Tuesday, August 14, 2018

FINAL CALL: COSELL REGISTRATION ENDS ON MONDAY!!!

COSELL will be held in South Carolina, Sept. 27-29

 

SouthCarolina

Just a quick reminder that registration for COSELL XIII closes on August 20: Registration is currently still available here!!! 

The Thirteenth Annual Colloquium On Scholarship in Employment and Labor Law (COSELL) will be held at the University of South Carolina School of Law in Columbia, South Carolina.  We are celebrating our move into a completely new legal facility, and we look forward to you joining us for the conference from the evening of Thursday, September 27th through the afternoon of Saturday, September 29th, 2018.  Information on registration, the conference hotel, and participating in the conference is available here.  Registration for the conference hotel is also now available online, and can be completed here.

We look forward to seeing everyone in South Carolina in a couple of months, and please let me know if you have any questions about the registration process

Joe Seiner

August 14, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Call for LEL Papers: Marquette Benefits and Social Welfare Law Review

Marquette

Here's a call for papers from the Marquette Benefits and Social Welfare Law Review:

The Marquette Benefits and Social Welfare Law Review is seeking submissions for its Spring 2019 Symposium on the topic of the revitalization of labor law. In the past year, teachers across the nation have gone on strike en masse for higher wages and better working conditions. The United States Supreme Court’s recent decision in Janus v. AFSCME is expected to have wide-ranging effects on public sector unions. These are but a few examples of current issues in labor law we hope to highlight.

Symposium articles will be published in Volume 20, Issue 1, scheduled for publication in Spring 2019. At this time, we invite all interested scholars and practitioners to submit a title and abstract to be considered for publication in the Symposium issue. Please send titles and abstracts no later than Friday, August 31, 2018.

Articles should be between twenty and twenty-five double-spaced pages. Final article submissions will be due December 31, 2018.

Titles and abstracts may be submitted via email to Travis L. Yang, Symposium Editor, at travis.yang@marquette.edu.

rb

July 28, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

ILERA Conference - Seoul

IleraI am attending this week the International Labour and Employment Relations Association conference in Seoul. Here's a brief description of the organization:

The International Industrial Relations Association (IIRA) was established in 1966 in response to a growing need to develop and exchange knowledge in the field of industrial relations, at the international level, and provide the academic and the practitioner with a forum for discussion and research. Its founding members were the British Universities Industrial Relations Association, the Industrial Relations Research Association (USA), the International Institute for Labour Studies (Geneva, Switzerland) and the Japan Institute of Labour. In 2010 it was decided to change its name to International Labour and Employment Relations Association, Ilera.

There are a respectable number of U.S. academics, mostly from business and ILR schools; relatively few are law faculty. There are about 1900 total attendees. There's a good mix of academics, H.R. practitioners, and labor union activists, though most of the panels are academically oriented. This is my first time to attend ILERA; I'm here because I (correctly) anticipated heavy representation from folks throughout East and Southeast Asia.

If you're interested in learning more, email me. If you're interested in attending the next ILERA conference (Lund, Sweden, 21-24 June 2021), a conference brochure is after the page break.

rb

Continue reading

July 24, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 19, 2018

AALS Call for Papers: Labor & Employment Law Protections and Religious Accomodations

The Executive Committee of the AALS Labor Relations and Employment Law Section is seeking abstracts as part of a Call for Papers to be presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting program in New Orleans. The program, titled Increasing Tension: Labor and Employment Law Protections and Religious Accommodations, will take place on Friday, January 4, 2019, from 10:30 am to 12:15 pm, and it is co-sponsored by the AALS Employment Discrimination Law and Law and Religion Sections. This program will follow the Labor Relations and Employment Law and Employment Discrimination Sections breakfast held from 7:00 a.m. to 8:30 that morning.

This program will focus on the increasing tension between workplace and antidiscrimination laws and religious freedom.  Panelists will explore the challenges presented by this tension when religious exemptions from workplace and antidiscrimination laws are provided to religious organizations, employers with deeply held religious beliefs, and individual employees.  A panel of leading labor and employment law and law and religion scholars will address that issue from varying perspectives, including constitutional law (religious freedom and/or compelled speech and association in the workplace), traditional labor law (NLRB’s jurisdiction over religiously affiliated employers and the impact on employee organizing drives), and employment discrimination law.

