Monday, March 16, 2015

Challenge to Brown University on the Horizon

NLRBAs we noted earlier, the UAW's attempt to organize graduate students at Columbia raised the potential for the NLRB reversing Brown University.  As of Friday, that potential significantly increased.  In two short decisions (I haven't been able to find them yet), the NLRB ordered a regional hearing on the UAW's petition to represent grad students at both Columbia and the New School.  This procedural decision establishes a path for the NLRB to ultimately review whether the students are employees under the NLRA.  Thus, these cases--in addition to the Northwestern University footballs players--means that we'll likely see a lot of collegiate student action at the Board for a while.

-JH

March 16, 2015 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Labor & Employment Roundup

OscarI'm well overdue for a labor & employment roundup, so this one is loaded.  And somewhat dated at times.  Enjoy:

 

Hat Tip: Jonathan Harkavy, Lynn Dancy Hirsch, Patrick Kavanagh

-JH

March 1, 2015 in Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Herbert & McNally on Just Cause and Social Networking

HerbertBill Herbert (Hunter College) and Alicia McNally (New York State PERB) have just posted on SSRN their article, Just Cause Discipline for Social Networking in the New Gilded Age: Will the Law Look the Other Way?.  The abstract:

We live and work in an era with the moniker of the New Gilded Age to describe the growth in societal income inequality. The designation is not limited to evidence of the growing gap in wealth distribution, but also the sharp rise in employment without security, including contingent and part-time work. This article examines the state of workplace procedural protections against discipline as they relate to employee use of social media in the New Gilded Age. In our times, reactions to the rapid distribution of troublesome electronic communications through social networking tend to eclipse patience for enforceable workplace procedures. The advent of social media and the decline of job security have created a perfect storm that raises the question of whether labor law will look the other way when it comes to the principles of workplace fairness and justice.

The article begins with President William McKinley’s introduction of the doctrine of just cause discipline into American labor law in 1897, during the Gilded Age, at the same time that the common law at-will doctrine was continuing to gestate. McKinley’s unilateral executive action established principles that remain the cornerstone of just cause discipline: proper notice, a fair evidentiary investigation, an opportunity to be heard, and nondiscriminatory treatment. The article then turns to the development of just cause standards in the 20th Century, which added other elements such as notice of workplace policies and the use of progressive discipline. Lastly, the article examines how just cause principles should be applied to allegations of electronic misconduct in the New Gilded Age to ensure reasonable and prudent disciplinary results, employee acceptance of adverse employment decisions, and a decreased likelihood of litigated claims of unlawful discrimination.

I'll confess that I was totally unaware of McKinley's action.  Learn about that move and the intersection of just cause and technology in this interesting article.

-JH

March 1, 2015 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy

HunterThe National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education's newest edition of the   Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy is out.  The peer-reviewed journal's latest includes the following articles:

  • The Impact of Unionization on University Performance by Mark Cassell and Odeh Halaseh;
  • Post-Recession CBAs: A Study of Wage Increases in the Agreements of Four State-wide Faculty Unions by Steve Hicks; and
  • Academic Collective Bargaining: Patterns and Trends by Curtis R. Sproul, Neil Bucklew, and Jeffery D. Houghton.

Check it out!

-JH

March 1, 2015 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, February 7, 2015

Senate Hearing on NLRB Joint Employer Rule

NLRBAs readers know, the NLRB's General Counsel is pursuing an action against McDonald's that, along with its opinion in the Roundy's case, would somewhat expand the concept of joint employment under the NLRA.  (Note that this article, which is otherwise good, mistakenly states that the NLRB has decided the issue.)  It's actually unclear to me how significant the GC's analysis would be in practice, but it's clearly a change in a direction that employers don't like.  As a result, the Senate recently held a hearing on the issue (there's a similar on the new representation rules that I'll post on once they happen later in the month).

Our emeritus blogger, Paul Secunda was one of the witnesses and seemed to do quite well).  There are obviously arguments about where the line between single and joint employment should be, but I think the GC is reasonably concerned about having their cake and eating it too (or Big Macs).  In other words, if corporations want more control over the employment practices of its franchises, it needs to take responsibility as well.  

