Saturday, December 20, 2014

Further Understanding the Transfer Market -- A Look at the 2014 Transfer Data

This blog posting is designed to update my recent blog posting on transfers to incorporate some of the newly available data on the Summer 2014 transfer market.  Derek Muller also has written about some of the transfer data and I anticipate others will be doing so as well.

NUMBERS AND PERCENTAGES OF TRANSFERS – 2006-2008, 2011-2014

While the number of transfers dropped to 2187 in 2014 down from 2501 in 2013, the percentage of the previous fall’s entering class that engaged in the transfer market remained the same at roughly 5.5%, down slightly from 5.6% in 2013, but still above the percentages that prevailed from 2006-2008 and in 2011 and 2012.

 

2006

2007

2008

2011

2012

2013

2014

Number   of Transfers

2265

2324

2400

2427

2438

2501

2187

Previous   Year First Year Enrollment

48,100

48,900

49,100

52,500

48,700

44,500

39700

%   of Previous First-Year Total

4.7%

4.8%

4.9%

4.6%

5%

5.6%

5.5%

 

SOME SCHOOLS DOMINATE THE TRANSFER MARKET – 2012-2014

The following two charts list the top 20 transfer schools in Summer 2012 (fall 2011 entering class), Summer 2013 (fall 2012 entering class) and Summer 2014 (fall 2013 entering class) – with one chart based on “numbers” of transfers and the other chart based on the number of transfer students as a percentage of the prior year’s first year class.

Largest Law Schools by Number of Transfers from 2012-2014

School

Number   in 2012

School

Number   in 2013

School

Number   in 2014

Florida   State

89

Georgetown

122

Georgetown

113

Georgetown

85

George   Wash.

93

George Wash.

97

George   Wash.

63

Florida   St.

90

Arizona St.

66

Columbia

58

Emory

75

Idaho

57

Mich. State

54

Arizona   State

73

Cal. Berkeley

55

NYU

53

American

68

NYU

53

American

49

Texas

59

Emory

50

Cardozo

48

Columbia

52

Columbia

46

Loyola Marymount

46

NYU

47

American

44

Rutgers   - Camden

42

Minnesota

45

UCLA

44

Minnesota

42

Arizona

44

Wash. Univ.

44

Arizona   State

42

Northwestern

44

Texas

43

Cal. Berkeley

41

UCLA

41

Minnesota

37

Emory

41

Cardozo

38

Northwestern

35

UCLA

39

Southern   Cal.

37

Harvard

33

Northwestern

38

Utah

34

Mich. State

33

Florida

37

Harvard

34

Loyola Marymount

32

Maryland

34

Florida

33

Florida State

31

Michigan

33

Cal. Berkeley

32

Southern   Cal.

30

SMU

31

Wash Univ.

31

Miami

29

Harvard

31

 

 

 

 

 

Largest Law Schools by Transfers as Percentage of Previous First-Year Class

2012-2014 

School

% 2012

School

% 2013

School

% 2014

 

Florida St.

44.5

Florida State

48.1

Arizona State

51.6

Arizona State

24.6

Arizona State

48

Idaho

51.4

Michigan State

17.5

Utah

34.7

Washington Univ.

23.3

Utah

17.5

Emory

29.6

Emory

22.9

Minnesota

17.1

Arizona

28.9

Georgetown

20.8

Emory

16.5

Minnesota

22

George Wash.

20.2

Cal. Berkeley

16.2

George Wash.

21.8

Cal. Berkeley

19.4

Rutgers - Camden

14.9

Georgetown

21.2

Florida St.

18.2

Georgetown

14.7

Rutgers – Camden

20.7

Rutgers - Camden

17.1

Southern Cal.

14.7

Southern Cal.

19.7

Southern Cal.

17.1

Northwestern

14.4

Texas

19.1

Minnesota

16.7

Cincinnati

14.3

Cincinnati

17.5

Utah

15.9

Columbia

14.3

Northwestern

17.1

Northwestern

15.3

Buffalo

14.2

Washington Univ.

15.4

UCLA

15

Arizona

14

Univ. Washington

15.3

Seton Hall

14.5

Cardozo

13.8

Columbia

14.2

Florida Int.

13.9

SMU

13.4

American

13.8

Texas

13.5

Florida

12.7

SMU

13.3

Columbia

13.1

Chicago

12.6

UCLA

13.3

Richmond

12.8

George Wash.