We are seeking an additional speaker or speakers who will present on a relevant topic, and we particularly encourage new voices to submit a paper abstract. To be considered as an additional speaker, please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words and a resume to Section Chair, Joseph Mastrosimone, at joseph.mastrosimone@washburn.edu by Friday, September 17, 2018. The Executive Committee of the Section will decide on the additional speaker(s). Any selected speaker(s) will be responsible for his/her registration fee as well as hotel and travel expenses related to speaking at the program on January 4, 2019. 

 

-Jeff Hirsch

July 19, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia, Employment Discrimination, Labor and Employment News, Religion, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

AALS New & Emerging Workplace Law Voices Call for Submissions

 

New and Emerging Voices in Workplace Law Session at 2019 AALS Annual Meetin

The AALS Section on Employment Discrimination Law and AALS Section on Labor Relations and Employment Law is inviting submissions for a joint program, New and Emerging Voices in Workplace Law, at the AALS 2019 Annual Meeting in New Orleans on Thursday, January 3, 2019, from 3:30-4:45 p.m.  

About.  This works-in-progress session will give emerging workplace law scholars the opportunity for engagement on a current project with leaders in the field.  Each selected scholar will present a work-in-progress and receive comments from an assigned commentator, as well as from an audience of scholars in the field.  The session will provide new scholars a supportive environment in which to receive constructive feedback.

Eligibility.  Full-time faculty members of AALS member and fee-paid law schools are eligible to submit proposals. This call for papers is targeted to scholars with seven or fewer years of full-time teaching experience.  Visitors (not full-time on a different faculty) and fellows are eligible to apply to present at this session.

Submission Format.   Please submit an abstract, précis, and/or introduction of the article that is sufficiently developed to allow the reviewers to evaluate the thesis and proposed execution of the project.

Submission Instructions.  To be considered, proposals should be submitted electronically to Professors Joseph Fishkin, at jfishkin@law.utexas.edu, and Joseph Mastrosimone, at joseph.mastrosimone@washburn.edu.  The deadline for submission is Friday, September 1, 2018.  

Selection.  Presenters will be selected after review by the Chairs of both sections.  Selected authors will be notified by September 29, 2018.  Presenters will be responsible for paying their annual meeting registration fee and travel expenses.  To facilitate valuable feedback at the session, presenters should provide a substantial draft by December 3, 2018.

Questions.  Any inquiries about the Call for Papers should be submitted to the Chair for the Section on Employment Discrimination Law, Professor Joseph Fishkin, at jfishkin@law.utexas.edu and/or the Chair for the Section on Labor Relations and Employment Law, Joseph Mastrosimone, atjoseph.mastrosimone@washburn.edu.

 

-Jeff Hirsch

July 19, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 12, 2018

COSELL XIII Registration Reminder - South Carolina, Sept. 27-29

SouthCarolina

Just a quick reminder that registration for COSELL XIII closes on August 20: Registration is currently still available here!!! 

The Thirteenth Annual Colloquium On Scholarship in Employment and Labor Law (COSELL) will be held at the University of South Carolina School of Law in Columbia, South Carolina.  We are celebrating our move into a completely new legal facility, and we look forward to you joining us for the conference from the evening of Thursday, September 27th through the afternoon of Saturday, September 29th, 2018.  Information on registration, the conference hotel, and participating in the conference is available here.  Registration for the conference hotel is also now available online, and can be completed here.

We look forward to seeing everyone in South Carolina in a couple of months, and please let me know if you have any questions about the registration process

Joe Seiner

July 12, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 25, 2018

Biagi Conference Call for Papers

BiagiMany thanks to Susan Bisom-Rapp for sending the Call for Papers for the 2019 Marco Biagi Conference (Modena, Italy; March 18-20, 2019). The coming year’s theme is The Collective Dimension(s) of Employment Relations.

rb

June 25, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

COSELL XIII Registration Reminder - South Carolina, Sept. 27-29

SouthCarolina

COSELL XIII Registration Now Open:  available here!!! 

