Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Alternative to the LSAT measures students' ability to research, write and problem solve

The New York Times is reporting today that two UC Berkeley Professors teamed up to design an alternative to the traditional LSAT entrance exam which they believe will better measure a student's likelihood of success in practice while avoiding the alleged discriminatory impact of the LSAT on African Americans and Hispanics.

To create the test, the researchers queried thousands of lawyers, judges, law professors, Berkeley alums and even clients to find out "If you were looking for a lawyer for an important matter for yourself, what qualities would you most look for?" 

Among the list of 26 characteristics of an "effective" lawyer generated by the study were things like, not so surprisingly, "like the ability to write, manage stress, listen, research the law and solve problems."

While the LSAC, which helped fund this study, still defends the LSAT as a good predictor of success in law school, some law school deans, like BC's John H. Garvey, say  "it would be good for us and for other schools to have other measures that complement the LSAT and that would help us identify promising candidates.”

Hat tip to the ABA Journal.

I am the scholarship dude.

(jbl) 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legalwriting/2009/03/alternative-to.html

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