Saturday, August 19, 2006

plug for ABA competitions

(a message from the ABA Law Student Division's Competitions Committee)

Would you like to help students at your school hone their critical thinking and legal skills?  The American Bar Association Law Student Division Competitions Program is the perfect vehicle to do just that!

By participating in one or more of the ABA Law Student Division four competitions, law schools can offer all their students the opportunity to participate in intraschool competitions to determine who will win the right and honor of representing their school at the regional competitions.

The ABA Law Student Division is now accepting entry forms for the following competitions:

Ø       Arbitration Competition (entry deadline is September 8)

Ø       Negotiation Competition (entry deadline is September 15)

Ø       Client Counseling Competition (entry deadline is October 27)

Ø       National Appellate Advocacy Competition (entry deadline is November 10)

Details about the competitions, as well as online entry forms and a pdf of the Competition Poster, can be found on the Competitions website at http://www.abanet.org/lsd/competitions/.

Last year, over 1,100 students from more than 150 ABA-approved law schools and 2,100 bench and bar members took advantage of the opportunity to participate in the Division’s regional and national competitions.

*************************************

(njs) (who must admit that she's on the negotiation competition subcommittee and has coached many teams)

August 19, 2006 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, August 17, 2006

Scribes annual luncheon

Belated congratulations to Scribes for a great event during the ABA annual meeting.

For those who didn’t attend the meeting, you might want to know that the membership approved a name change.

 

·        The old name:  Scribes – The American Society of Writers on Legal Subjects

·        The new name:  Scribes – The American Society of Legal Writers

( If you have webpages that link to Scribes, you might note the new name. )  

The speaker at the Scribes luncheon was Roy M. Mersky of the University of Texas School of Law, who spoke on "Issues in Legal Research and Writing.”  He was introduced by Dean Donald J. Dunn of the University of La Verne School of Law.

Scribes also presented its 46th (!) Book Award at the luncheon for the best new book in a legal subject, and a Brief-Writing Award for the best of all the winning briefs in national moot-court competitions.  The book award was presented by Judge Michael Hyman, immediate past president of the Chicago Bar Association.  I mention that because Scribes is one of those rare organizations that actively involves not only legal academics, but also practitioners and judges.

This is a splendid event, and you should plan to attend the next Scribes luncheon during next year’s ABA Annual Meeting.  There will also be a Scribes-sponsored event at the AALS Annual Meeting.  I believe Joe Kimble will share more information about that as we get closer to January.

If you teach at a law school and your law school is one of the institutional members of Scribes, then you’re a member. 

If your school isn’t a member, you should consider becoming a member as an individual.  Scribes publishes a quarterly newsletter, The Scrivener; and it publishes the unique and highly regarded journal, The Scribes Journal of Legal Writing.  Get more information about Scribes at its website, www.scribes.org.

I just want to also point out that I am not an officer in Scribes and have no personal stake in it.  I just think it is a great organization for legal writers, and one that provides a great mix of law professors, judges, and lawyers who are concerned with better legal writing.  I was an individual member for several years (until my law school joined as one of the institutional members).

- Prof. Mark E. Wojcik, The John Marshall Law School

(spl)

August 17, 2006 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

housing for visits

There's a new on-line service that helps professors line up housing when they visit away at another school or go on sabbatical:

http://www.academichomes.com/

I can't vouch for this service, since I've never used it and it appears to be quite new, but the idea sounds helpful.

(spl)

August 17, 2006 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, August 14, 2006

job opening in Baltimore

The following is an announcement from the University of Baltimore School of Law:

"The University of Baltimore School of Law invites applications for two tenure-track faculty members to teach in our Legal Analysis, Research, and Writing (LARW) program.

"The successful candidates will each teach one section of a required, first-year, fall semester course combining instruction in torts and legal research and writing.  We expect the size of each section to be 30-35 students.  Our second and third semester LARW courses will continue to be taught by adjunct faculty and student teaching assistants, under the direction of a full-time faculty member.  The successful candidates will administer and teach those courses on a rotating basis with other program faculty.  Successful candidates’ teaching loads may include other courses, depending on the candidates’ interests and the law school’s needs.  The positions carry the same scholarship requirements as all other tenure-track positions at the University of Baltimore, which may be satisfied by analytical writing in legal research and writing or other fields.  All faculty members at the University of Baltimore are expected to participate in faculty governance and other service activities.

"Applicants should submit a cover letter; a current resume; and the names, addresses and telephone numbers of three references. Applications sent via e-mail are preferred and should be sent to Professor Michael J. Hayes, Chair, Faculty Appointments Committee, mjhayes@ubalt.edu.  Hard copy applications may be sent to Professor Hayes at the University of Baltimore School of Law,
1420 North Charles St., Baltimore, MD, 21201.  For more information on the LARW program, visit our web site, http://law.ubalt.edu/larw/index.html, or contact Amy Sloan at 410-837-6529 or asloan@ubalt.edu.

"The Appointments Committee will begin to review applications on September 1, 2006, and will continue to review applications until the positions are filled. For full consideration, applications should be received by September 29, 2006.

"The University of Baltimore has strong commitments to the principle of equal employment opportunity and to the objective of having a diverse faculty. In furtherance of these commitments, we welcome applications from women and minorities.

"1.  The position advertised

X_  a.   is tenure-track.
__   b.   can lead to long-term contracts.
__   c.   has neither of these forms of job security.

"2.  The person hired will be permitted to vote in faculty meetings.

X_  a.   true
__   b.   not true

"3.  The school anticipates paying an annual academic year base salary in the range checked below.  (A base salary does NOT include stipends for coaching moot court teams, teaching other courses, or teaching in summer school; nor does a base salary include conference travel or other professional development funds.)

_X   a.   $80,000 or more
__   b.   $70,000 to $79,999
__   c.   $60,000 to $69,999

__   d.   $50,000 to $59,999
__   e.   $40,000 to $49,999
__   e.   $30,000 to $39,999
__   f.    less than $30,000

"4.  The person hired will teach legal writing, each semester, to the total number of students in the range checked below:

__   a.   less than 30
_X   b.   30 to 44 
__   c.   45 to 59
__   d.   more than 59

"We expect the sections in the fall semester course to have 30-35 students.  The second and third semester courses may have anywhere from 100-300 students in them.  Faculty members coordinating those courses create assignments, hire adjunct faculty and teaching assistants, and teach large group classes, but do not grade papers or hold student conferences."

(spl)

August 14, 2006 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, August 13, 2006

quotable

"Like stones, words are laborious and unforgiving, and the fitting of them together, like the fitting of stones, demands great patience and strength of purpose and particular skill."

- Edmund Morrison

(spl)

August 13, 2006 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)