Friday, May 20, 2005

New Employment Law Blog

Welcoming to the blogosphere a new blog from Shepard Mullin Richter & Hampton - Labor & Employment Law Blog.  Good Bluck!

May 20, 2005 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Labor Quote Quiz - Answer

Here is the answer to this week (May 16) Labor Quote of the Week from BigLabor.com.

Who said?

Wages ought not to be insufficient to support a frugal and well-behaved wage-earner.

And the answer is....

--Pope Leo XIII—1891

May 20, 2005 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, May 19, 2005

NYT 's Series of Class in America

The third installment in the NYT's series of class in America - When Richer Weds Poorer, Money Isn't the Only Difference (by Tamar Lewin).  Here is an excerpt:

Marriages that cross class boundaries may not present as obvious a set of challenges as those that cross the lines of race or nationality. But in a quiet way, people who marry across class lines are also moving outside their comfort zones, into the uncharted territory of partners with a different level of wealth and education, and often, a different set of assumptions about things like manners, food, child-rearing, gift-giving and how to spend vacations. In cross-class marriages, one partner will usually have more money, more options and, almost inevitably, more power in the relationship.

May 19, 2005 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Blogging about Work

Good story in NPR's Morning Edition about Los Alamos Laboratory's employees blogging about their jobs.

Los Alamos National Lab Blog Draws Ire on Hill (by David Kestenbaum)

Last winter, a scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory began a Web log, or blog, for employees to post concerns and complaints about fixing problems at the government nuclear facility. But now, some members of Congress who've seen the blog see it as a reason to shut Los Alamos down.

May 19, 2005 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, May 18, 2005

Labor Quote Quiz - Answer

Who said?

Wages ought not to be insufficient to support a frugal and well-behaved wage-earner.

For the answer, check back here this coming Friday, or if you can't wait go to BigLabor.com Labor Quote of the Week.

May 18, 2005 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 16, 2005

NYT 's Series of Class in America

Yesterday the NYT began a series of class differences in the United States.  Below are links to the first two articles and a brief summary.

Class in America: Shadowy Lines That Still Divide

Over the next three weeks, The Times will publish a series of articles on class in America, a dimension of the national experience that tends to go unexamined, if acknowledged at all. With class now seeming more elusive than ever, the articles take stock of its influence in the lives of individuals: a lawyer who rose out of an impoverished Kentucky hollow; an unemployed metal worker in Spokane, Wash., regretting his decision to skip college; a multimillionaire in Nantucket, Mass., musing over the cachet of his 200-foot yacht.

The series does not purport to be all-inclusive or the last word on class. It offers no nifty formulas for pigeonholing people or decoding folkways and manners. Instead, it represents an inquiry into class as Americans encounter it: indistinct, ambiguous, the half-seen hand that upon closer examination holds some Americans down while giving others a boost.

Life at the Top in America Isn't Just Better, It's Longer

Class is a potent force in health and longevity in the United States. The more education and income people have, the less likely they are to have and die of heart disease, strokes, diabetes and many types of cancer. Upper-middle-class Americans live longer and in better health than middle-class Americans, who live longer and better than those at the bottom. And the gaps are widening, say people who have researched social factors in health.

May 16, 2005 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)