Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Career Advice for Intenational Lawyers and Law Students

Here's a link to an article of mine from the ILSA Journal of International and Comparative Law that may include some useful career advice.  It's on the Social Science Research Network (an often-overlooked and highly useful source for legal research if you don't know it).  Create a free account and download the article to read it.

Practical Career Advice for Young International Lawyers: How to Build a Killer Resume, Network Effectively, Create Your Own Opportunities, and Live Happily Ever After

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1146483

(mew)

February 24, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

UN Secretary-General Meets With Ukraine's Foreign Minister

Ki-moon-ukraineThe United Nations Secretary-General met yesterday in New York with the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine, Pavlo Klimkin, to discuss the conflict in the east of that country.

The two discussed the UN's humanitarian and human rights work in affected areas and they agreed on the need for urgent and full implementation of the 12 February 'Package of Measures for the implementation of the Minsk Agreement,' including a lasting and durable cease-fire and immediate withdrawal of heavy weaponry.

Last week, the Council endorsed the so-called 'Package of Measures' with the unanimous adoption of Resolution 2202 (2015) and called on all parties to the conflict to fully implement the cessation of hostilities, as the UN human rights office expressed concern over reported shelling and trapped civilians in the country's east.

Measures outlined in the text also included the withdrawal of all foreign armed formations, military equipment and mercenaries from the territory of Ukraine under the monitoring of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), as well as the disarmament of all illegal groups.

On the subject of a peacekeeping mission in eastern Ukraine, the Secretary-General noted that the UN would be guided by the Security Council on the matter and reiterated his full support toward a peaceful resolution of the conflict.

UN Press Release / UN Photo of Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon with Pavlo Klimkin, Foreign Minister of Ukraine /Eskinder Debebe

February 24, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Texas or England? The Contact's Choice of Forum Clause Can Bind Non-Parties to a Contract, Even When the Chosen Law Will Not Allow the Cause of Action

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit reminds us in a new decision that a choice of forum clause in a contract can bind entities that are not parties to that contract.  You may have to sue in England instead of Texas after all, even if English law won't allow the cause of action you're trying to bring.  Click here to read the majority and dissenting opinions in the new case of In re Lloyd's Register North America, No. 14-20554 (5th Cir. Feb. 18, 2015).

(mew)

February 24, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

New Rules for Enforcing European Judgments Within Europe (and a Small Reminder About the Hague Choice of Courts Convention)

European Union Regulation 44/2001 has been updated by European Union Regulation 1215/2012, a regulation adopted on December 12, 2012 (hey, that was 12/12/12) and that became effective last month on January 10, 2015.  It has some substantial improvements over the earlier procedures to enforce judgments within Europe and contains some important protections for both plaintiffs and defendants.  Do a quick google search for the new regulation and you'll find plenty of commentary on the new rules.

The EU regulation has been described as the equivalent of the Full Faith and Credit Clause of the U.S. Constitution, which allows enforcement of one U.S. state’s judgment within another U.S. state.  For judgments outside the United States, the judicial doctrine of comity applies as there is yet no treaty in force requiring U.S. courts to recognize foreign judgments (or requiring foreign courts to recognize U.S. judgments).

There is such a treaty drafted, however:  The Hague Choice of Courts Convention adopted in June  2005.  It has not yet entered into force even though it requires only two states to become parties.  Mexico lead the way by its accession in September 2007, so only one other party is necessary.  

Who might be that next party?  The United States signed the Choice of Courts Convention in January 2009 and the European Union signed in April 2009.  (The treaty allows signatures by individual countries or by regional units like the European Union -- that itself is an important development in treaty law.)  

(mew)

 

February 24, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, February 23, 2015

A New International Criminal Court for the Central African Republic?

There has been much discussion in recent weeks over the possibility of a new international criminal court for the Central African Republic (CAR) to address war crimes committed during internal armed conflict there beginning in 2012.  Last month, the United Nations International Commission of Inquiry on the Central African Republic called for the establishment of a new international criminal tribunal which would be charged with the investigation and prosecution of war crimes in the CAR since January 2, 2012.  Human Rights Watch and other organizations are joining their voices in calling for the establishment of a special tribunal as well.

