigation. This article's topic - tort reform statutes that cap an appeal bond - stemmed from punitive damages verdicts in smokers' trials against tobacco companies.

Beginning with appellate procedure, the article traces the appeal bond through related topics: federal abstention, bankruptcy, the arguments for and against state tort-reform statutes that cap an appeal bond, and state and federal constitutional doctrines, including the United States Constitution's Full Faith and Credit Clause.

Since constitutions neither compel nor forbid a limited appeal bond, the author resolved that the decision to cap or not to cap resides in the legislature's realm of evaluating public policy. The appeal bond cap's function of facilitating the defendant's entryway to the appellate court whose warranty is a crucial imprimatur for accurate and legitimate judicial decisionmaking convinced the author to commend a cap of $25 to $50 million for a defendant's appeal bond on a jury's verdict for punitive damages.

BGS

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/mass_tort_litigation/2007/04/prof_doug_rendl.html

Mass Tort Scholarship, Procedure, Punitive Damages | Permalink

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