Friday, May 24, 2013

University of Montana School of Law Dean Search

Professor Anthony Johnstone, a member of the Search Committee, sends along this announcement:

ImagesThe University of Montana invites applications and nominations for a Dean to lead its School of Law as it begins the second century of its distinguished history. Founded in 1912, the School of Law is an established leader in legal education, preparing students for serving people in the practice of law through effective integration of theory and practice. Beyond preparing students for practice, our curriculum emphasizes areas of law significant to the Rocky Mountain West including natural resource law, environmental law, and Indian law. At a challenging time for legal education, the success of Montana’s model in training and placing lawyers has earned it recognition as one of the best-value law schools in the nation. Montana is one of a handful of law schools to attract significantly more applicants this year than last.

The successful candidate must hold a Juris Doctor degree, or its equivalent, from an ABA-accredited law school, demonstrate the ability to lead the School of Law’s faculty, staff, and students, and have the following additional qualifications:
- Distinguished professional achievement in legal practice;
- Successful administrative experience, including personnel supervision and financial administration;
- Strong listening, communication, and consensus-building skills;
- A commitment to legal scholarship; and
- A commitment to diversity.

TO APPLY: Visit http://umjobs.silkroad.com/ to view full description and apply online. Candidates will be asked to upload: a statement of interest; a current resume or C.V.; and contact information for at least three professional references.   Review of applications will begin on August 1, 2013; application review will continue until the position is filled.

ADA/EOE/AA/Veteran's Preference Employer

Professor Johnstone adds:  "We are a small, agile school with a long tradition of innovation. We've also managed to provide quality, affordable legal education that employers appreciate. It includes a well-established curriculum that begins with an innovative skills-based law-firm program in the first year, continues with intensive trial and transactional simulation courses in the second year, and finishes with a required third-year clinical program offering professional placements at both in-house law clinics and government and public-interest law offices.

"We're thriving relative to most schools--at last count our applications are up 10.5% this year--but we want to continue to stay ahead of the curve!"

[Jeff Lipshaw]

May 24, 2013 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 20, 2013

The Calculus of University Presidents

Money-bagsThis week's National Law Journal has a Special Report section on the challenges facing law schools.  Karen Sloan has several stories on how law schools are finding alternative sources of revenues beyond tuition dollars for JD degrees (masters's degrees for nonlawyers, online LLMs, and lawyer executive education).  

I contributed an essay entitled "The Calculus of University Presidents."  Although the essay is posed as the letter I would write to a university president seeking advice on how to handle a significant, unexpected shortfall in law school revenues, the intended audience is lawyers and legal educators seeking to get a handle on the brutal economics that are now threatening the survival of a large swath of law schools.  

From the perspective of many, it would be nice if things would go back to the way they used to be. But that is not going to happen.  Good lawyers understand that we gain no long-term advantage from hiding from these facts. Instead, we need to confront them honestly and proactively.

[posted by Bill Henderson]

May 20, 2013 in Blog posts worth reading, Current events, Data on legal education, Data on the profession, New and Noteworthy, Structural change | Permalink | Comments (2)