The UN International Commission of Inquiry emphasized that the judges should come from other countries so that they are objective and independent.  However, a draft law negotiated between the UN and the CAR now under consideration by the transitional parliament in the CAR would establish a Special Criminal Court with mixed membership, with approximately half the judges coming from other countries and the other half of the judges coming from the CAR.

The work of the Special Criminal Court, if created, would complement the work of the International Criminal Court (ICC), which already has been investigating allegations of war crimes in the CAR since 2012.  The ICC would handle the most serious international crimes, leaving the remaining prosecutions to the Special Criminal Court.

A major stumbling block is that no country has offered to fund the creation of such a tribunal, and the CAR does not have the resources to do so itself. Advocacy organizations are calling on the international community and especially the Central African Republic to fund the tribunal.

(cgb)

February 23, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, February 22, 2015

Call for Presenters: Global Legal Skills Conference

The Global Legal Skills conference, in its 10th year, will be held in Chicago, the city of its origin. The Conference began in Chicago at The John Marshall Law School, where it was held three times. It has also traveled to Mexico (twice), to Costa Rica (twice), to Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., and most recently to the University of Verona Faculty of Law in Verona, Italy.

This year’s conference (GLS 10) will be held at The John Marshall Law School for the first two days and will be hosted at Northwestern University School of Law for its final day. The two schools are within walking distance and are also served by subway line

The first call for proposals for presentations has already closed and acceptance messages are going out to those who submitted.  This is the second call for presenters. Proposals should be for a 25-minute presentation (for one or two people) or an interactive group panel presentation (no more than four panelists) of 75-minutes (including audience participation).

The conference audience will include legal writing professionals, international and comparative law professors, clinical professors and others involved in skills education, law school administrators, law librarians, and ESL/EFL professors and scholars. Also attending will be faculty members teaching general law subjects with a transnational or international component. Attendees have also included judges, lawyers, court translators, and others involved in international and transnational law. Attendees come from around the world, and as many as 35 countries have been represented in past conferences.

Please submit a proposal on any aspect of Global Legal Skills, including experiential learning, distance education, comparative law, international law, course design and materials, teaching methods, and opportunities for teaching abroad and in the United States. However, because the conference focuses on legal skills for a global audience, please tailor your proposal accordingly.

The schedule for GLS 10 will allow for professional networking opportunities and development and also a chance to take in the many sites (and excellent restaurants!) Chicago has to offer. Chicago is served by two airports, O’Hare and Midway, making travel to the city easy. The timing of the conference (the week before Memorial Day weekend) is intended to allow you to spend extra time exploring Chicago and its environs at a time when the temperatures are moderate and the skies are clear.

This is a self-funded academic conference, and as in past years, presenters will be asked to pay the registration fee of $225.00. A small number of need-based scholarships will also be available, especially for participants from outside the United States. Additional tickets for family members and friends will also be available for the walking tour, law school reception, and Union League Club Gala Dinner. Chicago in the springtime is a great travel destination for families where they can enjoy Millennium Park, two world class zoos, and the amazing Museum Campus.

You may submit more than one proposal but because of high demand for speaking slots you will only be allowed to speak on one panel.

Please send program proposals to GLS10Chicago@gmail.com. You can also send a copy to Lurene Contento (Program Chair of GLS 10). Her email is 9Content@jmls.edu.

Please include “GLS 10 Proposal” in the subject line. Then, list the names and institutional affiliations of presenters, the title of your presentation, a brief summary of your presentation, the format you would prefer (25 minutes or 75 minutes), and the target audience.

You will find travel information and more conference information on the GLS website, glsc.jmls.edu/2015. Additional proposals will be accepted through April 15 if additional speaking slots are available.

Spanish Language CLE Proposals

You may also submit proposals for CLE presentations in Spanish. A Spanish-language CLE track will include sessions for attorneys, law students, and court translators. Persons submitting proposals for presentations in Spanish may also submit a proposal in English as an exception to the single presentation rule. Proposals are sought on topics such as “Introduction to Mexican Law,” “Understanding the Amparo,” and “Latin American Corporation Law.”

