Thursday, August 26, 2010

America's Ten Dead Cities

From time to time here on the land use prof blog we post a link to one of the ubiquitous "top" lists that various media outlets like to publish about America's top cities for business, living, etc.  I see a lot of these because a trend in recent years has been for Texas cities to dominate these lists, at least when they are based on economics.  Here's a related, but more depressing list: America's Ten Dead Citiesfrom the site 24/7 Wall Street.  The cities:  

(1) Buffalo; (2) Flint; (3) Hartford; (4) Cleveland; (5) New Orleans; (6) Detroit; (7) Albany; (8) Atlantic City; (9) Allentown; (10) Galveston.

Read the story to get a sense of the narrative arcs of these once-prosperous cities fallen on harder times. Mostly, it won't surpise you.  Other than the two Gulf Coast cities on the list (both of which (#5 & 10) I still visit regularly), they are mostly post-industrial Northeast or Great Lakes cities (including my birthplace (#8), my hometown (#7), and another place I lived as an adult (#4)).  Of course, Billy Joel was already lamenting the decline of #9 back in 1982 (come to think of it, Bruce Springsteen told a pretty dark tale about #8 before that).  It's interesting for us not only because of how much city economies have driven land use planning, but also because we need to consider the historical trajectory of these cities when considering policies to shape cities going forward.  

Matt Festa

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/land_use/2010/08/americas-ten-dead-cities.html

Detroit, Downtown, Economic Development, History, Local Government, New York, Texas | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef0133f35aa286970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference America's Ten Dead Cities:

Comments

Matt -

And yet, per a post I wrote earlier this year:

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/land_use/industrial-regulation/

in the Allentown area, Bethlehem is beginning to prosper in the footprint of the former steel factory. "Dead" might be a bit premature...

Posted by: Jamie Baker Roskie | Aug 27, 2010 12:24:21 PM