Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Professionalism alert: Tell your students that when it comes to their resumes, don't "gild the lily."

The National Law Journal reports that given how desperate some job seekers have become in this market, employers are seeing much more resume fraud.  Here are some of the more egregious examples cited by the NLJ:

• Claiming to be a member of the Kennedy family — or a former professional baseball player — or a member of Mensa.

• Inventing a school that did not exist.

• Claiming to be the CEO of a company where the person was actually an hourly employee.

• Submitting a résumé with someone else's photo attached.

According to a couple of surveys mentioned in the article, lying on one's resume is a fairly common practice depending on how one defines "misrepresentation:"

A recent study by EmployeeScreenIQ, a Cleveland-based background screening company, found that roughly 50% of the résumés that it looks at have some kind of inconsistency. The Society for Human Resource Management puts the number even higher. It says 70% of all job applications provide information that is not fully accurate.

You can read the rest of the article here.

I am the scholarship dude.

(jbl)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legalwriting/2009/11/professionalism-alert-tell-your-students-that-when-it-comes-to-their-resumes-dont-gild-the-lily.html

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