Thursday, September 11, 2014

Anniversary of the Terrorist Attacks of 9/11/2011

9-11On this the thirteenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, we pause to remember all those who lost their lives and their friends and families.  Our thoughts and prayers also go out to the members of the armed forces who continue to fight terrorism in the Middle East and elsewhere, as well as the innocent civilians who have been injured ot killed or who live in a state of fear of extremist terrorist groups.  As international lawyers, we must work with the rest of the international community to find ways to resolve disputes peacefully and to promote respect for and protection of human rights everywhere.

(cgb)

September 11, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Reminder: Call for Papers on International Human Rights Law -- Deadline is September 15

CALL FOR PAPERS

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS -- NEW VOICES PANEL
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS (AALS)

January 2-5, 2015, Washington, D.C.

The AALS Section on International Human Rights has issued a call for papers for its "New Voices in Human Rights" program during the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The program will be called Global Perspectives on Human Rights. It will take place during the AALS Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for January 2-5, 2015. The section anticipates selecting three or four new voices from this call for papers to present their work during the Section’s program.

The focus on Global Perspectives on Human Rights will explore how human rights discourses, practices, and institutions have taken root (or not) in various terrains. While we are not categorically excluding papers that discuss human rights in the United States, we are interested in how human rights are experienced in other parts of the world, particularly areas that have not traditionally been a focus of international human rights research by scholars in the United States.

Deadline and Submission

The deadline to submit a paper is September 15, 2014. Please email submissions in Word or PDF format to Professor Stuart Ford of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago (sford@jmls.edu) and Professor Jonathan Todres of Georgia State University (jtodres@gsu.edu). In selecting proposals, priority will be given to new voices in international human rights (i.e., individuals who have not previously presented a paper at AALS on the topic of international human rights). Presentations at various stages of completion will be considered. Decisions will be made in late September.

Publication

Papers may have already been accepted for publication but must not have been published before the Annual Meeting. The section has no plans to publish the selected papers, and individual presenters should continue to seek their own publishers.

Eligibility

This call for papers is open only to full-time faculty at an AALS member school. Presenters will be expected to cover their own costs in attending the AALS annual meeting.

For any questions or inquiries please contact Professor Stuart Ford at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago at sford@jmls.edu.

(mew)

 

September 11, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

Several new bills have been introduced in the United States Congress to authorize force against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.  Here are the bills:

  • HJ Res 123 (Issa, R-CA), to authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL); to Foreign Affairs. CR 9/8/14, H7296.
  • SJ Res 42 (Nelson, D-FL), to authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against ISIL; to Foreign Relations. CR 9/8/14, S5374.
  • SJ Res 43 (Inhofe, R-OK), to authorize the use of force against the organization called the Islamic State in order to defend the American people and assist the Iraqi government in expelling the Islamic State from their territory; to Foreign Relations. CR 9/8/14, S5374.
  • H Res 718 (Schweikert, R-AZ), calling on the Department of Defense to expedite the delivery of all necessary military equipment, weapons, ammunition and other needed materials to the Kurdish Peshmerga forces to successfully combat and defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS); to Foreign Affairs. CR 9/9/14, H7388.

 

The U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee will hold a hearing on Iraq, Syria, and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). 9/16/14, 9:30 am, 216 Hart Building, Washington, D.C.

 

Hat tip to the ABA Governmental Affairs Office

(mew)

September 10, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, September 8, 2014

Reminder: Call for Papers on International Human Rights Law

CALL FOR PAPERS

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS -- NEW VOICES PANEL
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS (AALS)

January 2-5, 2015, Washington, D.C.

The AALS Section on International Human Rights has issued a call for papers for its "New Voices in Human Rights" program during the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The program will be called Global Perspectives on Human Rights. It will take place during the AALS Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for January 2-5, 2015. The section anticipates selecting three or four new voices from this call for papers to present their work during the Section’s program.

The focus on Global Perspectives on Human Rights will explore how human rights discourses, practices, and institutions have taken root (or not) in various terrains. While we are not categorically excluding papers that discuss human rights in the United States, we are interested in how human rights are experienced in other parts of the world, particularly areas that have not traditionally been a focus of international human rights research by scholars in the United States.

