Wednesday, September 14, 2016

AALS L&E Sections Newsletter

Joey Fishkin & Joe Mastrosimone are co-chairing the labor and employment AALS sections this year and write to seek information for the joint annual newsletter. As someone who has had the pleasure of helping with this effort in the past, let me put in a plea on their behalf--please help out! The newsletter is only as good as the info provided for it, so at a minimum, fill them in on any relevant news for the year. Also, the case/legislation briefs are really helpful to readers, so please consider doing one of those as well. Joe & Joey write:

Dear Colleagues:

It is time once again for the preparation of a joint annual newsletter for the AALS Section on Employment Discrimination and the Section on Labor Relations and Employment Law, and we need your help as readers and section members. Please forward this message to any and all people you know who teach or write in the Employment Discrimination, Labor Law, and Employment Law fields.

First, if you have news of any faculty visits, lateral moves, entry-level hires, or promotions and please e-mail that news to Joseph Mastrosimone at Joseph.Mastrosimone@washburn.edu.

Second, please also e-mail Joseph Mastrosimone with any information about conference announcements and calls for papers, employment or fellowship opportunities, honors and awards, and reports on recent conferences or other events of interest to the two Sections’ members.

Third, we want to include a list of relevant employment or labor law-related publications published in 2016.  These publications can be books, articles, and chapters.  We are working on compiling a list, but it would help us make sure not to miss your publications if you would send them to us!  So, please send an email with your relevant 2016 publications to Ms. Penny Fell at Penny.Fell@washburn.edu; use the subject line “Publications for AALS Newsletter”.  (Note: please hold your forthcoming 2017 publications for next year’s newsletter.  We’re looking for 2016 publications.)

Fourth and finally, we want to solicit anyone who would be interested in writing a brief description of a recent important labor and employment case or any significant new labor or employment legislation. Your subject could be a recent Supreme Court decision (including Fisher v. University of Texas, Heffernan v. City of Paterson, Tyson Foods, Inc. v. Bouaphakeo, Green v. Brennan, etc.), a significant NLRB decision (including Columbia University, Miller & Anderson, Inc., Piedmont Gardens, etc.), a significant circuit court decision or emerging circuit split, a state supreme court decision, or an innovative and potentially influential new federal, state, or local law. The description should be fairly short — it need not be more than a couple of paragraphs, and should definitely be under 2 pages.  If you're looking for an easy way to get your name out there or want a quick outlet for your ruminations about a case or new law, this could be a good opportunity.  Please let us know what you are interested in writing about — if you would like to do this, please email Joey Fishkin at jfishkin@law.utexas.edu by October 15 to indicate your interest and say what you’d like to write about.

Thank you very much for your help!

Joe & Joey

September 14, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia, Faculty Moves, Faculty News, Faculty Presentations, Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call for Panelists on Symposium on the Future of Labor & Employment Law

The Washburn Law Journal and the Center for Law and Government are hosting a symposium on the “Future of Labor and Employment Law: Power, Policies, and Politics” to be held on February 23, 2017 at Washburn University.  From the call:

With Congress gridlocked, federal agencies are increasingly at the forefront of regulatory change in labor and employment law. Supporters of these administrative initiatives defend them as both necessary and commendable. Meanwhile, critics challenge the form, scope, and substance of these agency actions. This symposium bridges these competing viewpoints across a variety of cutting-edge labor and employment law issues.

The symposium will feature a keynote address and three panel discussions comprised of nationally recognized experts in the field. The three panels will cover:

- The EEOC's Expansion of Title VII to Include Sexual Orientation Discrimination

- Religious Freedom and Accommodation Issues Arising from Regulatory Expansions

- The Stubborn Problem of Unpaid, Unregulated, and Illegal Labor

More information about the event and the panels can be found at: http://washburnlaw.edu/futureoflaborlaw. The Law Journal is eagerly seeking panelists for this event.  Speakers have the opportunity to publish articles based on their presentation in the Summer 2017 issue of the Washburn Law Journal.  Articles from Journal’s 2013 labor and employment law focused symposium can be found at: http://washburnlaw.edu/publications/wlj/issues/52-3.html. Proposals should be sent to Cristen Hintze, Editor-in-Chief, at cristen.hintze@washburnlaw.edu. The Journal will consider proposals on a rolling basis.

 

This looks to be a very interesting event, so check it out.

-JH

September 14, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 26, 2016

Call for papers from the Center for Applied Feminism & Intersectionality

The Center for Applied Feminism (Baltimore) has a call for papers that will be of interest to some of our readers:

CALL FOR PAPERS

APPLIED FEMINISM AND INTERSECTIONALITY: 

EXAMINING LAW THROUGH THE LENS OF MULTIPLE IDENTITIES

The Center on Applied Feminism at the University of Baltimore School of Law seeks paper proposals for the Tenth Anniversary of the Feminist Legal Theory Conference.  We hope you will join us for this exciting celebration on March 30-31, 2017.