Scholars’ Forum (Tues. May 19, 2015)

A one-day scholars’ forum is also planned for May 19th, the day before the GLS conference begins. Participation in this forum will be limited to 16 persons and will include special sessions on international legal research as well as the presentation of papers and works-in-progress. For more information about the Scholars’ Forum, send an email to Prof. Mark E. Wojcik at mwojcik@jmls.edu with the title of your proposed work. Registration for the scholars’ forum is at this link: http://events.jmls.edu/registration/node/677

We hope to see you in Chicago this May for the 10th anniversary of the Global Legal Skills Conference!

Thank you,

Prof. Mark E. Wojcik, Chair, Global Legal Skills Conference
Prof. Lurene Contento, Chair GLS 10 Program Committee, The John Marshall Law School

February 22, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, February 21, 2015

2015 Jessup Results: India

The winners of the 2015 Indian National Rounds in the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition are:

  • First Place - Jindal Global Law SchoolS
  • Second Place - NALSAR University of Law
  • Third Place - National Law School of India University
  • Fourth Place - National Law University Jodhpur.

2015 is the 56th year of the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition, the world's largest moot court competition.  Participants compete from over 550 law schools in more than 80 countries. The Competition simulates a fictional dispute between countries before the International Court of Justice, the judicial organ of the United Nations. One team is allowed to participate from every eligible school. Teams prepare oral and written pleadings arguing both the applicant and respondent positions of the case. For more information about the Jessup Competition, visit the website of the International Law Students Association.

(mew)

February 21, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

2015 Jessup Results: Russia

Congratulations to the winners of the 2015 Russian National Rounds in the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. 

  • First place was St. Petersburg State University
  • Second Place was the Russian Foreign Trade Academy
  • Third Place was Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), and
  • Fourth Place was the Urals State Law Academy.

2015 is the 56th year of the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition, the world's largest moot court competition.  Participants compete from over 550 law schools in more than 80 countries. The Competition simulates a fictional dispute between countries before the International Court of Justice, the judicial organ of the United Nations. One team is allowed to participate from every eligible school. Teams prepare oral and written pleadings arguing both the applicant and respondent positions of the case.

For more information about the Jessup Competition, visit the website of the International Law Students Association.

(mew)

February 21, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

International Law Weekend 2015 - Call for Panel Proposals

Deadline: March 20, 2015

The sponsors of International Law Weekend 2015 (ILW 2015) invite proposals for panels, roundtables, and lectures. ILW 2015 is scheduled to be held on November 5-7, 2015, in New York City.

ILW is sponsored and organized by the American Branch of the International Law Association (ABILA) – which welcomes new members from academia, the practicing bar, and the diplomatic world – and the International Law Students Association (ILSA). This annual conference attracts an audience of more than eight hundred academics, diplomats, members of the governmental and nongovernmental sectors, and foreign policy and law students.

Call for Proposals

The unifying theme for ILW 2015 is Global Problems, Legal Solutions: Challenges for Contemporary International Lawyers.

ILW 2015 will explore the many roles that international law plays in addressing global challenges. The aim is to provide an opportunity for discussion and debate about the ways in which international law provides fundamental tools and mechanisms to address emerging global issues. ILW 2015 will offer engaging panels on current problems and innovative solutions in both public and private international law.

The ILW Organizing Committee invites proposals to be submitted online on or before Friday, March 20, 2015 by clicking here to use the ILW Panel Proposal Submission Form.

Panel proposals may concern any aspect of contemporary international law and practice, including:

  • international arbitration,
  • international environmental law,
  • national security,
  • cyber law,
  • use of force,
  • human rights and humanitarian law,
  • international organizations,
  • international criminal law,
  • international intellectual property,
  • the law of the sea,
  • space law,and
  • transnational commercial and trade law.

When submitting your proposal, please identify the primary areas of international law that your proposed panel will address. We also ask that you provide a brief description of the topic, and the names, titles, and affiliations of the chair and likely speakers. One of the objectives of ILW 2015 is to promote new dialogues among scholars and practicing lawyers, so all panels should include presenters with diverse experiences and perspectives.

