Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Herbert on the History of Higher Ed Collective Bargaining

Bill Herbert (Hunter College) recently did an interview with Radio Higher Ed: "A Primer on Unionization and Collective Bargaining in U.S. higher Education Institutions." According to the summary:

This primer on collective bargaining in higher education traces historical developments of unionization in public and private institutions as well as among tenure track, non-tenure-track faulty and graduate students. In the last five years, unionization activity has increased over 25% in the private sector, mostly in adjunct faculty units. While institutions can participate in voluntary collective bargaining activities, agreements in a formal collective bargaining context include clear rules applicable to the entire bargaining unit and enforcement mechanisms. The emergence of micro bargaining units (department level activity), and specifics of the unionization process are discussed. Specific unions that work with higher education institutions are named. Mandatory subjects in the collective bargaining process include salary, hours, healthcare, pension, professional development grievance, antidiscrimination, academic freedom, tenure, use of facilities, appointment and reappointment details, leaves, holidays, evaluations, personnel files, disciplinary actions, research and fellowship monies. Institutions may resist unionization due to flexibility limitations, institutional concept of shared governance and fiscal implications that may result from compensation negotiations. It is likely that unionization will continue to increase for non-tenure track faculty in the private sector. Regularity of access to faculty by students may be aided by collective bargaining.

Check it out!

-Jeff Hirsch 

 

March 28, 2017 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law, Public Employment Law, Union News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 27, 2017

Bales on Resurrecting Labor

Our own Rick Bales (Ohio Northern) has just posted on SSRN his new article, Resurrecting Labor, which will be published int he Maryland Law Review. The abstract:

Participation in American labor unions have changed radically, albeit incrementally, over the last fifty years. Private-sector union density has declined five-fold, whereas public-sector density has increased almost as significantly. Today, unions rarely strike and in much of the country they are politically impotent. As traditional manufacturing declines and is replaced by on-demand work, unions risk becoming a historical footnote.

This article ties the decline in union density and power to macroeconomic trends that are highly troubling in an advanced democracy, such as rising income inequality and the failure of wage growth to keep pace with GDP growth. It next reviews the traditional prescriptions that labor scholars have advocated to reverse labor’s decline. Finally, it proposes three new radical fixes: authorizing criminal prosecution for willful violations of labor law, expanding labor protections to on-demand workers, and reversing the legal presumption that workers are not represented by a union unless they affirmatively opt in.

Rick has some interesting recommendations in the article, so definitely worth checking out.

-Jeff Hirsch

March 27, 2017 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Supreme Court Rules Against NLRB in Vacancies Act Case

Supreme CourtYesterday, the Supreme Court ruled (6-2) in NLRB v. SW General. The Court held that once President Obama nominated Lafe Solomon to be the NLRB's General Counsel, he could no longer serve in his current capacity as Acting General Counsel. This is because of a provision in the Federal Vacancies Act which says that someone can only serve in an acting capacity for a covered position if they served as first assistant to that position for at least 90 days in the previous year. Because Solomon was the Acting GC--not its first assistant--when nominated, he could not continue as Acting GC.

The two dissenters (Sotomayor & Ginsburg) would have held that this provision applies only to individuals who are first appointed as acting officials--not, as was the case with Solomon, those who were already acting once nominated. In addition to a textualist argument, they stressed historical examples similar to what happened with Solomon as well as the history of the Federal Vacancies Act, which was prompted by President Clinton's nomination of Bill Lan Lee to the DOJ's Department of Civil Rights. Scotusblog has a an informative description of the case.

Under the decision, once the President nominated Solomon, he became ineligible to serve as Acting GC. This begs the larger question: what to do about all of his actions during that time (Jan. 5, 2011-Nov. 4, 2013)? Unless I missed it in the decision, the Court doesn't say anything about the practical consequences of its decision. As a result, its probably best to consult the D.C. Circuit decision, which the Court affirmed. That case vacated an unfair labor practice charge. But what of all of the other functions of the GC's office?  For instance the certification of elections?  Theoretically, this could be an issue for a host of other actions. The D.C. Circuit noted that the NLRB could have, but didn't, argue that the ULP in SW General was made by a regional director acting upon a delegation of authority from Solomon. If challenged, I would expect the NLRB to raise that argument, at least with regard to non-ULP cases, and maybe those too. But the NLRB may not have to rely solely on this argument. At the end of the D.C. Circuit's decision, it emphasized what it saw as an important limiting feature of its decision:

Finally, we emphasize the narrowness of our decision. We hold that the former Acting General Counsel of the NLRB, Lafe Solomon, served in violation of the FVRA from January 5, 2011 to November 4, 2013. But this case is not Son of Noel Canning and we do not expect it to retroactively undermine a host of NLRB decisions. We address the FVRA objection in this case because the petitioner raised the issue in its exceptions to the ALJ decision as a defense to an ongoing enforcement proceeding. We doubt that an employer that failed to timely raise an FVRA objection—regardless whether enforcement proceedings are ongoing or concluded—will enjoy the same success. See 29 U.S.C. § 160(e); Andrade, 729 F.2d at 1499.