Deadline and Submission

The deadline to submit a paper is September 15, 2014. Please email submissions in Word or PDF format to Professor Stuart Ford of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago (sford@jmls.edu) and Professor Jonathan Todres of Georgia State University (jtodres@gsu.edu). In selecting proposals, priority will be given to new voices in international human rights (i.e., individuals who have not previously presented a paper at AALS on the topic of international human rights). Presentations at various stages of completion will be considered. Decisions will be made in late September.

Publication

Papers may have already been accepted for publication but must not have been published before the Annual Meeting. The section has no plans to publish the selected papers, and individual presenters should continue to seek their own publishers.

Eligibility

This call for papers is open only to full-time faculty at an AALS member school. Presenters will be expected to cover their own costs in attending the AALS annual meeting.

For any questions or inquiries please contact Professor Stuart Ford at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago at sford@jmls.edu.

(mew)

 

September 8, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Deadline Approaching for AALS International Law Section Call for Papers

The Section on International Law of the American Association of Law Schools (AALS) is seeking papers for its program at the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. on Sunday, January 4 at 10:30 am.

The topic of the program and call for papers is “The Influence of International Law on U.S. Government Decision-Making.” This panel will explore the role that international law plays in informing the policy outcomes arrived at by U.S. government decision-makers.  To what extent is international law determinative or even influential, and to what extent does the policy area, the branch of government, or the ideological orientation of the decision-maker matter? As a more practical matter, at what stage in the decision-making process is international law taken into account and who are the most influential actors?  How can academics be most influential in that process?  The presenter chosen through this call for papers will join current or former U.S. government officials in a panel discussion.

Eligible faculty members are invited to submit manuscripts or detailed abstracts that address any of numerous issues related to the way in which international law infuses decision-making within the United States government.

Eligibility

Per AALS policy, only full-time faculty members of AALS member law schools are eligible to submit a paper to a call for papers. The following are ineligible: faculty at fee-paid law schools, international, visiting (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school) and adjunct faculty members, graduate students, and non-law school faculty.  Untenured faculty members are particularly encouraged to submit papers.

Registration fee and expenses

The selected Call for Papers participant is responsible for paying his or her AALS annual meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Form and length of submission

Eligible faculty members are invited to submit manuscripts or detailed abstracts dealing with any aspect of the foregoing topic.  Detailed abstracts should be comprehensive enough to allow the selection committee to meaningfully evaluate the aims and likely content of papers proposed.  Papers may be accepted for publication but must not be published prior to the Annual Meeting.

Deadline and submission method

Papers must be submitted electronically to: Ms. Carol Manis, Assistant to Professor Cindy Buys at Southern Illinois University School of Law. The subject of the email should read: “Submission for AALS Section on International Law.”

The initial review of the papers and abstracts will be blind, and will be conducted by members of the section’s executive committee.  In order to facilitate blind review, please identify yourself and your institutional affiliation only in the cover letter accompanying your manuscript, and not in the manuscript itself.  The submitting author is responsible for taking any steps necessary to redact self-identifying text or footnotes.  

The deadline for submission is September 12, 2014.

The author of the selected paper/abstract will be notified by September 28, 2014.

(cgb)

September 8, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 5, 2014

Graduate Programs for Non-U.S. Lawyers

Join the Association of American Law Schools Section on Graduate Programs for Non-U.S. Lawyers at its business meeting on Friday, January 2, 2015 at 6:30 p.m. That's the first night of the conference when the Registration Area opens. 

Professor George Edwards of Indiana University is the current chair. Professor Mark E. Wojcik of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago is the Chair-Elect and will become Section Chair at the end of that AALS Annual meeting. 

When you book your flight or train to DC, please plan to arrive in time to attend the 6:30 p.m. business meeting and to share your ideas on graduate legal education for international lawyers.

September 5, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Reminder: Call for Papers on International Human Rights Law

CALL FOR PAPERS

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS -- NEW VOICES PANEL
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS (AALS)

January 2-5, 2015, Washington, D.C.

The AALS Section on International Human Rights has issued a call for papers for its "New Voices in Human Rights" program during the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The program will be called Global Perspectives on Human Rights. It will take place during the AALS Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for January 2-5, 2015. The section anticipates selecting three or four new voices from this call for papers to present their work during the Section’s program.

The focus on Global Perspectives on Human Rights will explore how human rights discourses, practices, and institutions have taken root (or not) in various terrains. While we are not categorically excluding papers that discuss human rights in the United States, we are interested in how human rights are experienced in other parts of the world, particularly areas that have not traditionally been a focus of international human rights research by scholars in the United States.

