Tuesday, October 31, 2006

The Texas Chain Gang Massacre & Incompetent Representation: Old Cases Make Bad Lawyering

A previous post on Texas death penalty appointments [here] had linked to an Austin newspaper expose Sunday detailing incompetent state habeas/appellate representation of capital defendants.  The next part of this "Writs gone wrong" series included this story on how hard it is for even the very good current lawyers in such appeals to do a good job when the cases are so old and the files not easily navigated.  They are stuck with a lot of errors not of their making.  Further, the 'How Appealing' blog, at here, includes helpful links to the rest of this important series, and it lists other topics covered.  It also, in unrelated Texas ethics news, quotes and links elsewhere in the blog an op-ed from the Fort Worth paper that begins, "The ruling exonerating Texas Supreme Court Justice Nathan Hecht of ethical violations gives new definition to the word tortuous."  [Alan Childress]

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legal_profession/2006/10/texas_death_row.html

Ethics, Professional Responsibility | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef00d8356c6c0369e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The Texas Chain Gang Massacre & Incompetent Representation: Old Cases Make Bad Lawyering:

Comments

Post a comment