On the submission form, you will be asked to describe what you think would be the most engaging and exciting format for your proposed program. The organizers encourage suggestions of varied formats, such as debates, roundtables, lectures, and break-out groups, as well as the usual practice of panel presentations. Additionally, they encourage you to consider taking the necessary steps to qualify your panel for CLE credit. They hope to offer at least seven panels qualifying for CLE.

ILW 2015

ILW 2015 is scheduled to be held at 42 West 44th Street on Thursday evening, November 5, and at Fordham Law School at Lincoln Center on November 6-7, 2015. The ABILA Annual meeting will also be held during ILW 2015 at the same location.

The audience will include practitioners, academics, UN diplomats, business leaders, federal and state government officials, NGO leaders, writers, journalists, and interested citizens. We plan to have a broad array of both public international law and private international law topics in each program timeslot. For questions regarding ILW 2015, please contact conferences@ilsa.org.

2015 ILW Program Committee Members

  • Chiara Giorgetti, Assistant Professor of Law Faculty Director, LLM Program Richmond School of Law
  • David P. Stewart, President, ABILA, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Santiago Villalpando, Acting Chief, Treaty Section, Office of Legal Affairs United Nations
  • Jeremy Sharpe, Chief of Investment Arbitration Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State
  • Tessa Walker, Programs Director, ILSA

Hat tip to David Stewart

(mew)

February 21, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, February 20, 2015

Development Agenda Must Include Rights of Persons with Disabilities

“One billion people – 15 per cent of the world’s population – are persons with disabilities, and their rights cannot be ignored,” a group of United Nations human rights experts said today, as they urged negotiators and UN Member States to include rights of such persons in the new development framework. 

The call came as the second session of negotiations on the post-2015 development agenda closes this week in New York. 

The 17 new post-2015 sustainable development goals (SDGs), crafted by an Open Working Group of the UN General Assembly on the issues and expected to be adopted in September 2015, will succeed replace and expand the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and will frame agendas and policies for the next 15 years. 

“No one should be left behind if we want to ensure a fully inclusive society for all,” the group of three UN human rights experts said in a statement, urging international negotiators and all UN Member States to firmly include the human rights of persons with disabilities in the new development framework. 

“The inclusion of persons with disabilities in the SDGs is fundamental if we are to achieve sustainable development that is genuinely rights-based,” said the UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities, Catalina Devandas Aguilar. “Whereas people with disabilities were invisible within the MDGs, we have seen promising advances in ensuring that the new development framework is sustainable, inclusive and accessible.”

The UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food, Hilal Elver, drew attention to the issue of food security. 

“We know that nutrition and disability are closely linked. Both children and adults are often discriminated against, due to social stigma and negative cultural norms,” Ms. Elver said.

Worldwide, an estimated 805 million people are chronically undernourished. Since many persons with disabilities live in absolute poverty, these two large populations overlap to a considerable extent, making food security of utmost importance. 

States are particularly responsible for making sure that vulnerable and marginalised people, including those with disabilities, are able to access adequate and nutritious food, she said. 

“Food must be physically and economically accessible,” Ms. Elver added. “To achieve this, States must ensure that a disability perspective is taken fully into account in nutrition policy and programming, maternal and child health policy, and broader health initiatives.” 

The UN Independent Expert on the enjoyment of all human rights by older persons, Rosa Kornfeld-Matte, called on Member States to give particular attention to the situation of older persons with disabilities in the current negotiations. 

“Although disability should not be associated with ageing, it is frequent in old age and thus requires resources to ensure access to different services, including education, healthcare and social protection and poverty reduction programmes,” she pointed out. 

“An age-sensitive approach should be incorporated in the new development framework to enable all persons with disabilities, including older persons, to fully enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms,” Ms. Kornfeld-Matte emphasized. 

The independent experts are part of what is known as the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council. Special Procedures, the largest body of independent experts in the UN Human Rights system, is the general name of the Human Rights Council’s independent fact-finding and monitoring mechanisms that address either specific country situations or thematic issues in all parts of the world. 

Special Procedures’ experts work on a voluntary basis; they are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work.

(UN press release)

February 20, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Happy Chinese New Year!

Best wishes for a happy, healthy and prosperous new year to all our friends celebrating the Chinese New Year 2015 (the year of the goat or sheep).

