Marijuana Law, Policy & Reform

Editor: Douglas A. Berman
Moritz College of Law

Friday, May 20, 2016

John Hudak pens terrific "memo to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump on marijuana policy"

Regular readers are likely used to seeing me in this space praise the work being done by Brookings in general, and John Hudak in particular, in the arena of responsible and thoughtful discussion of marijuana law, policy and reform.   This latest Brookings piece by Hudak, styled "A memo to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump on marijuana policy," further demostrates why my praise is justified. I recommend the lengthy piece is full, and here are excerpts from how it starts and ends and the headings in between: 

Eight months from today one of you will be inaugurated the 45th President of the United States. There is much to think about between now and then, but one issue with a penchant for falling between the cracks is marijuana policy.  Marijuana policy is no longer just a punchline, reserved for the attention of activists. Marijuana policy will be a serious part of the next administration’s domestic policy, and it is critical that you create a strategy accordingly.

Both of you have suggested you are open to reforms or, at a minimum, to let states operate as they wish. However, a laissez-faire approach to cannabis is a dangerous stance that creates a bevy of policy problems at the federal, state and local levels. There is tremendous complexity involved in creating a uniform and consistent policy strategy.  Marijuana will impact almost every corner of your administration — some obvious, some less so. To get it right — that is to make sure that your administration advances your policy goals — there are seven key steps to take.

1. When vetting possible appointees, ask them about cannabis....

2. Talk to Congress about marijuana....

3. Talk to states that passed marijuana reform....

4. Talk to cannabis businesses, patients, consumers, and activists....

5. Talk to marijuana reform opponents....

6. Talk to scientists studying (or trying to study) cannabis....

7. Think about your marijuana legacy....

The nation is changing its views on cannabis, and reform is not a flash in the pan, but a certainty in the future of American public policy.  Your administration has the opportunity to initiate a sensible, safe, effective, and robust reform that reflects the policy changes in the states and a federal government ready to facilitate a working system.  You can help mold the future of this policy, or you can be a bystander to history, remembered more for being a roadblock than a transformational policy champion.  Ten years ago it would have been toxic to engage marijuana policy in this way, but as America changes its mind on cannabis, it may be even more toxic to stand by and do nothing about it.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/marijuana_law/2016/05/john-hudak-pens-terrific-memo-to-hillary-clinton-and-donald-trump-on-marijuana-policy.html

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