Thursday, April 5, 2012

What's Buried Under Dodger Stadium?

A front-page story in today's LA Times throws some cold water on the celebratory mood surrounding the recent sale of the Los Angeles Dodgers and the upcoming 50th anniversary of Dodger Stadium in Chavez Ravine. The story recounts how the city of Los Angeles acquired the land to build the stadium by uprooting (through the use of eminent domain) more than 1,000 mostly Mexican-American families who lived in the area.  The story concludes with a chilling quote from one of the uprooted: "There's an old Mexican custom that where you're born, the umbilical cord is buried. Mine's buried under third base....And I hate home runs, 'cause every time they step on third base, my stomach hurts."  The story of Chavez Ravine has been well told before, including by my friend Matt Parlow in his article Unintended Consequences: Eminent Domain and Affordable Housing, 46 Santa Clara L. Rev. 841, 843–46 (2006).

Ken Stahl 

April 5, 2012 in California, Eminent Domain, History, Local Government, Redevelopment, Urbanism | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

NPR on Demolition of Vacant and Abandoned Homes

On today's Morning Edition, NPR broadcast this story by WCPN on Cleveland's ramping up of demolition of vacant and abandoned properties.  The piece features a sound bite from Jim Rokakis, the dynamic founder of Cleveland's new county-wide land bank, which is using part of the $75 million that Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has appropriated for vacant house demolition from the State's share of the $25 billion AG settlement with five major mortgage lenders.  Rokakis wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post earlier this year urging national action on demolition funding.

As co-chair, with South Bend's new mayor, Pete Buttigieg, of the City's Vacant and Abandoned Property Task Force, I would have loved to see Indiana follow Ohio's lead, but last month the Legislature here decided to use its AG settlement money to resolve funding issues it was facing with the home energy assistance fund. 

For those interested in the land use implications of responses to vacant and abandoned property issues, you may also want to check out the stories NPR has done on land banking and "blotting" (the creation of multi-parcel open spaces in dense urban neighborhoods).   As always, the Center for Community Progress is a great general resource on all things vacant and abandoned.

Jim K.

April 5, 2012 in Density, Mortgage Crisis, Nuisance, Redevelopment | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Fennell Helps us Picture Takings

One of my (few) disappointments this semester was that I was out of town the day Lee Fennell (Chicago) came to ND Law to present a really interesting paper broadening legal theory's view of resource-allocation-relevant costs beyond the conventional focus on "transaction costs."  I did have the consolation of hearing many terrific papers at the ALPS Conference at Georgetown on the day she presented here in South Bend. Hopefully, that paper, Resource Access Costs, will be finding its way to SSRN and this blog soon.  

In the meantime, she has posted Picturing Takings, 88 Notre Dame L. Rev ___ (forthcoming 2012), an article that makes visual sense of a doctrine that has so successfully defied textual explanatory efforts. Here's the abstract:

Takings doctrine, we are constantly reminded, is unclear to the point of incoherence. The task of finding our way through it has become more difficult, and yet more interesting, with the Supreme Court’s recent, inconclusive foray into the arena of judicial takings in Stop the Beach Renourishment. Following guideposts in Kelo, Lingle, and earlier cases, this essay uses a series of simple diagrams to examine how elements of takings jurisprudence fit together with each other and with other limits on governmental action. Visualizing takings in this manner yields surprising lessons for judicial takings and for takings law more generally. [Note: a PowerPoint version of the diagrams is available on the author's faculty webpage or can be obtained by emailing the author]. 

 I am very hopeful that this article will be helpful not only to my understanding of takings but also to my (first-time) teaching of Land Use Planning next spring. Here is a link to the PowerPoint presentation referred to at the end of the abstract.

Jim K.

April 4, 2012 in Eminent Domain, Inverse Condemnation, Judicial Review, Scholarship, Takings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

After the Zombie Apocalypse

I was mildly surprised, upon checking my mailbox a few Mondays ago, to find a zombie crawling out of it. My excitement at finally getting to use my zombie apocalypse skills quickly faded when I realized that it was just an article by Allen Best in High Country News about Teton County, Idaho and its “zombie subdivisions.”


We’ve written a lot about Teton County and similar rural or exurban areas (my own take is here), so the basic story is familiar. Beginning in about 1990, amenity-driven population growth substantially increased the value of land in many rural areas, leading to a boom in residential development that “bust” in 2007 and 2008. That bust left behind thousands of acres of partially developed subdivisions, empty houses, and roads to nowhere across rural and exurban America – Maricopa, AZ; Rio Vista, CA; Myrtle Beach, NC, and of course, Teton County, ID (and here, and here, and... well, just wander around on Google Maps yourself). To the extent the zombie subdivisions have a positive aspect, however, it is in how they make obvious the detrimental effects of particular land-use choices, and perhaps motivate new choices. Maybe we’ll emerge wiser, more careful, and better able to imagine the consequences of our choices.


So we know that part of the story. Short of an ugly photo of a zombie, what does High Country News have to add? Its contribution to the conversation is small but very significant, and it is perfectly distilled in a single quote by long-time Idaho farmer: “I see bicycle riders here, young people riding in the middle of the day!”