-JH

February 7, 2015 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, February 2, 2015

Early Labor and Employment Supreme Court Decisions

Supreme CourtLast week, the Supreme Court decided two labor and employment cases.  In one, M&G Polymers, a unanimous Supreme Court held that courts should apply ordinary contract principles when deciding whether health-care benefits survive the expiration of a collective-bargaining agreement.  This holding reversed the Sixth Circuit's Yard-Man presumption that CBAs intend these benefits to vest for life.  The Court remanded for the CBA to be interpreted by "ordinary contract principles," but ominously noted that "when a contract is silent as to the duration of retiree benefits, a court may not infer that the parties intended those benefits to vest for life."  This stance seemed to be a primary motivation for a four-Justice concurrence (the more liberal Justices).  The concurrence stressed that courts should be open to interpreting a CBA to intend vesting of retirees' health benefits, albeit without the Yard-Man "thumb on the scale."  The impact of M&G Polymers will depend on how courts apply the decision, so we'll have to wait and see.

In the other decision, Department of Homeland Security v. MacLean, the Court held (7-2, with Justices Sotomayor and Kennedy dissenting) that a TSA regulation did not eliminate whistleblower protection.  At issue was a provision in the federal whistleblower statute that makes an exception for disclosures "specifically prohibited by law."  In MacLean, the Court held that Congress intended this provision to apply to statutes, but not agency regulations (e.g., elsewhere in the statute, Congress used the phrase "law, rule, or regulation").  The dissenters largely agreed with the majority, but thought the exception was satisfied by the Homeland Security Act's mandate that the TSA prescribe regulations to prevent disclosure of certain information.  This case is certainly a win for federal whistleblowers and will require Congress to be more proactive if it wants exceptions for certain whistleblower disclosures.

-JH

 

February 2, 2015 in Labor and Employment News, Pension and Benefits, Public Employment Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, January 16, 2015

White House Paid Family Leave Initiative

White houseToday, the White House announced a set of new initiatives to expand paid family leave. Among the plans:

  • Healthy Families Act: proposed legislation that would require employers to allow employees to earn up to 7 days of paid sick leave per year.
  • A start-up fund to help states create their own paid leave plans for their employees.
  • Improved data collection through the Department of Labor.
  • Proposed legislation to create paid parental leave for federal employees.
  • Expanding coverage of FMLA.
  • Expanding tax credits and federal funding for child care costs.
  • Increased funding for family care for elderly and disabled family members.
  • Improving enforcement of equal pay laws

This is an aggressive set of proposals, some of which are obvious nonstarters in the current Congress.  It's nice to see the President bringing attention to the issue though; however, I'd like more emphasis in the press on the limits of the FMLA that currently exists.  For instance, few people seem to realize that it only applies to employers with 50 or more employees.

-JH

January 16, 2015 in Labor and Employment News, Worklife Issues | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Oral Argument transcript in Mach Mining

ScotusThe Supreme Court heard oral argument today in Mach Mining v. EEOC, which you might remember from some of our prior posts (also here) and a guest post by Commissioner Feldblum. The transcript has been posted on the Supreme Court's website, and you can read it here. The case was about the EEOC's concilation process and whether that process is judicially reviewable.

I've read through and have some initial impressions. Even though the EEOC is the respondent here, I'm going to start with its arguments because there was significantly more back and forth with the Justices and the EEOC than with the Justices and counsel for the employer, Tom Goldstein. The EEOC has taken an understandable but difficult position, that it cannot file suit unless it has tried and been unable to conciliate on terms it desires. The EEOC asserted that it had a duty to attempt to conciliate, but that essentially, as long as it sent a letter to the employer notifying it that the EEOC had found cause to believe discrimination had occurred in connection with the charge and asking the employer to get in touch, that duty was satisfied. Counsel for the EEOC conceded that this did not seem to be much for judicial review, but argued that even in courts that used a minimal good faith standard, those courts were getting bogged down in mini-trials attempting to assess the quality of the conciliation efforts, something the statute provides no sort of standards for, since the statutory language gives the EEOC has the sole discretion to decide whether any potential terms of resolution are acceptable to it. Counsel for the EEOC was pressed repeatedly to articulate what should be required to ensure that the EEOC actually attempted to conciliate. Chief Justice Roberts, especially was wary of trusting the word of the agency that it had acted in good faith, and Justice Breyer was as well, although to a lesser degree.