This year, the conference will explore how intersecting identities inform -- or should inform -- feminist legal theory and justice-oriented legal practice, legal systems, legal policy, and legal activism. Beginning in 1989, Kimberlé Crenshaw identified the need for law to recognize persons as representing multiple intersecting identities, not only one identity (such as female) to the exclusion of another (such as African American). Intersectionality theory unmasks how social systems oppress people in different ways.  While its origins are in exploring the intersection of race and gender, intersectionality theory now encompasses all intersecting identities including religion, ethnicity, citizenship, class, disability, and sexual orientation. Today, intersectionality theory is an important part of the Black Lives Matter and #SayHerName movements. For more information, see https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-theory/wp/2015/09/24/why-intersectionality-cant-wait/

We seek submissions of papers that focus on the topic of applied feminism and intersecting identities.  This conference aims to explore the following questions: What impact has intersectionality theory had on feminist legal theory?  How has it changed law and social policy? How does intersectionality help us understand and challenge different forms of oppression?  What is its transformative potential? What legal challenges are best suited to an intersectionality approach? How has intersectionality  theory changed over time and where might it go in the future?

We welcome proposals that consider these questions from a variety of substantive disciplines and perspectives. As always, the Center’s conference will serve as a forum for scholars, practitioners and activists to share ideas about applied feminism, focusing on connections between theory and practice to effectuate social change. The conference will be open to the public and will feature a keynote speaker. Past keynote speakers have included Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, Dr. Maya Angelou, Gloria Steinem, Senators Barbara Mikulski and Amy Klobuchar, NOW President Terry O’Neill, EEOC Commissioner Chai Feldblum, and U.S. District Judge Nancy Gertner.

To submit a paper proposal, please submit an abstract by Friday October 28, 2016 to ubfeministconference@gmail.com. Your abstract must contain your full contact information and professional affiliation, as well as an email, phone number, and mailing address. In the “Re” line, please state: CAF Conference 2017. Abstracts should be no longer than one page. We will notify presenters of selected papers in November. About half the presenter slots will be reserved for authors who commit to publishing in the annual symposium volume of the University of Baltimore Law Review. Thus, please indicate at the bottom of your abstract whether you are submitting (1) solely to present or (2) to present and publish in the symposium volume. Authors who are interested in publishing in the Law Review will be strongly considered for publication. For all presenters, working drafts of papers will be due no later than March 3, 2017. Presenters are responsible for their own travel costs; the conference will provide a discounted hotel rate as well as meals.

We look forward to your submissions. If you have further questions, please contact Prof. Margaret Johnson at majohnson@ubalt.edu. For additional information about the conference, please visit law.ubalt.edu/caf.

MM

August 26, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia, Employment Common Law, Employment Discrimination, Labor Law, Labor/Employment History, Pension and Benefits, Public Employment Law, Religion, Scholarship, Wage & Hour, Worklife Issues, Workplace Safety | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

COSELL Website Open for Registration

11th ANNUAL COLLOQUIUM FOR SCHOLARSHIP IN LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW (COSELL) - SEATTLE, WA - 23 (Friday) and 24(Saturday) September 2016

Information and link to registration:  http://www.law.uw.edu/events/cosell

Registration:  https://www.law.washington.edu/reg/cosell/default.aspx

The University of Washington and Seattle University will be co-sponsoring this year’s COSELL Conference on Friday and Saturday, September 23rd and 24th.  Rooms are being reserved at Hotel Deca, near the UW campus, for the nights of Thursday, Sept. 22nd through Saturday, Sept. 24th.  Rooms are priced at about $209/night - please reserve a hotel room as soon as possible given hotel attrition policies.   Light breakfast and lunch will be provided on Friday and Saturday, as well as a dinner on Friday night at the UW Club, overlooking Lake Washington.  Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is served by all major airlines, but particularly Alaska Air, Delta, Jet Blue and United.

The website has information about the hotel, and the registration page has space for you to enter your paper topic and an abstract.  Registration for the conference is open until 31 August 2016.  Please send any questions or concerns, whether it’s about the conference or “things to do in Seattle” to Prof. Lea Vaughn at lvaughn@uw.edu.  Thank you!

June 14, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia, Faculty Presentations, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 13, 2016

Call for Papers, AALS: Classifying Workers in the Gig Economy

AalsThe Executive Committee of the AALS Labor Relations and Employment Law Section announces that it is seeking abstracts as part of a Call for Papers to be presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting program in San Francisco. The program, titled Classifying Workers in the “Sharing” and “Gig” Economy, will take place on Thursday, January 5, 2017 from 8:30 am to 10:15 am.  Co-sponsored by the AALS Immigration Law, Business Associations, and Contracts Sections, this program will start immediately after a Breakfast jointly sponsored by the AALS Labor Relations and Employment Law and Employment Discrimination Sections held from 7 a.m. to 8:30 that morning.