(cgb and mew)

February 19, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

ICJ Schedules Public Hearings in Two Cases: Bolivia v. Chile and Costa Rica v. Nicaragua

The International Court of Justice (ICJ) announced that it will hold public hearings in  two cases in April and May 2015.

The first hearing will be held April 14 through May 1 in the combined cases of Certain Activities Carried Out By Nicaragua in the Border Area and Construction of a Road in Costa Rica along the San Juan River between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. More information may be found on the ICJ website.

The second hearing relates to a case brought by the Plurinational State of Bolivia against the Republic of Chile on the Obligation to Negotiate Access to the Pacific Ocean.  The hearings will focus solely on Chile's preliminary objection to the court's jurisdiction.  These hearings are scheduled to take place from Monday May 4, 2015 to Friday, May 8, 2015.  Click here for more information about the case and about how to attend the hearing.

(mew and  cgb)

February 18, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, February 12, 2015

US Requests Consultations with China at WTO Over Alleged Export Subsidies

The United States formally requested consultations with China at the World Trade Organization (WTO) yesterday with respect to alleged export-contingent subsidies.  The United States alleges that China designates a cluster of enterprises in a certain industry as a Demonstration Base and then provides export-contingent subsidies to those enterprises. The affected industries include agriculture, hardware and building materials, light industry, medical products, new materials, special chemical engineering, and textiles,  The United States also claims that China provides other export-contingent subsidies to other farmers, manufacturers and producers.

Export subsidies are specifically prohibited (so-called "red light") subsidies under Article 3 of the WTO Subsidies Agreement.

The request for consultations initiates the formal dispute resolution process at the WTO.  If the parties cannot negotiate a mutually satisfactory resolution of the matter within sixty days, the United States will have the right to request the establishment of a dispute resolution panel.

The dispute is assigned case no. WT/DS489/1.  More information may be found on the WTO website.

(cgb)

February 12, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

ABA Traveling Exhibit Explains the Magna Carta

Magna Bellows 2The American Bar Association Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress, in cooperation with several other ABA entities, has created a magnificent traveling exhibit on Magna Carta, that most powerful document signed by King John in Runnymeade 800 years ago in 1215. 

The Magna Carta has been identified as the source of many fundamental freedoms and principles, including:

  • the right to a jury trial,
  • the right to speedy trial,
  • freedom from unlawful imprisonment,
  • protection from unlawful seizures of property,
  • the principle of no taxation without representation, and
  • the rule of law that even kings cannot ignore. 

The traveling exhibit is great and you will have many opportunities to see it around the country.  Looking at the exhibit here is former ABA President Laurel Bellows, who viewed the exhibit at the ABA Midyear Meeting in Houston.

(mew)

 

February 11, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, February 8, 2015

Outreach Program on the Global Legal Research Center and Other Treasures of the Law Library of Congress

Barbara Bavis LLOCEstablished in 1832 as a separate department of the Library of Congress, the Law Library of Congress is the largest law library in the world with more than 2.84 million volumes and a global legal research center staffed by foreign law experts who help provide reference assistance by phone, in person, or through the library's oh-so-fantastic "Ask a Librarian" service.

The Law Library of Congress does outreach programs on its collections and how to use them in Washington D.C. and through its website.  The latest presentation was made in Houston at the midyear meeting of the American Bar Association. Senior Legal Reference Specialist Barbara Bavis gave the informative and authoritative presentation on the latest developments, including the Global Legal Research Center, the "Guide to Law Online," the In Custodia Legis Blog, and the new website for Congressional materials Congress.gov which replaced Thomas.

I'm pictured here with Ms. Bavis. I have the honor of serving on the Advisory Commission to the American Bar Association Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress. I get to learn about many of the things happening at the Law Library of Congress as well as its outreach efforts, including the latest traveling exhibits to commemorate the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta.  The Law Library of Congress is a national treasure to be discovered and appreciated.

(mew)

February 8, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

New President and Vice President of ICJ Elected

ICJOn Friday, the members of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) elected Judge Ronny Abraham of France President of the Court and Judge Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf of Somalia Vice President. For more information, see this press release.  The judges' biographies may be found on the ICJ website.

