Thursday, January 21, 2016

International Law Weekend West

Here's a reminder that the American Branch of the International Law Association will hold its International Law Weekend-West on January 29, 2016, at Brigham Young University Law School in Provo, Utah.  The theme for the conference is "International Law in a Divided World."  As reflected in the program below, panels, roundtable discussions, and keynotes will address issues such as income inequality, international arbitration, corruption, the European migration crisis and more.  To register, click here.
 
Conference participants should plan to fly into Salt Lake City International Airport and take a shuttle, taxi, or rental car to Provo (approximately 45 miles south of the Salt Lake Airport).   Participants may reserve a room at the Provo Marriott at the conference rate of $104 per night.  Reservations must be made by January 7, 2016.  To reserve your room, click on the following link: Book your group rate for Brigham Young University International Law Weekend-West.
 
Those wishing to enjoy Utah beyond the day of the conference may consider skiing options or the Sundance Film Festival, which closes January 31, 2016.  
 
For logistical questions about International Law Weekend-West, please contact BYU Law School Events Planner Lauren Wignall at wignalll@law.byu.edu.  For program questions, please contact the conference organizer, BYU Law Professor David Moore, at moored@law.byu.edu.


"International Law in a Divided World"
International Law Weekend - West
International Law Association, American Branch
Brigham Young University Law School
January 29, 2016
 
8:30 am - 8:50 am Welcome and Opening Remarks
  •  David Moore, Brigham Young University Law School
  •  David P. Stewart, Georgetown University Law Center; President, International Law Association - American Branch
                       
9:00 am - 10:30 am Panels
 
Disasters and International Law - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Maxine Burkett, University of Hawaii School of Law (via video conference)
  • Cinnamon Carlarne, Ohio State University Law School
  • Hari Osofsky, University of Minnesota Law School
  • Karen Bradshaw Shulz, Arizona State University College of Law
  • Lisa Grow Sun, Brigham Young University Law School
 
The Middle East and the Islamic State - 1.5 hours Utah CLE 9 (requested)
  • Frederick Axelgard, Brigham Young University Wheatley Institution
  • Sahar F. Aziz, Texas A&M University School of Law (invited)
  • Christopher Jenks, Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law
  • Rachel VanLandingham, Southwestern Law School
 
Private International Law Practice - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Stirling Adams, Novell
  • Curtis Anderson, Brigham Young University Law School
  • Jacob Briem, LANDESK Software
  • Loren Hulse, Stoel Rives
  • Gayla Sorenson, Brigham Young University Law School
10:45 am - 12:15 pm Panels
 
International Business Trends - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Lew Cramer, Coldwell Banker Commercial Associates
  • Richard Hartvigsen, NuSkin Enterprises
  • Kirk Jowers, dōTERRA
  • Derek Miller, World Trade Center Utah
  • Craig Parry, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless
  • David Rudd, Ballard Spahr
Presidential Power to Implement Treaties - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Kif Augustine-Adams, Brigham Young University Law School
  • David Moore, Brigham Young University Law School
  • Mike Ramsey, University of San Diego Law School
  • David Sloss, Santa Clara Law School
  • Michael Van Alstine, University of Maryland School of Law
 
Public International Law Practice - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Nikki Eberhardt, Progress Through Business, Inc.
  • Janet Eberle, U.S. Air Force, Judge Advocate General Corps
  • Trent Pedersen, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • David Stewart, Georgetown University Law Center
 
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Lunch and Keynote Address
 
International Norm Diffusion- 1 hour Utah CLE (requested)
  • Katerina Linos, Berkeley Law School
 
2:15 pm - 3:45 pm Panels
 
Selective Enforcement of International Criminal Law - 1.5 hours Utah CLE
(requested)
  • Charles Jalloh, Florida International University College of Law
  • Leila Sadat, Washington University, St. Louis School of Law
 
Issues in International Anti-Corruption Law- 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Miriam Baer, Brooklyn Law School
  • Tom Lee, Fordham University School of Law
  • Philip Nichols, The Wharton School
  • Andy Spalding, University of Richmond School of Law
 
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm Roundtables
 
The European Migration Crisis - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Carolina Núñez, Brigham Young University Law School
  • Moria Paz, Stanford Law School
 
Contemporary International Arbitration - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Charles "Chip" Brower, Wayne State University Law School
  • Victoria Sahani, Washington & Lee University School of Law
 
Cyber Security- 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  •  Eric Jensen, Brigham Young University Law School
  •  John McClurg, Dell
 
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Dinner and Keynote Address
 
Income Inequality and International Law- 1 hour Utah CLE (requested)
  • Chantal Thomas, Cornell Law School

(mew)

January 21, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 18, 2016

WTO Appellate Report in EU-China Antidumping Case

WTOThe Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization has issued its compliance report in the dispute “European Communities — Definitive Anti-Dumping Measures on Certain Iron or Steel Fasteners from China — Recourse to Article 21.5 of the DSU by China” (DS397).  Click here for a one-page summary of the key findings.

(mew)

January 18, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

EU Files Trade Dispute Against Columbia Over Alcoholic Beverages

Earlier, today, the European Union (EU) requested consultations with Columbia at the World Trade Organization (WTO), the first step in the WTO dispute resolution process. The EU alleges that Columbian measures accord discriminatory treatment to imported alcoholic beverages, negatively affecting exports of spirits from the EU to Columbia in violation of WTO rules.  If the parties have not resolved the matter within 60 days of the request for consultations, the EU may request the establishment of  a dispute resolution panel.  The matter has been assigned WT/DS502/1.