This program will focus on the emerging trend of businesses using “on-demand” workers who share economic risks with those businesses as nominally independent contractors. These workers consider the job opportunity as an individual “gig,” characterized by flexibility conveniently gained from technology. State, federal, and local legislatures and related labor and employment law enforcement agencies have started to add items to this analysis beyond the typical “1099/W-2" common law control nomenclature. 

As a result, the question of who is an employee in the gig and sharing economy has become an ever-increasing concern. During the program, a panel of leading labor and employment law scholars will address this question from a multi-disciplinary approach including the examination of unique issues for business franchises and immigrant workers.

We are seeking an additional speaker who will present on a relevant topic, and we particularly encourage new voices to submit a paper abstract. Papers presented during this program may be published by the Employee Rights and Employment Policy Journal. To be considered as an additional speaker, please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words and a resume to Section Chair, Michael Z. Green, at mzgreen@law.tamu.edu by August 26, 2016.  The Executive Committee of the Section will decide on the additional speaker(s). Any selected speaker(s) will be responsible for his/her registration fee as well as hotel and travel expenses related to speaking at the program on January 5, 2017. Any inquiries about this Call for Papers should be submitted by e-mail to Professor Green.

MM

June 13, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia, Employment Common Law, Faculty Presentations, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (1)

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Annual Colloquium Save the Date

SAVE THE DATE: 11th ANNUAL COLLOQUIUM FOR SCHOLARSHIP IN LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW (COSELL) - SEATTLE, WA - 23 (Friday) and 24 (Saturday) September 2016

The University of Washington and Seattle University will be co-sponsoring this year’s COSELL Conference on Friday and Saturday, September 23rd and 24th.  Rooms are being reserved at Hotel Deca, near the UW campus, for the nights of Thursday, Sept. 22nd through Saturday, Sept. 24th.  Rooms are priced at about $209/night.  Light breakfast and lunch will be provided on Friday and Saturday, as well as a dinner on Friday night at the UW Club, overlooking Lake Washington.  Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is served by all major airlines, but particularly Alaska Air, Delta, Jet Blue and United.

The website will be posted soon.  In the meantime, please send an email indicating your interest and the title + abstract of any paper you wish to present to Prof. Lea Vaughn at lvaughn@uw.edu.  As soon as the site is up, she will let you know so that you can complete your formal registration. Thank you!

June 1, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Call for Papers: Marco Biagi Conference 2017

    Here's the call for papers for the 15th International Conference in Commemoration of Professor Marco Biagi (Modena, Italy, March 20-21, 2017). The conference theme is Digital and Smart Work. From the call:

Focusing on the implications for employment, digitalization may be provisionally defined as encompassing work operations and processes brokered, organized or performed within digital platforms or by means of digital devices. In this perspective, digitalization cuts across different forms of employment (standard and non-standard), work organization (in-house performance and ICT-based mobile work), categories of workers (skilled and unskilled) and productive processes (material and immaterial). . . . .

[T]he conference will seek contributions from the international scholarly community on the following tracks:
1. Digitalization and management practices.
2. Digitalization, productivity and the labour market.
3. Digitalization, employment rights and collective representation.

To contribute a paper, submit an expression of interest by July 1, 2016. For details, see the Conference call for papers ( Download Call for papers Marco Biagi Conference 2017_Def1)  as well as here for past Marco Biagi conferences.

 

--Sachin Pandya

 

H/t: Susan Bisom-Rapp

May 25, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia, International & Comparative L.E.L. | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 20, 2016

Call for Papers: National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions

HunterThe National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions has a Call for Papers for its 44th Annual Conference, taking place on March 26-28, 2017 in New York.  The Center " invites  the submission of abstracts for papers, presentations, and proposed workshops" and "also welcome proposals by scholars for presentations with respect to recently published books relevant to labor relations and collective bargaining."  Proposals should be submitted by September 30, 2016 to national.center@hunter.cuny.edu.  

You can see more info about the call here, including topics, which can include:

The Impact of Anti-Intellectualism on the State of Higher Education 

The Economics and Effect of College Sports on Campus

Federal & State Funding: Shifting Patterns and Changing Strategies

The Role of Endowments in Financing Higher Education
 
Solutions for Resolving the Student Debt Crisis 
 
Shared Governance and Collective Bargaining: The Line Between

Contingent Faculty Participation in Shared Governance

Negotiating Over Job Security and Research Funding for Adjunct Faculty
 
Online Learning: Best Labor-Management Practices 

Unionization of Graduate Students in the Private Sector: An Update
 
Wages, Benefits, and Pensions:  A Comparative Analysis 
 
Community Colleges: Contemporary Labor-Management Issues

Academic Freedom and Contingent Faculty

Bargaining Issues for Academics and Professionals in Non-Teaching Roles

Institutional Mergers, International Programs, and Collective Bargaining

Violence on Campus: Labor-Management Issues for Ensuring Safety

Collective Bargaining Regarding Campus Public Safety Officers
 
Title IX and Sexual Assault on Campus
 
FLSA: USDOL's New Final Rules

Age Discrimination on Campus

Diversity in the Composition of Collective Bargaining Teams
 
Collective Bargaining For Doctors, Interns, and Residents

The Unionization of Lawyers and Law Professors

Contract Negotiations in the Building Trades for Campus Construction
 
The Portrayal of Higher Education Labor Relations in Contemporary Fiction
 
-Jeff Hirsch
 
 