Deadline and Submission

The deadline to submit a paper is September 15, 2014. Please email submissions in Word or PDF format to Professor Stuart Ford of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago (sford@jmls.edu) and Professor Jonathan Todres of Georgia State University (jtodres@gsu.edu). In selecting proposals, priority will be given to new voices in international human rights (i.e., individuals who have not previously presented a paper at AALS on the topic of international human rights). Presentations at various stages of completion will be considered. Decisions will be made in late September.

Publication

Papers may have already been accepted for publication but must not have been published before the Annual Meeting. The section has no plans to publish the selected papers, and individual presenters should continue to seek their own publishers.

Eligibility

This call for papers is open only to full-time faculty at an AALS member school. Presenters will be expected to cover their own costs in attending the AALS annual meeting.

For any questions or inquiries please contact Professor Stuart Ford at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago at sford@jmls.edu.

(mew)

 

September 3, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Somalia Institutes Proceedings against Kenya at ICJ

Last week, Somalia instituted a proceeding against Kenya at the International Court of Justice (ICJ) regarding a dispute concerning maritime delimitations in the Indian Ocean.

In its pleadings, Somalia asks the Court "to determine, on the basis of international law, the complete course of the single maritime boundary dividing all the maritime areas appertaining to Somalia and to Kenya in the Indian Ocean, including the continental shelf beyond 200 [nautical miles]". Somalia further asks the Court "to determine the precise geographical co-ordinates of the single maritime boundary in the Indian Ocean."

Somalia contends that the maritime boundary between the Parties in the territorial sea, exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and continental shelf should be established in accordance with Articles 15, 74 and 83 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), to which both Somalia and Kenya belong. Somalia explains that, accordingly, the boundary line in the territorial sea "should be a median line as specified in Article 15, since there are no special circumstances that would justify departure from such a line" and that, in the EEZ and continental shelf, the boundary "should be established according to the three-step process the Court has consistently employed in its application of Articles 74 and 83."

Somalia asserts that "Kenya’s current position on the maritime boundary is that it should be a straight line emanating from the Parties’ land boundary terminus, and extending due east along the parallel of latitude on which the land boundary terminus sits, through the full extent of the territorial sea, EEZ and continental shelf, including the continental shelf beyond 200 [nautical miles]."

In addition to invoking jurisdiction under UNCLOS, Somalia relies upon the declarations both States have filed accepting the ICJ's compulsory jurisdiction under article 36(2) of the Court's statute.

(cgb)

September 2, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

WTO DSB Adopts Appellate Body Report on China's Rare Earth Metals

On Friday, August 29, the World Trade Organization (WTO) Dispute Settlement Body (DSB) adopted the report of the Appellate Body finding that China’s export restrictions on rare earths, tungsten and molybdenum, were in breach of China’s WTO obligations and not justified under the exceptions found in Article XX of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) 1994.  For more information regarding this case, visit the WTO website.

(cgb)

September 2, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, August 31, 2014

International Law Weekend in New York

The American Branch of the International Law Association and the International Law Students Association present an annual International Law Weekend conference.  It's well attended, interesting, and a good reason to spend a weekend in New York.

This year, unfortunately, the International Law Weekend is being held during the same week as the Fall Meeting of the American Bar Association Section of International Law. It's an unfortunate conflict, but it highlights that international law is a rich field with many options for participation.

Here is a link to the call for proposals for the International Law Weekend.  It seems that although the deadline passed some time ago, there might still be an opporuntity to propose an additional panel or two. If nothing else, get this program on your radar and plan to attend ILW New York this October (unless you're in Argentina at the ABA meeting!).

(mew)

August 31, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

International Courts and Legitimacy

The University of Baltimore School of Law will host a symposium on "Legitimacy and International Courts" on September 18-19, 2014 at the Angelos Law Center in Baltimore.

Symposium participants include Professor Andrea Bjorkland (McGill), Allen Buchanan (Duke), Harlan Cohen (Georgia), Margaret de Guzman (Temple), Andreas Follesdal (Oslo), Nienke Grossman (Baltimore), Chiara Giorgetti (Richmond), Alexandra Huneeus (Wisconsin), Matthias Kumm (New York University), Molly Land (Connecticut), Joost Pauwelyn (The Graduate Institute, Geneva), Mark Pollack (Temple), Mortimer Sellers (Baltimore), Yuval Shany (Hebrew University), Anastasia Telestsky (Idaho), Geir Ulfstein (Oslo), and Erik Voeten (Georgetown).