This caveat notwithstanding, I do expect parties to raise SW General to try to vacate orders. I think the D.C. Circuit is right that those arguments should not prevail, but I anticipate some extra work for the NLRB to litigate this issue for a while. Also, I'm curious how many parties raised an FVRA argument--any readers have any insight on this?

-Jeff Hirsch 

 

 

March 22, 2017 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Acosta is New Labor Secretary Nominee

Today, Acostathe President announced that he is nominating Alex Acosta for Secretary of Labor. As many readers know, Acosta is a former member of the NLRB and is currently Dean at FIU's law school.

I really like this choice. Although we have substantive differences, I have a great deal of respect for Acosta. We were both at the NLRB during his short time there and it seemed to me that he always took his job and the role of the NLRA seriously; even when I disagreed with his vote, his decisions were thoughtful and reasonable. 

Stay tuned.

-Jeff Hirsch

February 16, 2017 in Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (1)

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Puzder Withdraws as Nominee for Secretary of Labor

This just in: Andrew Puzder has withdrawn his name from consideration as Secretary of Labor.  It sounds like the writing on the wall showed that he lacked enough Republican support in the Senate. It's interesting that this is the one cabinet nominee that failed. Allegations of domestic abuse was probably a factor, but his hiring of an undocumented domestic worker (and failure to pay her taxes) seemed to play a role for conservatives as well.

-Jeff Hirsch

February 15, 2017 in Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 27, 2017

Miscimarra New NLRB Chair

Yesterday, the NLRB announced that the president has appointed NLRB Member Philip Miscimarra as chairman. According to the announcement:

“It is an honor to be named NLRB Acting Chairman by the President,” Miscimarra said. “I remain committed to the task that Congress has assigned to the Board, which is to foster stability and to apply the National Labor Relations Act in an even-handed manner that serves the interests of employees, employers and unions throughout the country.”

Miscimarra also recognized former Chairman Mark Gaston Pearce for his service on the Board. Pearce will continue as a Board Member in a term expiring on August 27, 2018 and has served as a Board Member since 2010 including Chairman since 2011. The Board also currently includes Board Member Lauren McFerran, whose term expires on December 16, 2019. Two Board Member seats are currently vacant.

Miscimarra has served as a Board Member since August 7, 2013. He was nominated by President Obama on April 9, 2013, and he was approved unanimously by the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions on May 22, 2013. He was confirmed by the Senate on July 30, 2013, and his current term expires on December 16, 2017. 

Before joining the Board, Acting Chairman Miscimarra was a Senior Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton Business School in the Wharton Center for Human Resources, and a labor and employment law partner with Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP in Chicago. He also previously worked as a labor and employment attorney with Seyfarth Shaw LLP, Murphy Smith & Polk PC (now the Chicago office of Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, PC), and Reed Smith Shaw & McClay (now Reed Smith LLP). 

Miscimarra received his Juris Doctor from the University of Pennsylvania Law School; a Masters in Business Administration from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton Business School; and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Duquesne University.

I got a chance to meet Chairman Miscimarra at a conference a couple of years ago. Although we don't always agree on the issues, I thought he was very thoughtful and had some useful insights from his time in practice. 

-Jeff Hirsch

January 27, 2017 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Law Prof & Student Letter Opposing Puzder Nomination

Hugh Baran, a 3L at NYU School of Law, has organized a petition opposing Andrew Puzder's nomination as Secretary of Labor. Thus far, there are over 1,000 signatories to the letter, which among other things, states:

As students and professors at the nation’s law schools, we are united in opposition to President Trump’s nomination of CEO Andrew Puzder to lead the U.S. Department of Labor. Mr. Puzder is a fast-food CEO who led a company with a well-documented record of labor violations, wage suppression, and sexist advertising. He is unfit to lead a Department that is supposed to uphold basic labor and workplace safety standards for the nation’s wage earners.

If you want to sign or read the letter, you can find it here.