May 20, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Diversity in Higher Ed conference at Thomas Jefferson

Susan Bisom-Rapp (Thomas Jefferson) sends word of a conference at her school that will likely interest some of our readers:

Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Sixteenth Annual Women and the Law Conference

and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lecture Series

Pursuing Excellence:  Diversity in Higher Education

Friday February 5, 2016 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

5.5. hours Elimination of Bias MCLE

Thomas Jefferson School of Law’s 16th Annual Women and the Law Conference, Pursuing Excellence:  Diversity in Higher Education, will be held Friday, February 5, 2016 at Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego, California.

This conference brings together leading academics, educators, institutional leaders, and policy makers to examine how diversity in institutions of higher education affects and is inspired by students, faculty, and leaders. The conference will highlight a number of critically important topics including facilitating educational access for undocumented students, challenges to developing and nurturing a diverse educational environment, the importance of training students in professional programs (including medicine and law) to serve diverse populations, and challenges to affirmative action ranging from Prop 209 to the current U.S. Supreme Court case Fisher v. University of Texas

Professor Bryant Garth, Professor at UC Irvine School of Law and former Dean of Southwestern Law School and Indiana University School of Law, will deliver the Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lecture. He continues in a long line of illustrious speakers who have been honored as the Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lecturer, a lecture series Justice Ginsburg generously established for Thomas Jefferson in 2003.

Other speakers include:  Toni Atkins, Speaker of the California Assembly; Susan Bisom-Rapp, Professor of Law, Thomas Jefferson School of Law; Marisol Clark-Ibáñez, Professor of Sociology, Cal State University San Marcos; Youlonda Copeland-Morgan, Associate Vice Chancellor, Enrollment Management, UCLA; Meera E. Deo, Professor of Law, Thomas Jefferson School of Law; Adrian Gonzales, Interim Superintendent/President and  Vice President  of Student Services, Palomar Community College;  Vallera JohnsonAdministrative Law Judge; Catherine Lucey, Professor and Vice Dean for Education, UCSF School of Medicine; Mary Ann Mason, Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Center on Health, Economic, and Family Security, UC Berkeley; Linda Trinh Vo, Professor of Asian American Studies, UC Irvine;  Shirley Weber,  California Assemblywoman, Chair of the Assembly Select Committees on Higher Education and Campus Climate, former President of the San Diego Unified School District; and Susan Westerberg PragerDean, Southwestern Law School, former Dean UCLA School of Law, former Executive Director and CEO of AALS.

For additional information and registration, visit: http://www.tjsl.edu/conferences/wlc/2016.

MM

January 19, 2016 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 17, 2015

SEALS 2016 Call for Papers: New and Existing Voices in Labor and Employment Law

Seals logoFriend of the blog and Southeastern Association of Law Schools Labor and Employment Law Workshop organizer extraordinaire Michael Green (Texas A & M) sends along this call for papers for the 2016 SEALS annual conference:

The Southeastern Association of Law Schools(SEALS) is pleased to host the fourth annual “New Voices in Labor and Employment Law” program during the 2016 SEALS Annual Meeting in Amelia Island, Florida. This year we have extended the program to also include “Existing Voices in Labor and Employment Law.” The purpose of this works-in-progress program is to give junior and existing scholars feedback on papers from senior scholars before the upcoming submission cycle.  We are seeking submissions from labor and employment law scholars with five or fewer years of full-time teaching experience (not counting the 2015-16 academic year) and will also consider drafts from existing labor and employment scholars regardless of experience.

Submissions should be drafts of papers relating to labor and employment law that will be near completion by the time of the SEALS meeting held August 3-9, 2016.  To be considered for participation in the program, please send an email to Professor Michael Z. Green, Texas A&M University School of Law, at mzgreen@law.tamu.edu and arguthrie@law.tamu.edu by 5:00 p.m. E.S.T., Monday, January 11, 2016. In your email, please include the title of your paper, a short description of the context (e.g., “Disparate Impact after Dukes”), and a full abstract. Full-time faculty members of SEALS member or affiliate member schools, who have been teaching labor and employment law courses for five or fewer years as of July 1, 2015, will be given a preference in the selection of those contacted to submit final papers but we hope that labor and employment scholars with even more experience will submit papers as well. 