Registration is now open for The Thirteenth Annual Colloquium On Scholarship in Employment and Labor Law (COSELL), which will be held at the University of South Carolina School of Law in Columbia, South Carolina.  We are celebrating our move into a completely new legal facility, and we look forward to you joining us for the conference from the evening of Thursday, September 27th through the afternoon of Saturday, September 29th, 2018.  Information on registration, the conference hotel, and participating in the conference is now available here.  Registration for the conference hotel is also now available online, and can be completed here.

We look forward to seeing everyone in South Carolina next fall, and please let me know if you have any questions about the registration process

Joe Seiner

June 5, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, June 2, 2018

CHANGE OF DATE:  Second Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum

CHANGE OF DATE: 

The Second Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum will be held at UC Davis Law School on Friday, November 16 – Saturday, November 17

Note:  This is a change from the earlier announced November 9-10 date. 

The date for submission of proposals (July 1) remains the same.

Corrected Call for Proposals:

Call for Proposals for the Second Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum

Building on the success of the Inaugural Equality Law Scholars’ Forum held at UC Berkeley Law last fall, and in the spirit of academic engagement and mentoring in the area of Equality Law, we (Tristin Green, University of San Francisco; Angela Onwuachi-Willig, UC Berkeley; and Leticia Saucedo, UC Davis) announce the Second Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum to be held this fall.  This Scholars’ Forum seeks to provide junior scholars with commentary and critique and to provide scholars at all career stages the opportunity to engage with new scholarly currents and ideas.  We hope to bring together scholars with varied perspectives (e.g., critical race theory, class critical theory, feminist legal theory, law and economics, law and society) across fields (e.g., criminal system, education, employment, family, health, immigration, property, tax) and with work relevant to many diverse identities (e.g., age, class, disability, national origin, race, sex, sexuality) to build bridges and to generate new ideas in the area of Equality Law.  

We will select five relatively junior scholars (untenured, newly tenured, or prospective professors) to present papers from proposals submitted in response to this Call for Proposals. In so doing, we will select papers that cover a broad range of topics within the area of Equality Law.  Leading senior scholars will provide commentary on each of the featured papers in an intimate and collegial setting.  The Equality Law Scholars’ Forum will pay transportation and accommodation expenses for participants and will host a dinner on Friday evening.  

This year’s Forum will be held on November 16-17, 2018 at UC Davis Law School.

Junior scholars are invited to submit abstracts of proposed papers, 3-5 pages in length, by July 1, 2018.

Full drafts must be available for circulation to participants by October 19, 2018.

Proposals should be submitted to:

Tristin Green, USF School of Law, tgreen4@usfca.edu.  Electronic submissions via email are preferred.

 

CAS

June 2, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Announcing the Eighth and Ninth Annual Employee Benefits & Social Insurance Conferences

Peter Wiedenbeck (Wash. U.) writes to let us know about the annual Employee Benefits & Social Insurance Conferences, which have been running since 2012. The save-the-date  announcement:

We are pleased to announce the dates and locations of the next two annual Employee Benefits & Social Insurance Conferences. The schedule is:

Academic Year 2018–2019

Friday, March 29, 2019

University of Illinois College of Law

Organized by Sean Anderson

[email: smander@illinois.edu; telephone: 217-244-8256]

Academic Year 2019–2020

Friday, October 18, 2019

Boston College Law School

Organized by Natalya Shnitser

[email: natalya.shnitser@bc.edu; telephone: 617-552-2883]

If you are interested in participating in either conference, contact the organizer to receive additional information.

-Jeff Hirsch

May 23, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia, Pension and Benefits | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Call for Proposals for the Second Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum

Call for Proposals for the Second Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum

Building on the success of the Inaugural Equality Law Scholars’ Forum held at UC Berkeley Law last fall, and in the spirit of academic engagement and mentoring in the area of Equality Law, we (Tristin Green, University of San Francisco; Angela Onwuachi-Willig, UC Berkeley; and Leticia Saucedo, UC Davis) announce the Second Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum to be held this fall.  This Scholars’ Forum seeks to provide junior scholars with commentary and critique and to provide scholars at all career stages the opportunity to engage with new scholarly currents and ideas.  We hope to bring together scholars with varied perspectives (e.g., critical race theory, class critical theory, feminist legal theory, law and economics, law and society) across fields (e.g., criminal system, education, employment, family, health, immigration, property, tax) and with work relevant to many diverse identities (e.g., age, class, disability, national origin, race, sex, sexuality) to build bridges and to generate new ideas in the area of Equality Law.  