-Jeff Hirsch

January 26, 2017 in Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Labor and Employment Roundup

Some recent labor and employment stories that may be of interest:

-Jeff Hirsch

January 25, 2017 in Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 16, 2017

Sperino on the Karlo ADEA Case

On her blog, Friend of the Court, Sandra Sperino discusses the new Third Circuit decision in Karlo v. Pittsburgh Glass Works. In that case, the Third Circuit held that the ADEA permits "subgroup" disparate impact claims--that is, claims that an employer policy creates an unlawful disparate impact against a certain subgroup of a protected class.

Check it out, definitely worth a read.

-Jeff Hirsch

January 16, 2017 in Commentary, Employment Discrimination, Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 13, 2017

Supreme Court to Review D.R. Horton Rule

Supreme CourtToday, the Supreme Court announced that it would review the NLRB's D.R. Horton rule, which concludes that employment class action waivers can violate Section 8(a)(1) of the NLRA. The Court consolidated a group of cases under review that we be familiar to readers of the blog: NLRB v. Murphy Oil, Ernst & Yong v. Morris, and Epic System v. Lewis.  Should be an interesting case and here's hoping that my follow blogger Charlie Sullivan and his co-author Tim Glynn picks up a Supreme Court citation on the way.

We'll keep you posted on the oral argument and developments that follow.

-Jeff Hirsch

January 13, 2017 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (1)

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

District Court Enjoins New Overtime Salary Threshold (and Basically Holds that Salary-Basis Test is Unlawful)

 

Today, the Eastern District of Texas just issued a nationwide preliminary injunction barring application of the Department of Labor's (DOL) new minimum salary threshold for overtime exclusions under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

The decision is stunning. The court relies almost exclusively on dictionary definitions of the terms of the FLSA's overtime provisions. In so doing it states repeatedly that the FLSA's statement that the DOL may define and delimit the meaning of "administrative, exccutive, and professional" does not include the authority to set minimum salary thresholds. According to the court, the DOL can only update the duties. Thus, if an employee meets the duties of, say, an administrative employee, they should be excluded no matter their salary. However, perhaps recognizing that this line of reasoning runs contrary to decades of overtime law, the court drops a footnote saying it wasn't questioning the salary-basis test generally -- the court was addressing only the new salary threshold was under issue. But as far as I can tell, the only logical conclusion from the court's reasoning is that the salary-basis test in general is illegal (if someone sees a way around this in the decision, definitely let me know). In other words, if this decision stands, I think the only logical conclusion is that there will no longer be a salary-basis test for overtime exemptions.

-Jeff Hirsch 

November 22, 2016 in Labor and Employment News, Wage & Hour | Permalink | Comments (3)

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Child Laborers

The Washington Post has posted 20 photos from Lewis Hine, documenting child laborers from the early 1900s.  There are some really moving pictures in the collection and all of them show young children who are doing extremely hard work.  Definitely worth a look.

Of course, child labor is not unheard of even today

-JH

 

November 3, 2016 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law, Labor/Employment History | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

AALS L&E Sections Newsletter

Joey Fishkin & Joe Mastrosimone are co-chairing the labor and employment AALS sections this year and write to seek information for the joint annual newsletter. As someone who has had the pleasure of helping with this effort in the past, let me put in a plea on their behalf--please help out! The newsletter is only as good as the info provided for it, so at a minimum, fill them in on any relevant news for the year. Also, the case/legislation briefs are really helpful to readers, so please consider doing one of those as well. Joe & Joey write:

Dear Colleagues:

It is time once again for the preparation of a joint annual newsletter for the AALS Section on Employment Discrimination and the Section on Labor Relations and Employment Law, and we need your help as readers and section members. Please forward this message to any and all people you know who teach or write in the Employment Discrimination, Labor Law, and Employment Law fields.

First, if you have news of any faculty visits, lateral moves, entry-level hires, or promotions and please e-mail that news to Joseph Mastrosimone at Joseph.Mastrosimone@washburn.edu.

Second, please also e-mail Joseph Mastrosimone with any information about conference announcements and calls for papers, employment or fellowship opportunities, honors and awards, and reports on recent conferences or other events of interest to the two Sections’ members.

Third, we want to include a list of relevant employment or labor law-related publications published in 2016.  These publications can be books, articles, and chapters.  We are working on compiling a list, but it would help us make sure not to miss your publications if you would send them to us!  So, please send an email with your relevant 2016 publications to Ms. Penny Fell at Penny.Fell@washburn.edu; use the subject line “Publications for AALS Newsletter”.  (Note: please hold your forthcoming 2017 publications for next year’s newsletter.  We’re looking for 2016 publications.)

