Thursday, November 29, 2012

A Good Day In D.C.

In a display of efficiency all too uncommon in the D.C. bar disciplinary system, the District of Columbia Court of Appeals imposed reciprocal discipline in seven matters without referring a single one to the Board on Professional Responsibility ("BPR").

The seven cases can be found at this link.  

The most interesting one of the bunch is a case from Massachusetts in which the court imposed a two-year suspension with fitness.

As reflected in this summary from the Massachusetts Board of Bar Overseers, the attorney had falsely claimed that she had a medical degree to her law firm. The law firm then relied on the false representation in marketing her services.

Under the prior reciprocal discipline rules, these cases all would have gone to the BPR for a recommendation. Bar CouIt would have used up limited resources, taken years to decide and perhaps even resulted in contested litigation before the court. (Mike Frisch)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legal_profession/2012/11/in-a-display-of-efficiency-all-too-uncommon-in-the-dc-bar-disciplinary-system-the-district-of-columbia-court-of-appeals-im.html

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