Rural geographers (and others) speak of a concept they characterize as “re-territorialization”—the reassignment of resource access rights, and local or regional cultural hegemony, to a new population or interest group. In the public lands West, we see it in changing notions of the purpose of federally-managed lands, e.g., from resource extraction to amenity consumption. But it is no less important in the changing power structures and community visions that allocate rights in private lands.

The Idaho farmer’s bewilderment that people might be able to ride bicycles during the middle of the day, rather than be driving a tractor, represents a persistent understanding about place and what that place should look like. It is also an understanding increasingly overwhelmed, and perhaps disrespected, by emerging majorities. Our choices to formalize cultural transitions into law necessarily oppress reasonable perspectives about land, the appropriate allocation of particular interests in land, and the “sense” of a community. But in many cases these perspectives are fundamental aspects of a place’s cultural history. They are also fundamental aspects of what the rest of us understand as, and love about, rurality.


So while this insight isn’t particularly earth-shattering, it does seem that the zombie apocalypse forces us to focus more carefully on a specific question: To what extent should our new choices respect the cultural understandings that gave rise to the old choices we want to undo? Put another way, can we both love and protect the old rural while simultaneously eradicating the perspectives that created it?

Jerry Long

April 4, 2012 in Community Design, Exurbs, Planning, Sprawl, Subdivision Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Hail and Farewell: Introducing Jerrold Long

Time for another new guest blogger!  First, let me give a sincere, belated thanks to Susan Kraham who had some really interesting posts last month here at the Land Use Prof Blog.

I also want to extend a warm welcome Professor Jerrold A. Long for the upcoming month.  JerroldLongProf. Long is on the faculty of the University of Idaho College of Law, where he teaches courses in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Property, and is also affilated with the water resources and bioregional planning programs.  He has a JD from Colorado and a PhD from Wisconsin.  From his faculty bio page:

Jerrold A. Long returned to Idaho to join the faculty at the College of Law in 2007. He teaches land-use law, environmental law, property, and subjects relating to the interdisciplinary “Water of the West” program at the University of Idaho. Professor Long is also an Affiliate Professor in the University’s Water Resources and Bioregional Planning programs.

Professor Long grew up in Rexburg, Idaho. He attended Utah State University where he was a National Merit Scholar and graduated magna cum laude in 1997 with a B.S. in Biology. Professor Long received his J.D. degree from the University of Colorado School of Law in 2000. He was president of his first-year class and associate editor of the Colorado Journal of International Environmental Law & Policy. While in law school, Professor Long served as an intern for Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund in Honolulu, Hawai`i, and worked for the U.S. Department of Justice, General Litigation Section, Environmental & Natural Resources Division. After law school, Professor Long joined the Cheyenne office of the western regional law firm Holland & Hart LLP. At Holland & Hart, Professor Long’s practice focused on environmental compliance and litigation before the U.S. Department of Interior Board of Land Appeals. Most recently, Professor Long attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he was an instructor, Distinguished Graduate Fellow, and earned a Doctorate degree from the interdisciplinary Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. Professor Long’s dissertation – New West or Same West?: Evolving land-use institutions in the American West – explored how local land-use regimes respond to social and cultural change.

Professor Long lives in Moscow with his wife Jessica and sons Kieran and Kelton. He is an avid cyclist and wanderer.

We've featured his recent scholarship a couple of times this year, including his forthcoming articles Overcoming Neoliberal Hegemony in Community Development: Law, Planning, and Selected Lamarckism, and Waiting for Hohfeld: Property Rights, Property Privileges, and the Physical Consequences of Word ChoiceWe're very pleased he can join us for the month!

Matt Festa

April 4, 2012 in Planning, Scholarship, Water | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 2, 2012

Claeys on Locke and Productive Use

Eric R. Claeys (George Mason) has another new paper out: Locke Unlocked: Productive Use in Trespass, Adverse Possession, and Labor Theory.  The abstract:

Most American property scholars acknowledge that “Of Property,” chapter 5 of John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government, deserves a significant place in the canon of property theory. Virtually all of those scholars, however, understand Of Property in one of several manners that trivialize its argument. This Article draws on scholarship published in the last 20 years in political philosophy and intellectual history, by scholars who understand Locke to propound a theory of labor called here “productive labor theory.” Productive labor theory judges legal and other normative institutions by how effectively the domains of freedom they create in relation to external assets help a wide range of citizens extract from those assets benefits likely to contribute to their rational flourishing.

This Article restates the main tenets of productive labor theory as propounded in that political-philosophy and intellectual-history scholarship. To make productive labor theory concrete, the Article illustrates how it applies to the prima facie case of trespass to land, the remedies for ongoing encroachments, and adverse possession and a few other common defenses to trespass. To situate productive labor theory in relation to legal academics’ impressions, the Article contrasts productive labor theory with act utilitarianism, with the libertarian rendition of Lockean worked out by Robert Nozick in Anarchy, State, and Utopia (1974), and with the labor-desert claims commonly associated with section 27 of the Second Treatise.

Matt Festa

April 2, 2012 in Property, Property Rights, Property Theory, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)