To ensure enough time for adequate feedback, space will be limited to 6 participants; additional registrants will be placed on a waiting list and invited to participate on a space available basis. Those individuals accepted into the program must submit a complete draft by 5:00 p.m. E.S.T., Friday, June 10, 2016. Please submit your drafts electronically to the email addresses above. The draft should be accompanied by a cover letter with the author’s name, contact information, and confirmation that the submission meets the criteria in this call for papers.

Submissions are limited to a maximum 40,000 word limit (including footnotes). Papers can be committed for publication prior to their submission as long as they are not actually scheduled to be printed prior to August 9, 2016. Each professor may submit only one paper for consideration. No papers will be accepted after the deadline and the submission of an incomplete draft may limit participation in this workshop.  Paper commentators may include Professors Brad Areheart (Tennessee), Anthony Baldwin (Mercer), Richard Bales (Ohio Northern), Scott Bauries (Kentucky), Theresa Beiner (Arkansas-Little Rock), Miriam Cherry (St. Louis), Brian Clarke (Charlotte), Michael Green (Texas A&M), Wendy Greene (Samford), Stacy Hawkins (Rutgers Camden), Jeff Hirsch (North Carolina), Nancy Levit (Missouri-Kansas City), Natasha Martin (Seattle), Marcia McCormick (St. Louis), Angela Onwuachi-Willig (Iowa), Elizabeth Pendo (St. Louis), Nicole Porter (Toledo), Jessica Roberts (Houston), Veronica Root (Notre Dame), Ani Satz (Emory), Paul Secunda (Marquette), Kerri Stone (Florida International), Michael Waterstone (Loyola), and others to be determined. 

Please be aware that selected participants and commentators are responsible for their own travel and lodging expenses related to attending the SEALS Annual Meeting, including the SEALS registration fee. Any inquiries about the SEALS New and Existing Voices in Labor and Employment Law Program should be submitted to Professor Michael Green at the email above.

 SEALS is a great conference because it is not overly formal, and people are quite approachable. Also, like many workshops in the labor and employment community, the commentators are usually supportive and really engaged. I always leave with more energy than I had when I arrived. We'll keep you posted on other programming as it's set.

MM

December 17, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia, Disability, Employment Common Law, Employment Discrimination, Faculty Presentations, International & Comparative L.E.L., Labor Law, Labor/Employment History, Pension and Benefits, Public Employment Law, Religion, Scholarship, Wage & Hour | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

ILR Review Call for Papers: Immigrant Legalization Initiatives

Kate Griffith (Cornell ILR School) writes to tell us about the ILR Review's call for papers, which is focusing on immigrant legalization.  The info:

 

ILR REVIEW: CALL FOR PAPERS

The Impact of Immigrant Legalization Initiatives:International Perspectives

The ILR Review [http://ilr.sagepub.com/] is calling for papers for a special issue on the impact of immigrant legalization initiatives. We seek innovative international and U.S.-sited research from a broad array of disciplines––including sociology, political science, economics, industrial relations, and law––that advances our understanding of the processes, outcomes, and policy implications of different approaches to the regularization of unauthorized immigrants. Submitted abstracts may reflect a range of methodologies, including surveys, qualitative or quantitative fieldwork, experiments, or the use of historical/archival data. The guest editors of this special issue are Maria Lorena Cook (mlc13@cornell.edu), Shannon Gleeson (smg338@cornell.edu), Kate Griffith (kg275@cornell.edu), and Lawrence Kahn (lmk12@cornell.edu).Prospective contributors are encouraged to consult any of the guest editors regarding preliminary proposals or ideas for papers.

The legalization, or regularization, of unauthorized immigrants has become an important and contentious policy issue in the United States and in countries around the world. While the United States is fairly unique in its long periods of legislative inaction regarding unauthorized immigrants, policies in other countries present a range of responses. In Europe, several countries have enacted periodic mass regularization programs or have provided for ongoing adjustment of status on a case-by-case basis. Traditional immigrant-sending countries in South America and Africa have recently instituted legalization programs as they become immigrant-destination countries as well. In the United States, temporary legalization measures, such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), provide further examples of limited deportation relief and work authorization.

These legalization initiatives around the world raise a number of questions. What are the impacts of regularization programs on immigrant workers, their families, and the communities in which they live? How does acquisition of legal status affect immigrants’ workplace conditions (health and safety, employment, wages, occupational mobility)? How do legalization programs affect the work and employment conditions of those who are excluded from such programs or who do not participate and retain their unauthorized immigration status? How does loss of legal status affect workers and their families?