We will select five relatively junior scholars (untenured, newly tenured, or prospective professors) to present papers from proposals submitted in response to this Call for Proposals. In so doing, we will select papers that cover a broad range of topics within the area of Equality Law.  Leading senior scholars will provide commentary on each of the featured papers in an intimate and collegial setting.  The Equality Law Scholars’ Forum will pay transportation and accommodation expenses for participants and will host a dinner on Friday evening.  

This year’s Forum will be held on November 9-10, 2018 at UC Davis Law School.

Junior scholars are invited to submit abstracts of proposed papers, 3-5 pages in length, by July 1, 2018.

 Full drafts must be available for circulation to participants by October 19, 2018.

Proposals should be submitted to:

Tristin Green, USF School of Law, tgreen4@usfca.edu.  Electronic submissions via email are preferred.

CAS

May 10, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Registration Now Open - COSELL XIII - South Carolina, Sept. 27-29

SouthCarolina

COSELL XIII Registration Now Open:  available here!!! 

Registration is now open for The Thirteenth Annual Colloquium On Scholarship in Employment and Labor Law (COSELL), which will be held at the University of South Carolina School of Law in Columbia, South Carolina.  We are celebrating our move into a completely new legal facility, and we look forward to you joining us for the conference from the evening of Thursday, September 27th through the afternoon of Saturday, September 29th, 2018.  Information on registration, the conference hotel, and participating in the conference is now available here.   

We look forward to seeing everyone in South Carolina next fall, and please let me know if you have any questions about the registration process

Joe Seiner

April 19, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Symposium on Animus, Bill Araiza's book, at Stetson

Friend-of-the-blog, Jason Bent (Stetson) shared news of a symposium at Stetson this Friday that sounds like it will be of interest to many of our readers:

On Friday, April 20, the Stetson Law Review is hosting a symposium exploring the Supreme Court’s emerging animus doctrine in constitutional law.  The discussion is inspired by Brooklyn Law Professor William D. Araiza’s new book, Animus: A Short Introduction to Bias in the Law.  The symposium will explore the role of animus in the Court’s recent equal protection jurisprudence, including United States v. Windsor and Obergefell v. Hodges, as well as its implications for religious freedoms and workplace law.  The symposium can be viewed for free via simultaneous webcast.  For the full agenda, the list of speakers, and more information about registering or viewing the webcast please visit:   

 http://www.stetson.edu/law/conferences/homepages/law-review-symposium.php

The lineup looks great and includes a number of workplace law friends, like Jessica Clarke (Minnesota) and Katie Eyer (Rutgers). Tune in to the live webcast if you can't make it in person.

MM 

April 17, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia, Employment Discrimination | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 16, 2018

Prospective Law Teachers Workshop at SEALS

Friend-of-Blog Brad Areheart (Tennessee) sends along the following workshop information for SEALS:

Each year, SEALS hosts a Prospective Law Teachers Workshop, which provides opportunities for aspiring law teachers to network and participate in mock interviews and mock job talks — prior to the actual teaching market. The Committee also schedules 1-on-1 sessions for candidates to receive faculty feedback on their CVs. This year’s Prospective Law Teacher’s Workshop will be held at The Fort Lauderdale Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on Monday, August 6, and Tuesday, August 7, 2018. There are also many excellent panels throughout the week that are targeted to newer law professors, which prospective law professors will also find helpful. See http://sealslawschools.org/submissions/program/programwp.asp. If you are interested in participating in this year’s workshop, please send your CV and a brief statement of interest to professor Brad Areheart (Tennessee) at brad.areheart@tennessee.edu, who co-chairs the committee along with professor Leah Grinvald (Suffolk). Please also indicate when you are planning to go on the teaching market. Applications are due by May 15, 2018. Many of the past workshop participants have gone on to obtain tenure-track appointments and now teach at a wide variety of law schools, including Tulane, South Carolina, UNC, Cal Western, Boston College, Georgia, Alabama, Oklahoma, Boston U., Tulsa, Wisconsin, Michigan State, Maryland, Idaho, Colorado, Miami, Richmond, Louisville, and others.