With counsel for the employer, the Justices focused primarily on how to frame the issue as a matter of administrative law, since the statute contains no standards for review, nor does it define this conduct as a final agency action. Additionally, the statute requires that the EEOC keep conciliation matters secret and prohibits information about the conciliation process to be used as evidence at trial. 

In terms of Supreme Court bingo, predicting how the Justices will vote, I feel fairly confident that Chief Justice Roberts would vote to overturn the Seventh Circuit. I also feel fairly confident that Justices Ginsburg, Sotomayor, and Kagan are more sympathetic to the EEOC's position but might be willing to create some kind of standard more than what the Seventh Circuit required. Justice Kennedy questioned the employer's counsel pretty heavily, and Justice Breyer and Justice Scalia did the same for both sides.

One last observation. Developing a specialty in Supreme Court litigation will make you one smooth advocate. As a former appellate advocate, I have to say that Tom Goldstein (of Goldstein & Russell also founder of SCOTUSblog)'s argument was incredible to read. 

MM

January 13, 2015 in Beltway Developments, Employment Discrimination, Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, January 12, 2015

"Bye bye" Flight Attendants?

PlaneFrom Bloomberg, with a hat tip to Paul Harpur:

Thirteen former United Airlines (UAL) flight attendants say they were improperly fired last year after refusing to work on a Boeing Co. (BA) 747 jumbo jet that had “menacing” images drawn below its tail.

The attendants say they had a right to disobey orders to make the July 14 San Francisco-to-Hong Kong trip after the words “bye bye” were found written in an oil slick on the fuselage, according to a complaint to the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Two faces, one smiling and one “devilish,” were drawn nearby, according to the complaint.

At issue is the extent to which the images represented a security risk, as alleged by the attendants. According to the complaint, the workers saw a “serious” threat, while United inspected an auxiliary power unit near the drawings, found nothing suspicious and trivialized the incident as a “joke.”

rb

January 12, 2015 in Labor and Employment News, Workplace Safety | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, December 19, 2014

Big Day at NLRB: General Counsel Issues Joint-Employer Complaint Against McDonald's and NLRB Issues Decision Changing Religious and Faculty Exemption Doctrines

NLRBA couple of big NLRB actions today.  In the first, and as expected,  the General Counsel issued  consolidated complaints against McDonald's, alleging that the company is a joint employer along with its franchisees and therefore liable for numerous unfair labor practices (some of which have already been found to be meritorious).  This is likely part of the GC's push in Browning-Ferris to revise the joint-employer doctrine, as well as a more aggressive argument that corporate control over franchises warrants joint-employer status.  As far as the practical effect for the Board's recent moves, this case and Browning-Ferris is unparalleled.  As much as the religious and faculty issues today are interesting and email captures the public's attention (and mine), far more companies and employees could be impacted by changes to the joint-employer doctrine.  So this is one well worth watching.

In the second issue today, the Pacific Lutheran decision, the NLRB is getting a lot of bang for its buck, as it is changing two doctrines.  The first is a new Catholic Bishop analysis for determining when religious schools and faculty should be exempt from NLRB jurisdiction. Under the new Pacific Lutheran standard, the NLRB will only decline jurisdiction when a university or college shows that it "holds itself out as providing a religious educational environment" (a requirement adopted from the D.C. Circuit's Great Falls decision) and shows that "it holds out the petitioned-for faculty members as performing a religious function."  This latter requirement means that faculty must perform a "specific role" in the creation or maintenance of the school's religious education, as shown by evidence that might include job descriptions, employment agreements, faculty handbooks, and statements by the university.  This new standard is likely to decrease the number of schools that can enjoy the religion exemption, although it's not clear to me at this point how big that effect will be.