This special issue of the ILR Review will be among the first to examine the impact of legalization initiatives on immigrant workers across the globe. We are interested in the effects of legalization programs on the working lives of unauthorized immigrants, as well as those in temporary legal statuses, and of unauthorized immigrants who remain outside the scope of these initiatives. We invite papers that analyze different worker outcomes: labor force participation, employment, wages, workplace health and safety, discrimination, organization, social and occupational mobility, and rights mobilization, among others. We are especially keen to receive papers that address these issues in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe, and the Middle East, as well as papers that compare national origin groups within a country or legalization initiatives and their impacts across countries or over time. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following.

  • Comparative impact of legalization programs. How do the structures of legalization programs affect employer practices and worker outcomes (employment, wages, working conditions, organization, access to legal protections)? What can we learn from different national and regional models of labor integration?Does the legal status “bump”––the gap between authorized and unauthorized workers––look different from place to place?
  • Comparative impact of legal status. How have different categories of legal status––including temporary and liminal legality––shaped worker outcomes and the well-being of families and communities? Do guest worker and other temporary programs necessarily produce better outcomes relative to those of unauthorized individuals? What are the lasting impacts, if any, of unauthorized status for workers? Does legal status matter more for some outcomes and processes than others? How does legal status intersect with other attributes and identities (race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, sexuality) to shape worker outcomes?
  • Immigration enforcement impact. How do changes in immigration regimes affect a national labor force over time? How have increases in deportations affected worker outcomes? How have sub-national (region, state, province, municipality) immigration enforcement policies affected unauthorized workers? To what extent do changes in immigration law affect workers’ rights enforcement efforts?
  • Legal mobilization and worker rights. What is the relationship between immigration status and workers’ willingness to demand, either individually or collectively, improved working conditions? How do changes in immigration status affect workers’ willingness to confront employers, speak to coworkers, or pursue formal channels of restitution when their rights are violated? How does immigration status affect workers’ willingness to participate in organizing efforts, including but not limited to union activity?

Anticipated Timeline: Prospective contributors should submit a detailed abstract of their research to ilrr@cornell.edu no later than January 31, 2016. The abstracts should include the research question(s), theoretical argument, contribution to the literature, detailed methodology, and anticipated empirical findings. The editors will review the abstracts and invite selected contributors by March 31, 2016. Full papers will be due by September 15, 2016. All papers will undergo the normal peer review process.

 

-JH 

October 27, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Info for AALS Newsletter

The AALS L&E Sections are seeking info for the joint newsletter--please send it in soon!  The same goes for those interested in case briefs.

 

Dear Colleagues:

We are reaching out once again to request information for our joint annual newsletter for the AALS Section on Employment Discrimination and the Section on Labor Relations and Employment Law. Please forward this message to any and all people you know who teach or write in the Employment Discrimination, Labor Law, and Employment Law fields. 

First, if you have news of any faculty visits, lateral moves, entry-level hires, or promotions and tenure, please e-mail that news to Danielle Weatherby at dweath@uark.edu.

Second, please also e-mail Danielle Weatherby with any information about conference announcements and calls for papers, employment or fellowship opportunities, honors and awards, and reports on recent conferences or other events of interest to the two Sections’ members.

Third, we want to include a list of relevant employment or labor law-related publications published in 2015.  Please hold your forthcoming 2016 publications for next year’s newsletter. These publications can be books, articles, and chapters. Please also send a list of your 2015 publications to Danielle Weatherby.

Fourth and finally, we want to solicit anyone who would be interested in writing a brief description (no more than a page or two) of a recent important labor and employment case or any significant new labor or employment legislation. Your subject could be a recent Supreme Court decision (including Young v. UPS, Inc.,  EEOC v. Abercrombie and Fitch, or the granting of cert. in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association), a significant circuit court decision or emerging circuit split, a state supreme court decision, or an innovative and potentially influential new federal, state, or local law. The description should be fairly short. If you're looking for an   easy way to get your name out there or want a quick outlet for your ruminations about a case or new law, this could be a good opportunity, as the newsletter is widely circulated. Just let us know what you are interested in writing about. Please send your submissions to Naomi Schoenbaum at nschoenbaum@law.gwu.edu.

Please send all submissions by November 1, 2015.

Thank you very much for your help!

Best regards,

Danielle Weatherby & Naomi Schoenbaum

October 20, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia, Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

CFP for the Marco Biagi Award

To stimulate scholarly activity and broaden academic interest in comparative labour and employment law, the International Association of Labour Law Journals announces a Call for Papers for the 2016 Marco Biagi Award. The award is named in honor of the late Marco Biagi, a distinguished labour lawyer, victim of terrorism because of his commitment to civil rights, and one of the founders of the Association. The Call is addressed to doctoral students, advanced professional students, and academic researchers in the early stage of their careers (that is, with no more than three years of post-doctoral or teaching experience).

1.  The Call requests papers concerning comparative and/or international labour or employment law and employment relations, broadly conceived.  Research of an empirical nature within the Call’s purview is most welcome.

 2.  Submissions will be evaluated by an academic jury to be appointed by the Association. Submitted papers should include an abstract.