For more information about the program, click here.

(mew)

August 31, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 29, 2014

Call for Papers: International Human Rights Law

CALL FOR PAPERS

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS -- NEW VOICES PANEL
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS (AALS)

January 2-5, 2015, Washington, D.C.

The AALS Section on International Human Rights has issued a call for papers for its "New Voices in Human Rights" program during the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The program will be called Global Perspectives on Human Rights. It will take place during the AALS Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for January 2-5, 2015. The section anticipates selecting three or four new voices from this call for papers to present their work during the Section’s program.

The focus on Global Perspectives on Human Rights will explore how human rights discourses, practices, and institutions have taken root (or not) in various terrains. While we are not categorically excluding papers that discuss human rights in the United States, we are interested in how human rights are experienced in other parts of the world, particularly areas that have not traditionally been a focus of international human rights research by scholars in the United States.

Deadline and Submission

The deadline to submit a paper is September 15, 2014. Please email submissions in Word or PDF format to Professor Stuart Ford of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago (sford@jmls.edu) and Professor Jonathan Todres of Georgia State University (jtodres@gsu.edu). In selecting proposals, priority will be given to new voices in international human rights (i.e., individuals who have not previously presented a paper at AALS on the topic of international human rights). Presentations at various stages of completion will be considered. Decisions will be made in late September.

Publication

Papers may have already been accepted for publication but must not have been published before the Annual Meeting. The section has no plans to publish the selected papers, and individual presenters should continue to seek their own publishers.

Eligibility

This call for papers is open only to full-time faculty at an AALS member school. Presenters will be expected to cover their own costs in attending the AALS annual meeting.

For any questions or inquiries please contact Professor Stuart Ford at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago at sford@jmls.edu.

(mew)

 

August 29, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Libel Tourism Lecture at the University of Denver

Nanda-Marling-WojcikProfessor Mark E. Wojcik of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago was the guest speaker at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law on August 26, 2014. His lecture was on the "International Law and Libel Tourism: Where Can You Be Sued for What You Say on the Internet?" and was sponsored by the Ved Nanda Center for International and Comparative Law.

The premise of the lecture was that anything you publish on the Internet (including a blog post like this) can be viewed almost anywhere in the world. Whether that post is actionable as defamation depends not on where it was written but on where it was viewed or "published." This creates opportunties for "libel tourism," where plaintiffs alleging defamation can sue almost anywhere in the world for defamation on the internet. This implicates many private international law issues for authors, publishers, and those seeking to protect their personal or business reputations around the world. 

Pictured here are Professor Ved Nanda of the Unviersity of Denver, Julie Marling (President of the International Law Society at the University of Denver, and Professor Mark Wojcik.

August 29, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

New Article on the New Chinese Trademark Law

The Law Journal of the International Trademark Association has just published a useful article on the new Chinese Trademark Law, which entered into effect in May 2014.  The article is by Paul Kossof and is based the book that he wrote on the subject, published earlier this year by Carolina Academic Press.

(mew)

August 27, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Thailand: Threatened Use of Lèse Majesté Laws Chills Freedom of Expression

Ravina Shamsadani UNHCHRThe United Nations rights office has expressed serious concern over the prosecution and harsh sentencing of individuals in Thailand under the country’s so called lèse majesté law and its “chilling effects” on freedom of expression. In Geneva, Ravina Shamdasani, spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) (pictured at right), said that since the 22 May coup, at least 13 new lèse majesté cases have been opened for investigation while others where charges had previously not been laid, have been revived.

“Such measures are adding to the larger pattern of increasing restrictions on freedom of expression in Thailand,” she warned, adding that just last week, two university students were arrested for participating in a play in October 2013 that depicted a fictional monarch who was manipulated by his advisor.

The arrests followed a number of convictions and harsh sentences in lèse majesté cases, including that of Plutnarin Thanaboriboonsuk, who was also charged under the Computer Crime Act in relation to messages he posted on Facebook. He was sentenced on 31 July to 15 years in prison. That sentence came less than two months after charges were laid on 16 June, even though the investigation had remained pending for more than two years.

In another case, on 14 August, Yuthasak Kangwanwongsakul, a taxi driver, was sentenced to two years and six months in jail under the lèse majesté laws for a conversation he had with a passenger.

