Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Paralyzed Veterans of America Writing Competition (for law professors and law students)

The Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) is holding its Sixth Annual Writing Competition for law professors and law students.  Veterans law is a branch of administrative law that usually does not get much attention, but this year's topic offers a good opportunity to discuss general theories of what role an appellate administrative adjudicator should play in system where claims are also subject to independent review.  The competition offers $3,000 prizes in both the student and professional divisions and PVA usually succeeds in having the winning articles published.  More information about the competition is available by clicking here.
 
The .pdf download of full submission information includes more detail on the topic that should be addressed and poses the question of what is the proper balance between independence and administrative control for agency adjudicators.  Papers are due by June 1, 2010.
 
For those not familiar with particulars of veterans law, a lot of useful research material (including indexes of relevant law review articles, legislative materials, oversight reports, etc.) is collected at the Veterans Law Library (click here).
 
My own law school has a Veteran's Clinic that works on a number of cases and issues.  This competition could be a great starting point for anyone interested in learning more and trying to help improve the process for our nation's veterans.
 
Hat tip to Victoria Hadfield Moshiashwili (Former Visiting Assistant Professor, College of Law, University of Illinois), Law Clerk to the Honorable Alan G. Lance, Sr. at the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims in Washington, D.C.
 
(mew)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legalwriting/2010/01/pva.html

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