3.  The paper chosen as the winner of the award will be assured publication in a member journal, subject to any revisions requested by that journal.

4.  Papers may be submitted preferably in English, but papers in French or Spanish will also be accepted.  The maximum length is in the range of 12,500 words, including footnotes and appendices. Substantially longer papers will not be considered.

5.  The author or authors of the paper chosen as the winner of the award will be invited to present the work at the Association’s 2016 meeting which is to be announced soon on the website of the Association.  Efforts are being undertaken to provide an honarium and travel expenses for the presentation of the paper.  Until that effort bears fruit, however, the Association hopes that home institutional funds would be available to support the researcher’s presentation.

6.  The deadline for submission is 31 March 2016.  Submissions should be sent electronically in Microsoft Word both to Lavoro e diritto at lavoroediritto@unife.it andto Frank Hendrickx, the President of the Association, at Frank.Hendrickx@law.kuleuven.be

CAS, h/t to Steve Willborn

October 14, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 10, 2015

Seton Hall's Tenth Forum

Announcing…
The Tenth Annual
Seton Hall
Employment & Labor Law Scholars’ Forum
Friday, October 9, 2015

 The Forum is designed to provide junior scholars with commentary and critique by their more senior colleagues in the legal academy and, more broadly, to foster development and understanding of new scholarly currents across employment and labor law.

To that end, Seton Hall will convene its 10th annual Employment & Labor Law Scholars’ Forum on Friday, October 9, 2015. This year’s Forum will feature three presenters:

Naomi Sunshine
Acting Assistant Professor of Lawyering
New York University School of Law

Heather M. Whitney
Lecturer in Law and Bigelow Teaching Fellow
University of Chicago Law School

Sarah M. Stephens
Employment Attorney, Cox Automotive, Inc.

 The paper topics are:

Independent Contractor Drivers: Where Are We Heading?
Naomi Sunshine

Corporate Promises to be Good: An Institutional Solution
Heather M. Whitney

An Employer’s Conscience after Hobby Lobby and the Continuing Conflict
between Women’s Rights and Religious Freedom
Sarah M. Stephens


Comment and critique will be provided by the following scholars:

Timothy P. Glynn, Professor of Law, Seton Hall University School of Law
Tristin K. Green, Professor of Law, University of San Francisco School of Law
Michael C. Harper, Barreca Labor Relations Scholar Professor of Law,
              Boston University School of Law
Joseph Slater, Eugene N. Balk Professor of Law and Values
              University of Toledo College of Law
Charles A. Sullivan, Professor of Law, Seton Hall University School of Law
Michael J. Zimmer, Professor of Law, Loyola University of Chicago School of Law

 

CAS

August 10, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 20, 2015

Deadline Approaching for the 10th Annual Colloquium

If you are planning to attend the annual Colloquium on Scholarship in Employment and Labor Law (COSELL), please remember to register. This conference, now in its tenth year, brings together labor and employment law professors from across the country. It offers participants the opportunity to present works-in-progress to a friendly and knowledgeable audience. It will be held at Indiana University Maurer School of Law, Sept. 11-12, 2015, in Bloomington, Indiana.

More information and links to register are available at: http://www.law.indiana.edu/cosellThe registration deadline is August 1.

MM

July 20, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia, Faculty Presentations, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

LawAsia Employment Conference 2015

LawasiaOn the heels of Jeff's announcement of international labor conferences, Bernard Banks (Keily Thompson, New Zealand) writes to tell us of the LawAsia Employment Conference that will be held in Hanoi on 14 -15 August 2015. Here are the details:

The theme of the Hanoi conference  is: Free Trade Agreements and Trans National Employment –Legal Implications, and following the formal opening and keynote address there will be seven business sessions provisionally entitled: employment impacts of  FTAs –a regional overview;  immigration issues in trans  national employment;  minimum terms and conditions –employment obligations in host countries; liability for workplace injuries to trans national employees –issues and case studies;  cross border taxation issues for employers and employees; liability for actions  in host countries – employee obligations and employer liability;  and a concluding panel discussion and forum including an international round up of FTA employment  issues and contributions from delegates. We are in close liaison with the Vietnam Bar Federation which has  a co-hosting role.

rb

May 26, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia, International & Comparative L.E.L., Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 22, 2015

International Labor Law Conferences

GLobeThere are two international labor and employment law conferences coming up in the next month or so.  First up is the second Labor Law Research Network conference in Amsterdam, from June 25-27, 2015.  You can see the program here.

The International Society for Labour and Social Security Law is also holding its second conference, in Venice from June 30-July 9, 2015.  You can see the program here.