Fourth and finally, we want to solicit anyone who would be interested in writing a brief description of a recent important labor and employment case or any significant new labor or employment legislation. Your subject could be a recent Supreme Court decision (including Fisher v. University of Texas, Heffernan v. City of Paterson, Tyson Foods, Inc. v. Bouaphakeo, Green v. Brennan, etc.), a significant NLRB decision (including Columbia University, Miller & Anderson, Inc., Piedmont Gardens, etc.), a significant circuit court decision or emerging circuit split, a state supreme court decision, or an innovative and potentially influential new federal, state, or local law. The description should be fairly short — it need not be more than a couple of paragraphs, and should definitely be under 2 pages.  If you're looking for an easy way to get your name out there or want a quick outlet for your ruminations about a case or new law, this could be a good opportunity.  Please let us know what you are interested in writing about — if you would like to do this, please email Joey Fishkin at jfishkin@law.utexas.edu by October 15 to indicate your interest and say what you’d like to write about.

Thank you very much for your help!

Joe & Joey

September 14, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia, Faculty Moves, Faculty News, Faculty Presentations, Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

NLRB Decides that Gradate Students can be Covered by NLRA

NLRBToday, the NLRB issued its long-awaited decision in Columbia University. As expected, the Board--in a 3-1 decision--reversed Brown University (which was just the latest in a number of cases flip-flopping on this issue) to conclude that graduate students can be "employees" under the NLRA, as long as they had a common-law employment relationship.  According to the NLRB's announcement:

 The National Labor Relations Board issued a 3-1 decision in Columbia University that student assistants working at private colleges and universities are statutory employees covered by the National Labor Relations Act. The Graduate Workers of Columbia-GWC, UAW filed an election petition seeking to represent both graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants, along with graduate and departmental research assistants at the university in December 2014. The majority reversed Brown University (342 NLRB 483) saying it “deprived an entire category of workers of the protections of the Act without a convincing justification.”

For 45 years, the National Labor Relations Board has exercised jurisdiction over private, nonprofit universities such as Columbia. In that time, the Board has had frequent cause to apply the Act to faculty in the university setting, which has been upheld by the Supreme Court.

Federal courts have made clear that the authority to define the term “employee” rests primarily with the Board absent an exception enumerated within the National Labor Relations Act. The Act contains no clear language prohibiting student assistants from its coverage. The majority found no compelling reason to exclude student assistants from the protections of the Act.

Chairman Mark Gaston Pearce was joined by Members Kent Y. Hirozawa and Lauren McFerran in the majority opinion. Member Philip A. Miscimarra dissented in the case.

Brown had focused on a test whether the grad students were primarily students or primarily employees and, to my mind, the most important aspect of Columbia was the NLRB's rejection of that test and return to the common-law test for employment. I had always thought that Brown's refusal to use the common-law test flew in the face of Supreme Court law.

-JH

August 23, 2016 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (2)

Thursday, August 18, 2016

District Court holds RFRA trumps Title VII in gender identity case

EndaThe District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan issued a decision today on cross motions for summary judgment in EEOC v. R.G & G.R. Funeral Homes, Inc., granting summary judgment for the funeral home. The funeral home terminated an employee after that employee announced an intention to transition to female. The transwoman employee intended to abide by the the funeral home's dress code for women, which was that women wear skirt suits. Men were required to wear pantsuits (and if that sounds weird to you, too it's because this gender norm is so entrenched, we only call women's clothing pantsuits). The funeral home also provided men with a clothing allowance, but did not provide the same for women. The court held that enforcing Title VII was not the least restrictive means to reach the argued-for compelling governmental interest of prohibiting sex discrimination in the form of sex stereotyping.

The opinion is long and an interesting mashup of sex stereotyping, dress codes, LGBTQIA discrimination, RFRA, and Hobby Lobby. I haven't thoroughly analyzed it yet, but it seems a very troubling decision for a wide variety of reasons, not least of which is that it seems to import a sort of ministerial exemption on steroids into the private sector. The sense I get from my first read of the opinion is that the court reasoned to get to this point primarily because it disagreed with one of the claims made by the EEOC, which was that gender identity is sex for purposes of Title VII. That proposition has been accepted by a number of courts, but had been rejected by this judge. 

This case is one to watch because it's certain to be appealed to the 6th Circuit.

