Marijuana Law, Policy & Reform

Editor: Douglas A. Berman
Moritz College of Law

Monday, February 5, 2018

Still more research "suggesting broader access to medical marijuana facilitates substitution of marijuana for powerful and addictive opioids"

S01676296The March 2018 issue of the Journal of Health Economics includes this new research article that provides still further support for a claim that greater access to marijuana may be able to play a role in reducing use and abuse of opioids.  The new article is authored by David Powell, Rosalie Liccardo Pacula and Mireille Jacobson under the title "Do medical marijuana laws reduce addictions and deaths related to pain killers?".  Here is its abstract:

Recent work finds that medical marijuana laws reduce the daily doses filled for opioid analgesics among Medicare Part-D and Medicaid enrollees, as well as population-wide opioid overdose deaths.  We replicate the result for opioid overdose deaths and explore the potential mechanism.  The key feature of a medical marijuana law that facilitates a reduction in overdose death rates is a relatively liberal allowance for dispensaries.  As states have become more stringent in their regulation of dispensaries, the protective value generally has fallen.  These findings suggest that broader access to medical marijuana facilitates substitution of marijuana for powerful and addictive opioids.

Some (of many) prior related posts:

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/marijuana_law/2018/02/still-more-research-suggesting-broader-access-to-medical-marijuana-facilitates-substitution-of-marij.html

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