-JH

 

May 22, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 21, 2015

The 2015 Marco Biagi Award

The winner of the 2015 Marco Biagi Award is Uladzislau Belavusau (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands) for a paper entitled A Penalty Card for Homophobia from EU Labor Law: Comment on Asociaţia ACCEPT (C-81/12). In the paper, the author provides a detailed analysis of Asociaţia ACCEPT, an important case from the Court of Justice of the European Union on sexual orientation discrimination. The Court held (1) that an employer could be found liable for the discriminatory statement of a person who is publicly perceived as playing a leading role for the employer, even though the person does not have the legal capacity to bind the employer and (2) that national rules prohibiting such discrimination must be effective, proportionate, and dissuasive. Professor Belavusau evaluates the case as an example of cause lawyering that could be used as a model of legal mobilization for LGBT advocates and for other social movements.

 The International Association of Labor Law Journals sponsors the Marco Biagi Award in honor of one of the founders of the Association: Marco Biagi, a distinguished labor lawyer and a victim of terrorism because of his commitment to social justice. A list of the member journals of the International Association can be found at http://www.labourlawjournals.com.

This year’s winner was chosen by an academic jury composed of Frank Hendrickx (Belgium), Alan Neal (UK), and György Kiss (Hungary).

Prior winners of the Marco Biagi Award were:

2014    Lilach Lurie (Bar-Ilan University, Israel), Do Unions Promote Gender Equality?

 Specially Noted  ̶   Isabelle Martin (University of Montreal, Canada), Corporate Social Rsponsibility as Work Law? A Critical Assessment in the Light of the Principle of Human Dignity

 2013    Aline Van Bever (University of Leuven, Belgium), The Fiduciary Nature of the Employment Relationship

 2012    Diego Marcelo Ledesma Iturbide (Buenos Aires University, Argentina), Una propuesta para la reformulación de la conceptualización tradicional de la relación de trabajo a partir del relevamiento de su especificidad jurídica

 Specially Noted  ̶  Apoorva Sharma (National Law University, India), Towards an Effective Definition of Forced Labor

2011    Beryl Ter Haar (Universiteit Leiden, the Netherlands), Attila Kun (Károli Gáspár University, Hungary) & Manuel Antonio Garcia-Muñoz Alhambra (University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain), Soft On The Inside; Hard For the Outside.An Analysis of the Legal Nature of New Forms of International Labour Law  

Specially Noted  ̶  Mimi Zou (Oxford University, Great Britain), Labour Relations With “Chinese  Characteristics”? Chinese Labour  Law at an Historic Crossroad 

2010    Virginie Yanpelda, (Université de Douala, Cameroun), Travail décent et diversité des rapports de travail

 Specially Noted  ̶  Marco Peruzzi (University of Verona, Italy), Autonomy in the European social dialogue.

2009    Orsola Razzolini (Bocconi University, Italy), The Need to Go Beyond the Contract:  “Economic” and “Bureaucratic” Dependence in Personal Work Relations

 CAS

 

 

 

May 21, 2015 in Beltway Developments, Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Call for Papers: Marco Biagi Foundation

Susan Bisom-Rapp (Thomas Jefferson) sends along the annual call for papers for the 14thInternational Conference in Commemoration of Professor Marco Biagi and the Fifth Young Scholars’ Workshop in Labour Relations.  The theme of the 2016 conference is Well Being At and Through Work, a topic that could not be more timely given the lingering effects of the global economic crisis on working people.  In addition, in connection with the Young Scholars’ Workshop, this year the Foundation is awarding a Marco Biagi Prize, which will allow the author of the best paper to take up a three-month residence at the Foundation and comes with a prize of 3500 euros. 

For more details, see the Conference call for papers, Download Marco Biagi Conference 2016, and the Young Scholars call for papers,  Download Call YSW 2016.

MM

April 30, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia, Faculty Presentations, International & Comparative L.E.L., Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Harris on Department of Labor Performance

Seth-HarrisSeth Harris, Distinguished Scholar at Cornell's ILR School, has just posted on SSRN his article, Managing for Social Change: Improving Labor Department Performance in a Partisan Era, which will appear in the West Virginia Law Review.  The abstract:

This article tells the story of the successful effort to turn around the Labor Department’s performance during the first five years of the Obama Administration. The Labor Department leadership team, largely chosen for its policy expertise rather than any management experience, used common-sense performance measurement and management to improve workers’ lives and the nation’s economy. The article critiques the two principal laws that purport to structure and guide the executive branch’s performance planning and explains how the Labor Department succeeded in improving its performance despite these laws and Congress’ lack of interest in implementing them or holding agencies accountable for compliance or good performance. The article also offers a reform agenda for improving federal government performance both through congressional action and activist stakeholder engagement.

I saw Seth present this paper at a West Virginia University Symposium, and it was really interesting.  That's right, it's about managerial performance measures and it was really interesting.  Don't believe me?  Read the article.

-JH

 

April 29, 2015 in Conferences & Colloquia, Labor and Employment News, Labor Law | Permalink | Comments (0)