The second is a revision of the Yeshiva University standard for determining when university faculty are managerial employees exempt from NLRA coverage.  The NLRB describes this revision as an attempt to provide more guidance and predictability for parties concerned about the application of Yeshiva.  The analysis is focused on Yeshiva's requirement that managerial faculty have broad and substantial decision-making authority, which the Board attempts to capture with five categories of university decision-making.  Three of the categories are deemed more important to the university as a whole ("primary"): academic programs, finances, and enrollment management.  The other two categories are less important to the university as a whole ("secondary"): academic policy and personnel policy and decisions.  When determining whether faculty have control over these decisions, the Board will look to the actual exercise of control or ability to effectively recommend decisions.  The result seems like to expand the number of faculty who will be covered by the NLRA, but the extent to which that's true will have to wait for its application in more cases.

A busy and important day for the NLRB.  But, I don't expect it to be the last such day this year.

Hat Tip: Patrick Kavanagh

-JH

December 19, 2014 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, December 12, 2014

New NLRB Representation Rules

NLRBDoesn't the NLRB know this is a busy week for me?  First was yesterday's e-mail decision in Purple Communications.  Today, the NLRB released new final rules to reform the representation process.  As readers are well aware, this is Version 2.0 for the representation rulemaking process, which was initially caught up in challenges over NLRB member appointments.  The NLRB decided to drop the rules rather than fight the challenge.  Some commentators (ahem) thought that the critics should beware of what they ask for because the NLRB could come back with stronger rules. The Board proposed just such a set of rules in February. The Board has now adopted them in a final rule.  I haven't had time to compare the proposed and final rules side-by-side, but they look substantially the same at first glance.

Although these rules are somewhat broader than the ones in 2011, I should note that they aren't a surprise, as they track the NLRB initial proposed rules in 2011, which the Board eased back on a bit in their final rules.  The Board's information site on this year's rules has a very helpful chart comparing the old and new rules that you should definitely check out (but doesn't copy well on the blog).  Instead, I am copying the Board's summaries of the changes below; the full set of final rules is here.

One final note.  In spite of what critics will argue, these rules do not set up "ambush elections."  Instead, the NLRB is proposing modest reforms to eliminate unwarranted delay in the election process, both before an election is run and appeals to a completed election.  They are also doing basic modernization reforms, such as allowing electronic filing and including e-mail addresses in the Exclesior list, among other things.  There will still be plenty of time for unions and employers to express their views on unionization and for employees to make an informed decision.  There will just be somewhat less time for employers fight the union with captive-audience meetings and other aggressive tactics, some of which are illegal but difficult to remedy.  Employers will still have time for those strategies, just not as much.  The rules will also lessen the amount of time that employers can stall after a union wins an election--time that is often vital to a union trying to maintain support.  Finally, many critics will be people who argued against card-check elections by waving the banner of fair secret-ballot elections.  This is exactly what the Board is doing here by making the secret-ballot process fairer and lessening unnecessary delay.

Hat Tip: Patrick Kavanagh

-JH

Here's the summary:

Modernizing Board Procedures

Electronic Filing/Communications – Parties may file documents, such as petitions, electronically, rather than by fax or mail.  Parties and the NLRB’s regional offices can transmit documents electronically, rather than using slower or more expensive forms of communications, such as mail or express delivery services.    

Election Voter List – The employer must include available personal email addresses and phone numbers of voters on the voter list in order to permit non-employer parties to communicate with prospective voters about the upcoming election using modern forms of communication.

Streamlining Board Procedure and Reducing Unnecessary Litigation

Identifying Disputed Issues – The non-petitioning parties will be required to respond to the petition and state their positions generally the day before the pre-election  hearing opens.  The petitioner will be required to respond to the issues raised by the non-petitioning parties at the opening of the hearing.  Litigation inconsistent with the positions taken by the parties will generally not be allowed.   