12.5

Chicago

13

Univ. Washington

12.6

 

 

 

 

Houston

12.6

 

Note that in these two charts, the “repeat players” -- those schools in the top 20 for all three years -- are bolded.  In  2013 and 2014, nine of the top ten schools for number of transfers repeated.  (The notable newcomer this year is Idaho, which received 55 transfers from the Concordia University School of Law when Concordia did not receive provisional accreditation from the ABA.)  Across all three years, eight of the top ten schools for percentage of transfers repeated.

Top Ten Law Schools as a Percentage of All Transfers

 

2006

2011

2012

2013

2014

Total Transfers

482

570

587

724

625

Transfers to 10 Schools with Most   Transfers

2265

2427

2438

2501

2187

Transfers to 10 Schools with Most   Transfers as % of   Transfers

21.3%

23.5%

24.1%

28.9%

28.6%

 

The chart above demonstrates an increasing concentration in the transfer market between 2006 and 2014 and even moreso between 2012 and 2014, as the ten law schools with the most students transferring captured an increasing share of the transfer market. 

NATIONAL AND REGIONAL MARKETS BASED ON NEW DATA

Starting this fall, the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar began collecting and requiring schools with more than five transfers in to report not only the number of students who have transferred in, but also the schools from which they came (indicating the number from each school) along with the 75%, 50% and 25% first-year, law school GPAs of the pool of students who transferred in to a given school (provided that at least twelve students transferred in to the school).  This allows us to begin to explore the nature of the transfer market by looking at where students are coming from and are going and by looking at the first-year GPA profile of students transferring in to different law schools. 

Percentage of Transfers from Within Geographic Region and Top Feeder School(s)

USNews

Ranking

School

# Transfers

Region

Regional

Transfers

Reg. %

Feeder

Schools

#

2

Harvard

33

NE

6

18

Emory-Wash. Univ.

3

4

Columbia

46

NE

19

41

Brooklyn

5

6

NYU

50

NE

20

40

Cornell

8

9

Berkeley

55

CA

43

78

Hastings

18

12

Northwestern

35

MW

24

69

DePaul-Chicago Kent-Loyola

5

13

Georgetown

113

Mid-Atl

49

43

American

13

15

Texas

43

TX

27

63

Baylor

5

16

UCLA

44

CA

31

70

Loyola Marymount

8

18

Wash. Univ.

44

MW

20

45

SLU

4

19

Emory

53

SE

40

75

Atlanta’s John Marshall

20

20

GWU

97

Mid-Atl

78

80

American

54

20

Minnesota

37

MW

21

57

William Mitchell

6

20

USC

30

CA

22

73

Southwestern

5

31

Azizona St.

66

SW

51

77

Arizona Summit

44

45

Florida St.

31

SE

24

77

Florida Coastal

9

61

Miami

29

SE

21

72

Florida Coastal

5

72

American

44

Mid-Atl

14

32

Baltimore-UDC

6

87

Michigan St.

33

MD

33

100

Thomas Cooley

31

87

Loyola Marymount

32

CA

26

81

Whittier

15

 

For this set of 19 schools with the most transfer students, the vast majority obtained most of the transfers from within the geographic region within which the law school is located.   Only two schools (Harvard and American) had fewer than 40% of their transfers from within the region in which they are located and only four others (Columbia, NYU, Georgetown and Washington University) had fewer than 50% of the transfers from within their regions.  Meanwhile, ten of the 19 schools had 70% or more of their transfers from within the region in which the school is located. 

Moreover, several schools had a significant percentage of their transfers from one particular feeder school.  For Berkeley, roughly 33% of its transfers came from Hastings; for Emory, nearly 40% of its transfers came from Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School; for George Washington, over 55% of its transfers came from American; for Arizona State, 67% of its transfers came from Arizona Summit; for Michigan State nearly 95% of its transfers came from Thomas Cooley; for Loyola Marymount, nearly 50% of its transfers came from Whittier; and for Idaho, over 95% of its transfers came from Concordia.

