Monday, May 31, 2010

LWI Conference Preview - Monday

The Legal Writing Institute Conference is the most important event for legal writing professors.  The number of sessions can be overwhelming (particularly for first time attendees) and you will usually find yourself wanting to be in more than one room at the same time. 

To help you plan your LWI experience, we will share with you the selections for each of the sessions.  Here are the choices for Session 2 on Monday, which follows the plenary session. 

(mew)

Monday, June 27, 2010

Session 2:  11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Islands Ballroom,

Salons B&C

A is for Think-Alouds, B is for (Fill-in) the Blanks of Mindmap, and C is for Clickers.

Robin Boyle-Laisure, Michael Hunter Schwartz & Danton Berube  

We will begin our session with an interactive, clicker-based discussion of the student benefits of teaching to different learning styles.  We will then engage participants in other learning activities designed to meet a variety of learning styles, and we will conclude with a summary of a recent study involving the use of clickers in the classroom.

Format:  Lecture with Q&A

Objective:  Share teaching ideas, present research or scholarly work

Islands Ballroom, Salon F

A Conversation About What Cognitive Scientists and Composition Theorists Know That We Don’t about Using Examples to Improve Learning

Terrill Pollman 

Using sample documents and models like IRAC routinely generate controversy in the legal writing community.  After examining what some cognitive learning theorists and composition theorists have learned about exemplars and models, participants will have the chance to talk about these pedagogies and our teaching practices.

Format:  Lecture with Q&A, round table discussion

Objective:  Share teaching ideas, present research or scholarly work

Islands Ballroom, Salon G

New Teachers

Writing an Effective Syllabus Is a Thoughtful Pedagogical Act

Nancy Soonpaa   

Writing an effective syllabus helps to set up a successful course.  This presentation explores not only the nuts and bolts of an effective syllabus, but also the intended and unintended messages conveyed via both substantive choices regarding the course and the language used to present them.

Format:  Lecture with Q&A, pair and share

Objective:  Share teaching ideas

Islands Ballroom, Salons H&J

Assessment Planning in Legal Research and Writing Courses

Victoria VanZandt   

Assessment in legal education is becoming increasingly important as the American Bar Association considers requiring assessment of student learning outcomes in its accreditation standards.  This presentation will introduce the basics of assessment planning generally and will focus on the assessment of student learning outcomes in legal research and writing courses.

Format:  Lecture with Q&A

Objective:  Share teaching ideas, present research or scholarly work

Capri Ballroom, Salon 1

Branches and Roots: Exploring New Directions for Strengthening the Field of Legal Research and Writing Education

Judy Rosenbaum & Mary Barnard Ray   

This presentation will introduce the audience to trends and theories in writing instruction being used by our colleagues who teach composition in other areas of the curriculum in higher education.  It will engage the audience in a discussion of ways that these trends and theories can be incorporated into the LRW curriculum to enrich and energize our teaching and scholarship.

Format:  Lecture with Q&A, pair and share

Objective:  Share teaching ideas, present research or scholarly work, identify new directions for teaching and scholarship

Capri Ballroom, Salon 6

Social Justice and Legal Writing: Perspectives of Faculty, Students, and Partner Organizations on Collaborative Legal Writing

Mary Bowman, Janet Dickson & Deirdre Bowen   

At Seattle University School of Law, legal writing faculty collaborate with legal service organizations to develop writing problems for our students that address questions posed by the partner organizations, and we provide the best student work product to our partner organizations, who use that work product in a variety of ways, such as litigation or lobbying.  The projects, though not without challenges, have proven to be an energizing and valuable experience for students, faculty, and the organizations.  We will offer some practical advice about how to implement similar projects at other schools, based on our reflections, not only from the professors perspectives, but also from the perspectives of the students and the partner organizations.

Format:  Lecture with Q&A

Objective:  Share teaching ideas, discussion of student engagement

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