Monday, September 18, 2006

Jeff's Trivial Spongeesque Mind?

To test Jeff's claim to spongeworthiness, I ask him, and anyone really, this highly geekish question:  Of all the cases cited in the U.S. Reports, over centuries of U.S. Supreme Court decision-making, one case is cited more than any other.  Even Leiter has not yet counted this.  Jeff, name that case.

Hint:  it is not Marbury v. Madison. 

UPDATE:  Jeff gave up too early and Frank Snyder got it, in the hand grenade sense.  I'll leave the answer for the Comments just in case you stumbled on this.

--Alan Childress

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legal_profession/2006/09/your_trvial_spo.html

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Comments

Here's a guess: Erie RR v. Tompkins.

Posted by: Jeff Lipshaw | Sep 18, 2006 11:01:43 AM

Great guess. Not so.

Posted by: Alan Childress | Sep 19, 2006 11:12:48 AM

I'll give you a hint, or at least a teaser. It is the kind of perfect trivia question where, when you hear the answer, you say Of course. Like what 3 TV shows shown in the 1970s were set in the 1950s? Everyone always gets Happy Days and Laverne & Shirley, but the third one is tricky until you hear it, then you say Duh. It is not Joanie Loves Chachi, which showed in the 1980s and was set in the 1960s.

Posted by: Alan Childress | Sep 19, 2006 3:25:54 PM

How about MIRANDA v. ARIZONA? Perhaps BROWN v. BOARD OF EDUCATION? Hmmmmmm. ROE v. WADE? (I'll limit myself to three strikes.)

P.S. Looking forward to this blog!

Posted by: tim zinnecker | Sep 23, 2006 4:08:10 PM

Celotex?

Posted by: Jane Hicks | Sep 29, 2006 11:28:44 AM

How about Chevron? Cass Sunstein says it overrules Marbury!

Posted by: Frank | Sep 29, 2006 2:20:58 PM

I think it's that case in the headnotes that's always there for the point that says the headnotes and stuff aren't part of the opinion. Since contracts profs never read Supreme Court opinions, I don't know the name.

Posted by: Frank Snyder | Sep 29, 2006 2:46:54 PM

Congrats, Frank Snyder. The syllabus shall constitute no portion of the opinion of this Court. UNITED STATES v. DETROIT LUMBER CO.

Posted by: Childress | Sep 29, 2006 2:55:54 PM

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