Thursday, April 28, 2011

Nicholas Carr's "The Shallows" is finalist for 2011 Pulitzer Prize

Ok, maybe this is a little dated but it was news to me until this week. It's really a worthwhile read for every teacher. From the publisher's summary:

Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic—a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption—and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection.

Part intellectual history, part popular science, and part cultural criticism, The Shallows sparkles with memorable vignettes—Friedrich Nietzsche wrestling with a typewriter, Sigmund Freud dissecting the brains of sea creatures, Nathaniel Hawthorne contemplating the thunderous approach of a steam locomotive—even as it plumbs profound questions about the state of our modern psyche. This is a book that will forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.

Hat tip to the Harvard Business Review.

(jbl).

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legal_skills/2011/04/nicholas-carrs-the-shallows-is-finalist-for-2011-pulitzer-prize.html

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