Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Writing Tip of the Week

Writing Persuasive Headings

Last week, I stressed the importance of articulating the structure of your brief or memo.  One of the most important parts of showing the structure of your writing is headings.  In a persuasive brief, a heading tells your reader what is in the section or subsection, it introduces your arguments, and it persuades.   In addition, the judge should be able to read the headings in your table of contents and get a clear idea of your arguments.  Finally, everything in a section or subsection should relate to the heading or subheading.  If it doesn't, the section needs to be revised or the heading rewritten.

A good persuasive heading should contain a conclusion, the law, the facts, and why.  (of course, some of these overlap.)  The why or because is especially important.  The heading should be as focused and specific as possible.

Example.

I. THE COURT HAS PERSONAL JURISDICTION OVER MR. AARON BECAUSE HE ESTABLISHED MINIMUM CONTACTS WITH ALABAMA WHEN HE SIGNED A CONTRACT WITH AN ALABAMA COMPANY.

(esf)

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legal_skills/2011/06/writing-tip-of-the-week-4.html

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