 Percentage of Transfers from Different Tiers of School(s)

Along With First-Year Law School GPA 75th/50th/25th

USNews Ranking

 

# of Trans.

Top 50

# -- %

51-99

# -- %

100-146

# -- %

Unranked

            # -- %

GPA 75th

GPA 50th

GPA 25th

2

Harvard

33

23

70

10

30

0

0

0

0

3.95

3.9

3.83

4

Columbia

46

29

63

14

30

3

7

0

0

3.81

3.75

3.69

6

NYU

50

41

82

7

14

2

4

0

0

3.74

3.62

3.47

9

Berkeley

55

17

31

27

33

6

11

5

9

3.9

3.75

3.68

12

Northwestern

35

16

46

12

34

6

17

1

3

3.73

3.56

3.4

13

Georgetown

113

27

24

38

34

17

15

31

27

3.77

3.67

3.55

15

Texas

43

17

40

13

3

9

21

4

9

3.62

3.45

3.11

16

UCLA

44

15

34

23

52

2

5

4

9

3.73

3.58

3.44

18

Wash. Univ.

44

3

7

25

57

1

2

15

34

3.43

3.2

3.06

19

Emory

53

3

6

7

13

8

15

35

66

3.42

3.27

2.93

20

GWU

97

13

13

73

75

11

11

0

0

3.53

3.35

3.21

20

Minnesota

37

4

11

12

32

18

49

3

8

3.3

3.1

2.64

20

USC

30

1

3

11

37

6

20

12

40

3.71

3.59

3.44

31

Arizona St.

66

4

6

5

8

8

12

49

74

3.51

3.23

2.97

45

Florida St.

31

2

6

4

13

3

10

22

71

3.29

3.1

2.9

61

Miami

29

1

3

4

14

6

21

18

62

3.3

3.07

2.87

72

American

44

2

5

14

32

3

7

25

57

3.25

2.94

2.78

87

Michigan St.

33

0

0

0

0

1

3

32

97

3.19

3.05

2.83

87

Loyola Mary

32

0

0

0

0

1

3

31

97

3

3

3

 

The chart above shows the tiers of law schools from which the largest schools in the transfer market received their transfer students.  Thirteen of the top 19 schools for transfers are ranked in the top 20 in USNews, but of those 13, only six had 80% or more of their transfers from schools ranked between 1 and 99 in the USNews rankings – Harvard, Columbia, NYU, Northwestern, UCLA and George Washington.  Three additional schools had at least 50% of their transfers from schools ranked between 1 and 99, Berkeley, Georgetown and Washington University.  The other ten schools had at least half of their transfer students from schools ranked 100 or lower, with some schools having a significant percentage of their transfers from schools ranked alphabetically.  This data largely confirms the analysis of Bill Henderson and Jeff Rensberger regarding the rankings migration of transfers – from lower ranked schools to higher ranked schools.

In addition, as you move down the rankings of transfer schools, the general trend in first-year law school GPA shows a significant decline, with several highly-ranked schools taking a number of transfers with first-year GPAs below a 3.0, including Emory, Minnesota, Arizona State, and Florida State.

STILL MANY UNKNOWNS

This new data should be very helpful to prospective law students and to current law students who are considering transferring.  This data gives them at least a little better idea of what transfer opportunities might be available to them depending upon where they go to law school as a first-year student.

Even with this more granular data now available, however, as I noted in my earlier posting on transfer students, there still are a significant number of unknowns relating to transfer students.  These unknowns cover several different points.  

First, what is the acceptance rater for transfers?  We now know how many transferred came from different schools and we have some idea of first-year GPA ranges for those admitted as transfers, but we do not know the acceptance rate on transfers.  Are a significant percentage of transfers not admitted or are most students interested in trasnferring finding a new home someplace.

Second, what are motivations of transfers and what are the demographics of transfers?  Are transfers primarily motivated by better employment opportunities perceived to be available at the higher-ranked law school?  Are some subset of transfers primarily motivated by issues regarding family or geography (with rankings and employment outcomes as secondary concerns)?

Third, how do the employment outcomes of transfer students compare with the employment outcomes of students who started at a given law school?  Does the data support the perception that those who transfer, in fact, have better employment outcomes by virtue of transferring?

Fourth, what are the social/educational experiences of transfers in their new schools and what is the learning community impact on those schools losing a significant number of students to the transfer market?

For those interested in these issues, it might make sense to design some longitudinal research projects that could help find answers to some of these questions.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legalwhiteboard/2014/12/further-understanding-the-transfer-market-a-look-at-the-2014-transfer-data.html

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Comments

Excellent article.

Posted by: Biglaw Litigator | Dec 25, 2016 8:50:25 AM

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