Monday, October 31, 2011

I Fought The Law

An attorney admitted to the Massachusetts Bar in 2006 failed to disclose a serious traffic incident in a series of applications for bar admission.

He did not report a 1999 incident where he was charged with leaving the scene of a property damage accident, driving while uninsured and on a suspended license. The charges were dismissed after he made restitution.

The attorney "mistakenly and unreasonably" believed that he was not obligated to report the incident because the charges were eventually dismissed.

He has now been suspended for 15 months retroactive to a previously-imposed interim suspension.

According to the Board of Bar Overseers summary of the matter, his problems with the law continued after his admission:

The respondent was admitted to the bar on June 21, 2006. On July 11, 2008, he admitted
to sufficient facts in Taunton District Court to possession of a Class B drug in violation of G.L.
c. 94C, § 34. The case was continued without a finding to July 10, 2009. On July 31, 2008, the
respondent admitted to sufficient facts in Taunton District Court to violating an abuse prevention
order in violation of G.L. c. 209A, § 7. The person who had the restraining order had initiated
the contact with the respondent. The case was continued without a finding for three months, but
the respondent was found in violation of probation on April 12, 2010, and the respondent’s
probation was extended for another four months. On September 17, 2008, the respondent
admitted to sufficient facts in Taunton District Court to concealing, selling, or pledging leased
personalty, a laptop, in violation of G.L. c. 266, § 87. That case was continued without a finding
for six months, and the respondent was ordered to pay restitution of $1,574.55 to Rent-A-Center.
The respondent was found in violation of probation in this matter, and his probation was
extended for four months. On March 2, 2010, the respondent was convicted of unlicensed
operation of a motor vehicle and was fined $100. Except for the March 2010 conviction, the
respondent violated S. J. C. Rule 4:01, § 12(8), by not reporting these convictions as defined by
S. J. C. Rule 4:01, § 12(1), to bar counsel.

Violation of an abuse prevention order and concealing, selling, or pledging leased
personalty are “serious crimes"...

(Mike Frisch)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legal_profession/2011/10/an-attorney-admitted-to-the-massachusetts-bar-in-2006-failed-to-disclose-a-traffic-incident-in-a-series-of-applications-for-b.html

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