MM

August 18, 2016 in Employment Discrimination, Labor and Employment News, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

New domestic worker protections in Illinois

ImagesIllinois became the sixth state to adopt a Domestic Workers Bill of Rights when Governor Rauner signed the bill last Friday. Domestic workers there will be covered by the state minimum wage laws, guaranteed rest periods, meals, and one day off a week, protected from discrimination including harassment, and protected from being paid "an oppressive and unreasonable wage." These protections are especially important because domestic workers are excluded from federal protections under the FLSA, the NLRA, OSHA, and other laws. Moreover working conditions for childcare workers contribute to poverty and may impair the care those workers can give. According to the National Domestic Workers Alliance, Illinois joins New York, Hawaii, California, Massachusetts, and Oregon. Connecticut also has extended some protections to domestic workers, although not passed the full-blown model bill of rights.  The Illinois law will take effect Jan. 1, 2017.

MM

August 16, 2016 in Employment Discrimination, Labor and Employment News, Wage & Hour | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Supreme Court grants Cert in NLRB Case and Issues Decision in FLSA Case

Supreme CourtA twofer from the Supreme Court already this week.  First, on Monday, the Court granted cert. in NLRB v. SW General.  The case addresses the question whether an individual can continue serving as an acting official once he or she has been officially nominated.  In this case, the individual is Lafe Solomon, whom President Obama designated as Acting General Counsel in 2010, under the Federal Vacancies Reform Act.  In 2011, the White House nominated Solomon to the Senate.  The D.C. Circuit held that once Solomon was nominated, the FVRA barred him from continue to serve as Acting General Counsel; the issue boils down to which provision of the act Solomon was designated when he became Acting GC.

Second, today the Court issued its decision in Encino Motorcars v. Navarro, which addressed a 2011 Department of Labor rule that said that car dealership employees who handle service appointments were not excluded from overtime--overturning many years of prior precedent that had included such employees under the "primarily engaged in . . . servicing automobiles" exception of the FLSA.  In its decision, the Court held that the DOL didn't deserve any deference because it failed to provide an explanation for its change of position.  However, the Court did not settle the issue and instead remanded to the Ninth Circuit to determine whether the employees were excluded under the FLSA.  Scotusblog has a good summary of the splintered decision, including the various opinions--especially with regard to whether the Court should have addressed the underlying issue of the exclusion's application, and how. 

-JH

June 21, 2016 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law, Wage & Hour | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

New Overtime Regulations Are Official

DOLThe White House announced today that tomorrow (Wednesday), the Department of Law will finalize its new overtime regulations.  Under these regs, the salary basis test for overtime exclusions will rise from  $23,660 to $47,476 per year ($455/week to $921/week).  Importantly, this amount will be updated automatically every three years to match the 40th percentile of full-time salaried workers in the lowest income Census region.  Similarly, the "highly-compensated employee" threshold will rise from $100,000/year to $134,404/year, and will also be updated automatically, based on the 90th percentile.  You can see the final rule here and a fact sheet on the final rule here.

-Jeff Hirsch

May 17, 2016 in Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Silicon Valley Arbitration Clauses

The NY Times today described the increasing use of arbitration clauses for Silicon Valley and other similar start-up firms.  This issue is nothing new to readers of this post, but it perhaps shows that even Silicon Valley isn't immune from broader workplace trends (although they certainly put a nicer spin on it).  As always, the devil is likely in the details.  Workers represented by experienced unions tend to fare well under arbitration systems, while individual employees--or those trying to form class actions--are far less likely to see the benefits of one-sided arbitration agreements.  As the article notes, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is seeking new rules for commercial arbitration, but aside from the NLRB, there seems little that agencies are doing for employees.

-Jeff Hirsch

May 14, 2016 in Arbitration, Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Uber Guild

UberYesterday, Uber announced that it had come to an agreement with the Independent Drivers Guild, which is not a formal union, but is affiliated with the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.  This agreement is not a concession by Uber that its drivers are employees; to the contrary, it is a way to give drivers a voice explicitly without making such a concession.  Broadly, the deal has Uber promising to hold monthly meeting with the Guild and sets up an appeals process for barred drivers.  Drivers will also get certain benefits, such as discounted insurance, roadside help, and legal assistance.  There will not be bargaining over fares and other benefits.  Moreover, the machinists promised not to try to organize during the 5-year agreement or seek status as employees under the NLRA.

This is a good example of non-traditional means to provide employees with voice in a non-union workplace. I've actually been working on a paper (for far too long) that explores these and other types of non-traditional collective voice measures, particularly ones that take a more collaborative stance towards employers. 

-Jeff Hirsch 

 

May 11, 2016 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (2)