Litigation of Eligibility and Inclusion Issues – Generally, only issues necessary to determine whether an election should be conducted will be litigated in a pre-election hearing.  A regional director may defer litigation of eligibility and inclusion issues affecting a small percentage of the appropriate voting unit to the post-election stage if those issues do not have to be resolved in order to determine if an election should be held.  In many cases, those issues will not need to be litigated because they have no impact on the results of the election.

Post Hearing Oral Argument and Briefs – All parties will be provided with an opportunity for oral argument before the close of the hearing.  Written briefs will be allowed only if the regional director determines they are necessary.      

Review of Regional Director Rulings – The parties may seek review of all regional representation-case rulings through a single post-election request, if the election results have not made those rulings moot.  The election will no longer be stayed after the regional director issues a decision and direction of election, in the absence of an order from the Board.

Review Standard for Post-election Issues – The Board will have the discretion to deny review of regional director post-election rulings, under the same standard that has governed Board review of regional director pre-election rulings for many years. 

Increasing Transparency and Standardizing Board Process 

Earlier and more complete information to the parties – When the petitioner files its petition, it will be required to simultaneously serve a copy of the petition, along with a more detailed Agency description of representation case procedures and an Agency Statement of Position form, on all parties identified in its petition in order to provide them with the earliest possible notice of the filing of the petition and Board procedures for processing those petitions.  NLRB regional offices will serve a Notice of Hearing and a Notice of Petition for Election (along with a copy of the petition, description of representation case procedures and the Statement of Position form) on all parties.   The non-petitioning parties will be required to respond to the petition (generally the day before the hearing opens) by filing with the regional director and serving on the other parties a Statement of Position identifying the issues they have with the petition.  As part of its Statement of Position, the employer will be required to provide all other parties with a list of prospective voters, their job classifications, shifts and work locations.        

Earlier and more complete information to employees - The employer is required to post a Notice of Petition for Election containing more detailed information on the filing of the petition and employee rights within two business days of the region’s service of the petition.  The Notice of Election will provide prospective voters with more detailed information about the election and the voting process.

Scheduling of Hearings – Except in cases presenting unusually complex issues, pre-election hearings will generally be set to open 8 days after a hearing notice is served on the parties.  Post-election hearings will generally open 14 days after objections are filed.        

 

December 12, 2014 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Secunda on Right to Work laws

SecundaWith right to work on the agenda and in the public eye in Wisconsin, it only makes sense that Milwaukee's NPR affiliate WUWM would turn to Paul Secunda, our friend and blogger emeritus. Paul was a guest on "Lake Effect," with this introduction:  "As a potential debate over right-to-work laws looms in Wisconsin, we get some historical perspective on such legislation, and more insight into the impact it could have on labor and politics in the Badger State." Follow the link to listen to the whole thing, or find just Paul's segment on this page. Nice work, Paul!

MM

December 11, 2014 in Commentary, Faculty News, Faculty Presentations, Labor and Employment News, Labor Law, Labor/Employment History | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

NLRB Reverses E-Mail Rule in Purple Communications

NLRBToday, the NLRB issued its 3-2 decision in Purple Communications, reversing Register-Guard.  In Register-Guard, the Board concluded that employees had no right to e-mail communications that used employers' equipment or networks (including employer email addresses).  This gave employers f almost total autonomy to ban workplace e-mails that involved NLRA-protected communications.

In Purple, the NLRB concludes that employees do have a Section 7 right to engage in e-mail communications at work, just like they have for written or oral communications at work under the Supreme Court's Republic Aviation case.  As the Board noted, this result logically flows from Republic Aviation's holding that employer's real property interests cannot trump employees' NLRA right to engage in protected communications in the workplace--instead those interests must be balanced.  The NLRB in Register-Guard distinguished Republic Aviation by relying on the fact that e-mail uses employers' personal, rather than real, property.  However, as the Board acknowledged in Purple, that's backwards because personal property is entitled to less protection than real property.  The Board also downplayed early cases making similar points for bulletin boards, telephones, and other personal property--none of which provided any substantive analysis of the issues involved.

The main rule in Purple is a Republic Aviation-based analysis, in which:

 we will presume that employees who have rightful access to their employer’s email system in the course of their work have a right to use the email system to engage in Section 7-protected communications on nonworking time. An employer may rebut the presumption by demonstrating that special circumstances necessary to maintain production or discipline justify restricting its employees’ rights.