“We are concerned that more charges may be filed and that more harsh sentences may be issued in the coming weeks,” said Shamdasani.

In 2013, High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay indicated her support for amendments of Thailand’s lèse majesté law under its section 112 of the Criminal Code to address concerns related to the implementation of the law.

In 2011, the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of expression and opinion also urged the amendment, stating that section 112 was too vague and prescribes long maximum sentences that are contrary to permissible restrictions on freedom of expression under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), which Thailand has ratified.

“We reiterate our call to the military administration to ensure its compliance with Thailand’s obligations under international human rights law, especially the ICCPR,” Shamdasani said.

“The threat of the use of the lèse majesté laws adds to the chilling effects on freedom of expression observed in Thailand after the coup, and risks curbing critical debate on issues of public interest.”

(adapted from a UN press release)

August 26, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Women's Equality Day 2014

RosieToday, August 26, is Women's Equality Day in the United States.  It marks the anniversary of the passage in 1920 of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution giving women the right to vote.  It is a day to celebrate women's achievements and to focus on issues of gender equality. For more information regarding the history of this day, click here.

Although women have made great strides in achieving equality here in the U.S., as President Barak Obama has stated, "there is still more work to do."  Women still make less money than men and face barriers and discrimination in areas such as health care, education and employment.  Internationally, we also see the rise of a fundamentalist interpretation of Islam and other practices that deny equality and basic human rights to women, in contradiction to the United Nations Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and the Convention for the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), as well as many other human rights treaties.

If you are interested in thes issues, what can you do to commemorate the day?  Urge the United States government to ratify CEDAW, pass an Equal Rights Amendment, and support projects to empower women in development countries.

(cgb)

 

August 26, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Lithuanian Television Broadcasters Refuse to Air This Advertisement

We've learned from the blog for the Human Rights Campaign that television broadcasters in Lithuania have refused to air a video clip that shows lesbian and gay couples and families. The video was produced by the national LGBT rights organization LGL and was meant to be a positive representation of the LGBT community, as a part of their larger campaign called "Change It." 

The video itself has nothing provocative in it, but commercial broadcasters fear that it may violate Lithuania's Law on the Protection of Minors Against the Detrimental Effect of Public Information.  This law forbids information that "expresses contempt for family values, encourages the concept of entry into a marriage and creation of a family other than stipulated in the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania and the Civil Code of the Republic of Lithuania.”

Here is the video. Read more about this on the HRC Blog by clicking here.

 

h/t rw

(mew)

August 23, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Weekend Fun - Dancing around the World

Watch this tremendously fun video to see Matt Harding dance his way around the world.

 

(cgb)

August 23, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 22, 2014

Call for Papers: Emerging Issues in Polar Energy Law and Governance

The Oil, Gas, and Energy Law Journal invites submissions for a Special Issue on "Emerging issues in Polar Energy Law and Governance".  Here is an excerpt from the Call for Papers:

"The Polar areas provide special challenges, opportunities and restrictions regarding the development of energy resources, particularly oil and gas. The potential for enormous untapped energy reserves and the international law challenges of maritime boundaries borders and competing claims of sovereignty will make the Arctic region home to one of the most compelling sets of international legal issues in the 21st Century. The renegotiation of the Madrid Protocol in the Antarctic, which currently prevents mining in the Antarctic regions, combined with similar issues of competing claims of sovereignty, and the overarching Antarctic Treaty Framework means that potential energy resource development Antarctic region will become increasingly controversial and prominent.

OGEL encourages submission of relevant papers, studies, and comments on various aspects of this subject. The focus of this Special Polar Issue is the search for and exploitation of energy resources in the polar regions. In particular it seeks to focus on current and emerging legal frameworks within which energy resources will be developed. However, this special edition also seeks submissions of papers and studies addressing the wider topic of the international legal framework for the polar regions.

The guest editor for this special issue is Dr Tina Hunter (Director of the Centre for International Minerals and Energy Law Centre at the University of Queensland, Australia, and an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland.

A one-page proposal should be submitted by 15 November 2014. Acceptance will be communicated by 1 December 2015. Papers should be submitted by 15 March 2015 deadline to Dr Tina Hunter.

(cgb)

August 22, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

ABA Section of International Law Committee Awards

The American Bar Association Section of International Law announced the recipients of its various committee awards. Congratulations to all. Get the ful list of award recipients by clicking here.

(mew)

August 20, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)