(cgb)

February 8, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, February 7, 2015

Free Webinar from the Office of the Legal Adviser of the U.S. Department of State

The American Bar Association Section of International Law will present the fifth annual "Live from L" program, a unique opportunity for international lawyers and students of international law to hear directly from the Office of the Legal Adviser of the U.S. Department of State.  The program will be held on Thursday, February 12th, 2015 from 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM US Eastern Standard Time.

The focus of the program will be on "The Role of the Law in the Fight Against ISIL: Use of Force, Sanctions, and Foreign Terrorist Fighters"

The webcast with the Office of the Legal Adviser will be held at the Jacob Burns Moot Courtroom of the George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C.  The event with the ABA Section of Internaitonal Law is also cosponsored by the American Society of International Law, the George Washington University Law School, and the Women's Bar Assoication of the District of Columbia

Speakers:

  • Mary E. McLeod, Acting Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State
  • Joshua L. Dorosin, Assistant Legal Adviser, Office of Political-Military Affairs
  • David M. DeBartolo, Attorney Adviser, Office of United Nations Affairs
  • Michael J. Gilles, Attorney Adviser, Office of Economic and Business Affairs
  • Samuel W. McDonald, Attorney Adviser, Office of Law Enforcement and Intelligence

Moderator:

  • Susan L. Karamanian, Associate Dean for International and Comparative Legal Studies, George Washington University Law School 

You can attend the program in person (free!) at George Washington University Law School or from anywhere by webcast (free!) or by teleconference ($15.00). Click here for registration information.

(mew)

February 7, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

ICJ Denies Claims of Genocide in Croatia v. Serbia

ICJYesterday, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) issued its decision in Application of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Croatia v. Serbia), in which it denied both Croatia's claim and Serbia's counterclaim of genocide committed by the other.

The dispute arose out of armed conflict that broke out between Croatian forces and Serbian forces following Croatia's declaration of independence in 1991. From 1991-1995, Serbian forces controlled approximately one-third of what is now Croatian territory.  It was during this time that Croatia alleges Serbia committed genocide against the Croatian people.  In 1995, Croatian forces conducted a series of military operations during which they re-took this territory. It is during this time that Serbia alleges Croatian forces engaged in genocidal acts against Serbians. 

The Court first determined that it has jurisdiction under Article IX of the Genocide Convention. It also reiterated its conclusion from its 2008 judgment that Croatia and Serbia are both parties to the Genocide Convention as successors to the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

Turning to the merits, the Court held that there is sufficient evidence that Serbia committed physical acts falling within the definition of genocide in Article II of the Convention, i.e., killing members of a group; causing serious bodily and mental harm to members of a group; deliberating inflicting on the group conditions of life intended to bring about its physical destruction in whole or part; and imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group. However, the Court held that the evidence of the mental element, intent to destroy a group in whole or part, was lacking. As a result, the Court rejected Croatia's claim by a vote of 15-2. 

Likewise, the Court held that Croatian forces had also committed physical acts falling within the definition of genocide in Article II of the Convention, i.e., killing members of a group and causing serious bodily and mental harm to members of a group.  However, once again, the Court held that the intent requirement was lacking. As a result, the Court unanimously rejected Serbia's counterclaim. 

This judgment tends to show how difficult it is to prove the necessary elements of a crime, particularly the intent requirement, under international law.

For more information, visit the ICJ website.

(cgb)

February 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Colombia Signs Framework Cooperation Agreement with Inter-American Court of Human Rights

Yesterday, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights received the Ombudsman from Colombia, Jorge Armando Otalora Gomez, who visited the Court to sign a framework cooperation agreement between Colombia and the Inter-American Court.  The Colombian Ombudsman said that actions have recently been taken to strengthen the Ombudsman's office with a view towards improving the observance of human rights in Colombia.  For his part, the President of the Court, Juez Umberto Antonio Sierra Porto, stressed the importance of the Ombudman's office for promoting, protecting and defending human rights in the Americas.  He further stated that this type of agreement symbolizes the creation of a dialogue between national and international institutions regarding their joint work in protecting and promoting human rights.

For more information, see this p IACHRress release (only in Spanish).