Some important points for this analysis.  First, the Board did away with some aspects of Republic Aviation that doesn't fit e-mail well.  In particular, the right to use e-mail is not based on whether it was made in a non-work area or whether it is a solicitation or distribution.  This makes perfect sense, as neither distinction applies to electronic communications.  In contrast, the rule is limited to non-work time.  As the Board noted, this is going to require case-specific analyses.  That shouldn't be too hard in most cases (e.g., if employees don't have work and non-work time delineated, the employer shouldn't be allowed to limit e-mail based on that distinction), but there will be some gray areas.  Second, the presumption is limited to instances where employees already have access to employer e-mail.  Third, the decision is limited to e-mail, but not other electronic communications.  I find this odd, as the rationale of the decision should apply to texts and other similar electronic communications.  But the Board was probably just trying to limit the holding's reach.  Finally, the Board shed some light on how it will treat surveillance issues.  This was a potentially big issue, but the Board took a fairly employer-friendly view by stating that as long as the employer monitors e-mail as it ordinarily would (e.g, it doesn't increase monitoring when a union is on the scene), it will be OK.  

As many readers are aware, I've written a lot on this issue (including an amicus brief in Purple) and am quite pleased with the decision (if readers want more detail on these issues, you can see some of my earlier work here, here, and here).   It could've gone further, but I think the Board issued a very sound decision that wisely tried not to go broader than it needed to.  Although critics will say otherwise, the bottom line is that Purple is not a radical decision.  Register-Guard was the aberration by flauting both Supreme Court and basic common law. In Purple, the Board merely reversed an error and extended well-established precedent to a mode of communication that isn't even that new anymore.

-JH

December 11, 2014 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

McFerran Confirmed for NLRB Appointment

NLRBIt's official.  On Monday, the Senate voted to confirm Lauren McFerran to the NLRB by a 54-40 vote.  It's great to have the NLRB remaining at full strength and, while I'm disappointed not to see Sharon Block back, McFerran looks like she'll be really good.

Hat Tip: Patrick Kavanagh

-JH

December 9, 2014 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, December 4, 2014

Higher Education Conference and Archives

HunterBill Herbert writes to inform us about a couple of announcements from the The National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions.  The first is the Center's 42nd Annual Conference, at the CUNY Graduate Center in NYC, from April 19-21, 2015.  The topic is "Thinking about Tomorrow: Collective bargaining and Labor Relations in Higher Education.  As you can see from the conference website, there is an impressive list of panels and speakers.

Also, the Center has made available online all of its bimonthly newsletters from 1973-2000.  The website containing the archive notes:

Between 1973 and 2000, the National Center published a bimonthly newsletter with contributions from directors and newsletter editors Maurice Benewitz, Thomas Mannix, Theodore H. Lang, Aaron Levenstein, Joel M. Douglas, Frank R. Annunziato and Beth H. Johnson. In addition, issues of the newsletter included contributions by other scholars including Clark Kerr, Fred Lane, Clara Lovett, Stephen Joel Trachtenberg, Myron Lieberman, Irwin Polishook, Matthew Finkin, Richard W. Hurd and Richard Chait.

Over its 27 year publication history, the newsletter contained articles, analysis and data on subjects that continue to be topical in higher education and the professions including: the impact of the Supreme Court’s Yeshiva University decision, the organizing and representation of adjunct faculty and graduate students, academic freedom and tenure, shared governance, discrimination and faculty strikes. The final issue of the newsletter appeared in 2000 with excerpts of a speech given by then AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney at the National Center’s 28th annual conference as the first annual Albert Shanker Lecture.