This is a great opportunity for new law teachers, and SEALS is always a great conference to attend.

- Joe Seiner

April 16, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Call-for-Papers: Reshaping Work in the Platform Economy

Diane Ring (Boston College) sends along a call-for-papers on reshaping work in the platform economy (Amsterdam, October 25-26, 2018).  The section related to law is attached below, and the full announcement is available at this Call for papers link.

"We welcome academics, business leaders, national and European law- and policymakers, representatives from the temporary staffing industry, platform companies, and platform workers to explore and discuss the evolving intersection between law and the platform economy on critical issues that are shaping the future of work. Accordingly, scholars and other professionals are invited to present papers across a range of legal research topics including, not limited to: • Labor law and policy: emerging trends, options and challenges • Dispute resolution: role of arbitration, courts, and regulation • Discrimination across the platform economy: platforms, workers and consumers • Liability and Risk: current practices, alternatives and implications for allocating liability and risk • Taxation: the impact of tax design choices on the direction of the platform economy and on the role of workers in platform business models • Consumer protection and/or Competition law: impact on establishing a level playing field".

This looks like a great conference and opportunity to engage in this complex and emerging area of the law.

- Joe Seiner

April 10, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, March 9, 2018

Gender Sidelining at California Western

Jessica Fink's organizing a symposium in April in "Gender Sidelining".  The webpage explains:

Subtle, yet pernicious forms of unequal treatment exist wherein women may not experience adverse outcomes that are actionable under anti-discrimination or other laws, but nonetheless may find themselves hindered in their ability to advance and flourish. These myriad behaviors, policies, and practices lead to "Gender Sidelining"—a term recently coined by a group of law professors at California Western—whereby women experience obstacles that the law does not (and arguably should not) proscribe.

The Gender Sidelining Symposium on April 26-27, 2018 will highlight examples of and help us understand the process by which this phenomenon occurs. By bringing together academics and practitioners from a broad range of fields—employment and labor law, business law, criminal law, politics, and beyond—the symposium will take an innovative look at how existing social structures can lead to adverse treatment on the basis of gender when actions may not be motivated by gender-based animus or even by implicit bias.

Questions can be directed to Jessica at jfink@cwsl.edu.

CAS

March 9, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 12, 2018

18th Annual Women and the Law Conference

Thanks to Susan Bisom-Rapp (TJSL) for sending the announcement below of the 18th Annual Women and the Law Conference and the 16th Ginsburg Lecture. Details are below.

Women

rb

January 12, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia, Employment Discrimination | Permalink | Comments (0)

The "Signaling" Effect of Raising Minimum Wage Laws

HelmanI posted yesterday on the conference earlier this week on minimum wage laws in developing countries. Daniel Helman (Ton Duc Thang University, Labor Relations & Trade Unions) circulated a follow-up email making a point about minimum wage laws I hadn't considered before. I suspect his argument has equal force when a single state or municipality in the U.S. raises its minimum wage significantly above (extraordinarily low, by any historical standard) national base rate. Here is Daniel's argument:

During my recent visits to Australia and Singapore (in December) I spent some time networking with academic colleagues. In both places people were talking about how Vietnam was projected to be the most important economy in SE Asia in twenty years. One of the key indicators of this projection is the rate of rise of wages here in Vietnam. The rapid wage increase is seen as a reflection of economic strength and an indicator of future economic growth.

Thus the trend in wage increases signals to the rest of the world that the economy of Vietnam is becoming increasingly robust. Such a signal leads to foreign investment at a consumer level—as international companies aim to establish an economic presence here in Vietnam. They do this now so that in the future, as the domestic demand is large, they will have a well-established presence and will be able to command a large share of the market in their sector.

***

Of course Vietnam has other features that influence its future success, such as a single-party system which allows for more focused and beneficial policies to be implemented more easily than in other systems; and a culture that is perhaps more focused on its own success after so much hardship for so many decades; and other intangibles, such as respect for the role of work and effort in the family. But the increase in wages—based in large part on the increases in the minimum wage over the past several years, has done a great deal to place Vietnam very high in its economic forecast. Such a signal leads to future investment, and these facts can form a strategy to (rightly) promote future increases in the minimum wage here so that it will reach the level of a living wage sufficient to meet more basic needs. It is similar to the point [ILO Vietnam Country Director] Dr. Chang-Hee Lee made on the first day [of the conference], about how increases in the minimum wage increase demand.

