Thursday, August 20, 2009

Job opening - Harvard is hiring Climenko teaching fellows for 1L legal writing course

Here's the post from the Legal Scholarship Blog:

The First-Year Legal Research & Writing program at Harvard Law School is currently hiring Climenko Fellows to teach in the program from summer 2010 to summer 2012. Climenko Fellows are aspiring legal academics who receive extensive support and mentoring for their scholarship while teaching legal research and writing. Former Fellows have gone on to tenure-track positions at Fordham, George Mason, the University of Minnesota, the University of Texas, the University of Toronto, and the University of Virginia, among other schools. If you are planning a career in legal academia, please consider applying for the fellowship. And please feel free to forward the attached flier to friends and colleagues who might be interested.


Harvard Law School invites applications for appointments as Climenko Fellows in its First Year Legal Research and Writing Program. Climenko Fellows are promising legal scholars with high academic achievements and a strong interest in teaching. The Fellows will teach in the Program and devote themselves to scholarship in preparation for entry into the law teaching market. The Law School anticipates hiring six Climenko Fellows for the 2010-2012 term, beginning in the summer of 2010. Each Fellow will teach one section of 40 first-year students in a Program whose content is coordinated by the Director of the Program. Fellows lead group classes five or six times during the semester but the emphasis of the Program is on the tutorial method of teaching, offering one-on-one critique of each of the students’ assignments. Each Fellow will be assigned three student teaching assistants to provide additional feedback to the students. While the workload will vary throughout the year, it is assumed that on a yearly basis, a substantial amount of a Fellow’s time will be available for work on scholarship. The Program undertakes to facilitate participation in faculty workshops relating to each Fellow’s fields of interest and to facilitate mentoring relationships with faculty working in those fields. Occasionally, a Climenko Fellow may have an opportunity to teach or co-teach a seminar or small course in the second year of the fellowship, depending on the needs of the academic program and the status of the Fellow’s own scholarship. Salary will be approximately $60,000 each year of the Fellowship, and Fellows will also receive funds to support research and scholarship.

A J.D. degree and a superior academic record are required. Further information about the program can be located at: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/lrw/. Applications will be accepted beginning on September 1, 2009, and will be evaluated on a rolling basis until November 13, 2009. To apply, send a resume, law school transcript, two or three letters of recommendation, and at least one scholarly writing sample to: Susannah Barton Tobin, Director, First-Year Legal Research & Writing Program, Harvard Law School, Griswold 1 North, Cambridge, MA 02138.

Harvard University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

I am the scholarship dude.

(jbl)

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http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legalwriting/2009/08/job-opening-harvard-is-hiring-climenko-teaching-fellows-for-1l-legal-writing-course.html

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Comments

Does anybody else think that these fellowship programs are a bad idea? Why hire somebody to teach a subject they don't want to teach (since the idea behind these fellowships is to allow the novice professor to work on scholarship in other fields so they can get a "regular" job teaching something other than legal writing). Doesn't that demean the subject of legal writing as "less worthy" than "regular" courses?

Posted by: Ken Chestek | Aug 21, 2009 4:17:43 PM

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