Thursday, August 29, 2013

Faculty Hiring Announcement - Suffolk University Law School

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL in Boston invites applications for a tenure-track position starting in the 2014-2015 academic year.  We seek entry-level and pre-tenure laterals with strong academic records and a demonstrated commitment to excellence in teaching and scholarship. Our search will focus on candidates with expertise or developing interest in business law, including but not limited to business entities, corporate finance, banking law, or securities regulation. Candidates’ teaching and research areas may also include advanced business topics in business planning or similar transactionally-oriented business subjects. Candidates may also be asked to teach a first year course. Suffolk University is an equal opportunity employer. We encourage applications from women, persons of color, sexual orientation minorities and others who will contribute to the diversity of the faculty.  Interested candidates should contact Professors Jessica Silbey and Robert Smith, Co-Chairs, Faculty Appointments Committee, at jsilbey@suffolk.edu and rsmith@suffolk.edu, with a copy to bmello@suffolk.edu, or mail their materials to Co-Chairs of the Appointments Committee, c/o Babs Mello, at Suffolk University Law School, 120 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 02108-4677.

August 29, 2013 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 22, 2013

The First Day of Law School - From My Side of the Podium

During the summers, I usually spend a lot more time around horses and dogs than I do around students.  About this time of year, probably because of the impending transition back to the classroom and dealing with humans, it seems like I always go back to one of my favorite movies, Buck, about the horse trainer Buck Brannaman.  

51rrqhjvvl_aa160__med_hrFive minutes into the movie, he's beginning a "colt starting" class, in which horse owners are learning how to get horses who've never been saddled, much less ridden, to accept the rider.  He narrates:  "Colt starting is always interesting because most of the youngsters never been saddled, never had anyone on their back, or a bit in their mouth, so there’s a lot of fear in both the horse and the human."  

Then the film cuts to his opening remarks to the owners who are themselves going to have to teach their horses:

“The way I do these colt classes, you guys, you’ll have to get ’em exposed to a lot of things that seem perfectly normal to you but it doesn’t seem normal to the horse.
“You walk up to ’em smelling like a Big Mac, you know, or somethin.’ Your diet is gonna make you smell different to the horse.
“And then you’re gonna tell the horse, ‘don’t worry, I want to crawl on you’ … in a similar posture to how a lion would attack and kill a horse. They jump right up in the middle of them and they reach their front claws around and as they’re biting down on their spine they’re cutting their throat with their claws. You’re asking the horse to let you be in that posture and crawl on him.
"And then about the time he says, ‘Alright, maybe,’ and then you say, ‘Oh one more thing. I want to strap some hides of other dead animals around you before I crawl on you.’
"Damn sure have to have some trust. He’s got to believe in you to let you do that. And amazingly enough, they’ll let you do it.”
I'm pretty sure there's a lesson there for all teachers, but particularly law professors facing a class of 1Ls on the first day. 

August 22, 2013 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, August 5, 2013

Help Wanted: To ReInvent Bar Associations -- August 9th in San Francisco

Scale_of_justice_2_newTwo constituencies are really worried about their futures.  The first is law students and recent law graduates --  they are worried about jobs.  The second are state and local bar associations  --  they are worried about being relevant to the next generation of lawyers.  

So here is my idea.  The new guard and the old guard should be talking to each other.  It does not take a rocket scientist to see the real opportunity for synergy.  If  all of us are willing to step outside our comfort zone -- just a little -- we can create new types of bar association events where young lawyers come to have fun, contribute to the community and profession, and develop relationships that put their careers on a clear upward track. 

BossoneToward that end, this week's ABA Annual Meeting in San Francisco provides us with a golden opportunity.  On Friday, August 9 at 8 a.m. at the Hilton SF Union Square, Michael Bossone (co-creator of LawWithoutWalls) and I will be facilitating a plenary session entitled, "A New Age for the Legal Profession Requires a New Age for Bar Associations."  

Well, we could not preside over a session where panels of white guys, 50 and older (my own demographic), sit at a head table and opine on the likes and needs of millennial lawyers.  So we have invited a large cadre of law students and recent law grads to take part in a more interactive session. The session is big -- nearly 300 bar association presidents and executives from around the country.  And we need 1 to 2 students or recent grads per table -- perhaps for the first time, you are the subject matter experts.  Michael and I are looking for a few more qualified volunteers. Interested?

If you are proximate to SF and looking to meet some well-connected lawyers from around the nation who are genuinely interested in listening to your (constructive) point of view, please send me an email with #NewAgeBar (our Twitter hashtag) in the subject line.  We have a few slots left -- RSVPs are mandated for this event, as space is limited and name tags are required.

GettingajobIf you are a law student or recent law grad and you think going to a bar association event early on a Friday morning is a grand waste of time, I suggest that you read  Mark Granovetter's classic book, Getting a Job.  This book is a vivid empirical demonstration of Granovetter's seminal 1973 article, "The Strength of Weak Ties," which is one of the most cited social science articles of all time (23,000+ citations and counting).

An example of a strong tie is you and your sorority or faternity friends. Not too good for getting a job.  An example of a weak tie might be an acquaintance in the same profession but part of a different generation or living in a different part of the country.  As Granovetter shows, these "weak" ties act as bridges and are profoundly influential in opening doors for people.  Believe it or not, academic knowledge can accelerate your career.  Get out of your comfort zone and give it try.

[posted by Bill Henderson]

August 5, 2013 in Current events, Fun and Learning in the classroom, New and Noteworthy | Permalink | Comments (1)