(cgb)

February 3, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, February 2, 2015

Call for Presenters: Global Legal Skills Conference

The Global Legal Skills conference, in its 10th year, will be held in Chicago, the city of its origin. The Conference began in Chicago at The John Marshall Law School, where it was held three times. It has also traveled to Mexico (twice), to Costa Rica (twice), to Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., and most recently to the University of Verona Faculty of Law in Verona, Italy.

This year’s conference (GLS 10) will be held at The John Marshall Law School for the first two days and will be hosted at Northwestern University School of Law for its final day. The two schools are within walking distance and are also served by subway line.  The conference is also co-sponsored this year by the Facultad Libre de Derecho de Monterrey.

This message invites proposals for presentations. Proposals should be for a 25-minute presentation (for one or two people) or an interactive group panel presentation (no more than four panelists) of 75-minutes (including audience participation).

The conference audience will include legal writing professionals, international and comparative law professors, clinical professors and others involved in skills education, law school administrators, law librarians, and ESL/EFL professors and scholars. Also attending will be faculty members teaching general law subjects with a transnational or international component. Attendees have also included judges, lawyers, court translators, and others involved in international and transnational law. Attendees come from around the world, and as many as 35 countries have been represented in past conferences.

Please submit a proposal on any aspect of Global Legal Skills, including experiential learning, distance education, comparative law, international law, course design and materials, teaching methods, and opportunities for teaching abroad and in the United States. However, because the conference focuses on legal skills for a global audience, please tailor your proposal accordingly.

The schedule for GLS 10 will allow for professional networking opportunities and development and also a chance to take in the many sites (and excellent restaurants!) Chicago has to offer. Chicago is served by two airports, O’Hare and Midway, making travel to the city easy. The timing of the conference (the week before Memorial Day weekend) is intended to allow you to spend extra time exploring Chicago and its environs at a time when the temperatures are moderate and the skies are clear.

This is a self-funded academic conference, and as in past years, presenters will be asked to pay the registration fee of $225.00. A small number of need-based scholarships will also be available, especially for participants from outside the United States. Additional tickets for family members and friends will also be available for the walking tour, law school reception, and Union League Club Gala Dinner. Chicago in the springtime is a great travel destination for families where they can enjoy Millennium Park, two world class zoos, and the amazing Museum Campus.

You may submit more than one proposal but because of high demand for speaking slots you will only be allowed to speak on one panel.

Please send program proposals to GLS10Chicago@gmail.com. You can also send a copy to Lurene Contento (Program Chair of GLS 10). Her email is 9Content@jmls.edu.

Please include “GLS 10 Proposal” in the subject line. Then, list the names and institutional affiliations of presenters, the title of your presentation, a brief summary of your presentation, the format you would prefer (25 minutes or 75 minutes), and the target audience.

The first deadline for submitting a proposal is February 12, 2015. If you submit your proposal by this date, the program committee will notify presenters of acceptance no later than March 6, so that you can make appropriate travel and hotel arrangements. You will find travel information and more conference information on our website, glsc.jmls.edu/2015. Additional proposals will be accepted through April 15 if additional speaking slots are available.

Spanish Language CLE Proposals

You may also submit proposals for CLE presentations in Spanish. A Spanish-language CLE track will include sessions for attorneys, law students, and court translators. Persons submitting proposals for presentations in Spanish may also submit a proposal in English as an exception to the single presentation rule. Proposals are sought on topics such as “Introduction to Mexican Law,” “Understanding the Amparo,” and “Latin American Corporation Law.”

Scholars’ Forum (Tues. May 19, 2015)

A one-day scholars’ forum is also planned for May 19th, the day before the GLS conference begins. Participation in this forum will be limited to 16 persons and will include special sessions on international legal research as well as the presentation of papers and works-in-progress. For more information about the Scholars’ Forum, send an email to Prof. Mark E. Wojcik at mwojcik@jmls.edu with the title of your proposed work. Registration for the scholars’ forum is at this link: http://events.jmls.edu/registration/node/677

We hope to see you in Chicago this May for the 10th anniversary of the Global Legal Skills Conference!

Thank you,

Prof. Mark E. Wojcik, Chair, Global Legal Skills Conference
Prof. Lurene Contento, Chair GLS 10 Program Committee, The John Marshall Law School

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