-JH

December 4, 2014 in Conferences & Colloquia, Labor and Employment News, Labor Law, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Steven Greenhouse Leaving New York Times

GreenhouseSteven Greenhouse has announced that he, along with many other reporters, is taking a buyout offer from the New York Times.  This is bad news for the labor community, but certainly a well-deserved move, so I congratulate him.  Greenhouse has long been the go-to guy on labor reporting, not only because he's been basically the lone major media labor reporter, but also because of the high-quality of his reporting.  That said, it's seemed to me that there's been a growing crop of young reporters working on the labor beat.  Although they've been largely at smaller news organizations or blog-type pages at bigger outlets, there's been some really good work from these reporters over the last few years.  Greenhouse can probably take credit for blazing a path for these reporters and if his legacy is a bigger pool of labor reporters--after labor reporting had seemed dead--then that's a major accomplishment by itself.

Here's the email that Greenhouse sent colleagues, quoted from Capital New York:

This has been one of the toughest decisions of my life," he wrote. "I love the Times, I love my job, and I love my colleagues here." He explained his rationale for taking the Times' offer. "The Times made a generous buyout offer that was hard to refuse. That and the fact that two good friends—both also 63, both terrific journalists—died over the past few months really pushed me to take this step and begin my next chapter. Also, I realize that I need to slow down, at least somewhat. I work too damn hard—that’s my fault, not the NYT’s." As for his next steps, Greenhouse said that he's working on a book—to be published by Knopf—about workers, and will also be freelancing for the Times.

Best of luck!

-JH

December 4, 2014 in Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

McFerran Approved by HELP Committee

NLRBThe Senate's HELP committee has approved Lauren McFerran's nomination to the NLRB by a party-line vote (12-10).  The early timing of the committe's action is probably the most important fact, as it seems to indicate an intent to have a full Senate vote before the end of the year--and the changing of the Senate majority to Republicans.  It's looking, therefore, that the Board will have it's full five members until at least August 2015, when Harry Johnson's term expires (there could be a minor delay between Nancy Shiefer's term, which ends on Dec. 16 and McFerran's confirmation).  Given that Johnson is Republican, we could see his seat filled in a timely fashion, although I wouldn't bet either way on that one.

Hat Tip: Patrick Kavanagh

-JH

December 4, 2014 in Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, December 1, 2014

AALS workplace sections joint newsletter

Aals Thanks to Monique Lillard (Idaho), chair of the AALS Labor Relations and Employment section and Natasha Martin (Seattle), chair of the AALS Employment Discrimination section for sending along the joint newsletter of the two sections for posting. Download it while it's hot:  Download Joint Newsletter for AALS Sections

MM

December 1, 2014 in Disability, Employment Common Law, Employment Discrimination, Faculty News, International & Comparative L.E.L., Labor and Employment News, Labor Law, Public Employment Law, Scholarship, Teaching, Wage & Hour | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Uber Collective Action

UberNew technology meets old-school labor unrest.  Recently, the online ride service, Uber, has faced a series of collective actions by its drivers, which have objected to the increasingly tight terms and conditions of their relationship with the company.  One of the many interesting aspects of this dispute is that the drivers, like many taxi drivers, are classified by Uber as independent contractors.  That doesn't stop the drivers' ability to engage in work stoppages, but it of course eliminates any legal protection against retaliation.  However, there's currently a suit pending in San Francisco challenged the classification, so things could get more interesting.

Hat Tip: Michael Duff

-JH

November 27, 2014 in Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, November 15, 2014

2013-2014 Labor & Employment Supreme Court Review

Supreme CourtA little self-promotion.  My article, The Supreme Court's 2013-2014 Labor and Employment Law Decisions: Consensus at the Court, which is appearing in the Employment Law and Employment Policy Journal, is now on SSRN.  In the article, I examine all the labor and employment cases this term, plus some related cases and recent grants of cert.  I'll also note that I spend a lot of time on Harris v. Quinn, including what I view as the more significant aspects of the decision: the Court's take on joint employment and the First Amendment in the workplace.

Also check out Jonathan Harkavy's latest Supreme Court review, 2014 Supreme Court Employment Law Commentary.  He looks behind the veneer of consensus this term to argue that the Court's conservative majority still hasn't changed its stripes--a view with which, despite my title, I completely agree.

Finally, FWIW, my 2012-2013 Supreme Court review is here.

-JH

 

November 15, 2014 in Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)