Obviously the totality of pathways and feedbacks are more complicated than what I have written above, but the essential point is that the rate of increase in wages is a signal of the growing robustness of the domestic market; and that this signal is read by global economic stakeholders and influences their behavior.

rb

January 12, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia, International & Comparative L.E.L., Wage & Hour | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Minimum Wage Laws in SE Asia

TdtuEarlier this week I participated in a conference on minimum wage laws in Viet Nam (and SE Asia generally) at the Tôn Đức Thắng University Labor College in Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), Viet Nam. International wage & hour law is not my specialty, so it was a pleasure to learn from the many law faculty, workers' advocates, employer representatives, and even even the former head of the VGCL (the government-controlled unified trade union) attending. My key take-aways:

  • The traditional neoclassical economic argument that increasing the minimum wage decreases employment may have even less salience in developing countries than in developed ones. Even in the countries like Viet Nam that produce a large quantity of the clothing, electronics, and other goods consumed in the West, the vast majority of workers still work in services and manufacturing for the local economy. Raising minimum wages can increase both worker productivity and domestic consumption, which can have a positive effect on economic growth and employment and thus offset potential negative effects.

  • The risk of capital flight in response to raising the minimum wage is overstated. A MNC that has built a factory here is unlikely to relocate it because of a requirement that it spend an extra few cents per hour on wages. It's less clear how increases in minimum wage laws might influence future capital allocation decisions.

  • Companies looking to maximize profits by minimizing labor costs are barking up the wrong tree -- they should instead be looking to cut supply-chain costs. The pair of Nikes we spend $150 for in the West costs about $12 to make, of which $2-3 is labor costs. The $138 difference between retail price and cost-of-production is where companies should be looking if they want to squeeze further profits. Nike could slash those costs by vertically integrating, which would have the salutary effect of making Nike directly and obviously responsible for the workers who make the company's shoes. The fact that the Nikes of the world aren't doing this is telling.
  • The proportion of workers in the informal economy has a huge impact on the efficacy of minimum wage laws. Minimum wage laws may actually exacerbate wage inequality in countries where a large proportion of workers are off-the-books.
  • Minimum wage laws can perform an important signaling effect in developing countries. I'll add a guest post on this topic shortly.

rb

January 11, 2018 in Conferences & Colloquia, International & Comparative L.E.L., Wage & Hour | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Labor and Higher Education Paper and Conference

HunterSome news from friend-of-the-blog, Bill Herbert (Hunter College):

This article begins with a brief history of unionization and collective bargaining in higher education. It then presents data concerning the recent growth in newly certified collective bargaining representatives at private and public-sector institutions of higher education, particularly among non-tenure track faculty. The data is analyzed in the context of legal decisions concerning employee status and unit composition under applicable federal and state laws. Lastly, the article presents data concerning strike activities on campuses between January 2013 and May 31, 2017.

  • On-registration has begun for the National Center's 45th annual higher education labor-management conference in New York City on April 15-17, 2018.  The theme of the conference is Facing New Realities in Higher Education and the Professions.

    The keynote speaker will be Dean David Weil of the Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, and author of the Fissured Workplace.

    The conference plenary will discuss Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his legacy for our times withWilliam P. Jones, University of Minnesota; Derryn Moten, Alabama State University, and Jeanne Theoharis, Brooklyn College, CUNY.

    The following are the subjects of some of the confirmed conference workshops and panels:

    -Workshops on April 15, 2018:  Unionization and collective bargaining for administrators and academic labor; bargaining over health care in higher education; preparing, presenting, and defending at arbitration; financial analysis in higher education; effective lobbying for higher education

    -Panels on April 16-17, 2018: Responding to Janus: collective bargaining and membership engagement; recently negotiated first contracts for adjunct faculty; bargaining a first contract for graduate student employees; interest-based bargaining at community colleges; wage discrimination at universities and professional schools; creative solutions for resolving wage compression; unionization at religiously-affiliated colleges and universities; unionized environments at academic libraries; and unionization of doctors and nurses.

 

-Jeff Hirsch

 

December 19, 2017 in Conferences & Colloquia, Labor and Employment News, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)