For more information, visit the WTO website.

(cgb)

January 13, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Call for Papers: Utrecht Journal of International and European Law

The Utrecht Journal of International and European Law is issuing a Call for Papers to be published in its 83rd edition in summer 2016 on ‘General Issues’ within International and European law.

The Board of Editors invites submissions addressing any aspect of International and European law; topics may include, but are not limited to, European Union law, International and European Human Rights Law, International and European Criminal Law, Transnational Justice, Family Law, Health and Medical Law, Children’s Rights, Commercial Law, Media Law, Law of Democracy, Taxation, Comparative Law, Competition Law, Employment Law, Law of the Sea, Environmental Law, Indigenous Peoples, Land and Resources Law, Alternative Dispute Resolution, or any other relevant topic.

Authors are invited to address questions and issues arising from the specific area of law relating to their topic. All types of manuscripts, from socio-legal to legal technical to comparative, will be considered for publication. However, any analysis solely limited to a national legal system will fall outside the scope of the Journal. An international or European legal dimension is imperative.

The Board of Editors will select articles based on quality of research and writing, diversity and relevance of topic. The novelty of the academic contribution is also an essential requirement. Prospective articles should be submitted online and should conform to the journal style guide on the journal's website. Utrecht Journal has a word limit of 15,000 words including footnotes.

Deadline for Submissions: 18 April 2016

Utrecht Journal of International and European Law is the student-led, peer-reviewed biannual law journal of Urios, the Utrecht Association for International and European Law. The Journal was originally founded in 1981 as Merkourios. Since 1981, the Journal has expanded its readership and is now distributed all over the world through databases such as HeinOnline and the Directory of Open Access Journals.

(cgb)

January 7, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 4, 2016

International Law Weekend West

The American Branch of the International Law Association will hold its International Law Weekend-West on January 29, 2016, at Brigham Young University Law School in Provo, Utah.  The theme for the conference is "International Law in a Divided World."  As reflected in the program below, panels, roundtable discussions, and keynotes will address issues such as income inequality, international arbitration, corruption, the European migration crisis and more.  To register, click here.
 
Conference participants should plan to fly into Salt Lake City International Airport and take a shuttle, taxi, or rental car to Provo (approximately 45 miles south of the Salt Lake Airport).   Participants may reserve a room at the Provo Marriott at the conference rate of $104 per night.  Reservations must be made by January 7, 2016.  To reserve your room, click on the following link: Book your group rate for Brigham Young University International Law Weekend-West.
 
Those wishing to enjoy Utah beyond the day of the conference may consider skiing options or the Sundance Film Festival, which closes January 31, 2016.  
 
For logistical questions about International Law Weekend-West, please contact BYU Law School Events Planner Lauren Wignall at wignalll@law.byu.edu.  For program questions, please contact the conference organizer, BYU Law Professor David Moore, at moored@law.byu.edu.


"International Law in a Divided World"
International Law Weekend - West
International Law Association, American Branch
Brigham Young University Law School
January 29, 2016
 
8:30 am - 8:50 am Welcome and Opening Remarks
  •  David Moore, Brigham Young University Law School
  •  David P. Stewart, Georgetown University Law Center; President, International Law Association - American Branch
                       
9:00 am - 10:30 am Panels
 
Disasters and International Law - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Maxine Burkett, University of Hawaii School of Law (via video conference)
  • Cinnamon Carlarne, Ohio State University Law School
  • Hari Osofsky, University of Minnesota Law School
  • Karen Bradshaw Shulz, Arizona State University College of Law
  • Lisa Grow Sun, Brigham Young University Law School
 
The Middle East and the Islamic State - 1.5 hours Utah CLE 9 (requested)
  • Frederick Axelgard, Brigham Young University Wheatley Institution
  • Sahar F. Aziz, Texas A&M University School of Law (invited)
  • Christopher Jenks, Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law
  • Rachel VanLandingham, Southwestern Law School
 
Private International Law Practice - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Stirling Adams, Novell
  • Curtis Anderson, Brigham Young University Law School
  • Jacob Briem, LANDESK Software
  • Loren Hulse, Stoel Rives
  • Gayla Sorenson, Brigham Young University Law School
10:45 am - 12:15 pm Panels
 
International Business Trends - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Lew Cramer, Coldwell Banker Commercial Associates
  • Richard Hartvigsen, NuSkin Enterprises
  • Kirk Jowers, dōTERRA
  • Derek Miller, World Trade Center Utah
  • Craig Parry, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless
  • David Rudd, Ballard Spahr
Presidential Power to Implement Treaties - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Kif Augustine-Adams, Brigham Young University Law School
  • David Moore, Brigham Young University Law School
  • Mike Ramsey, University of San Diego Law School
  • David Sloss, Santa Clara Law School
  • Michael Van Alstine, University of Maryland School of Law
 
Public International Law Practice - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Nikki Eberhardt, Progress Through Business, Inc.
  • Janet Eberle, U.S. Air Force, Judge Advocate General Corps
  • Trent Pedersen, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • David Stewart, Georgetown University Law Center
 
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Lunch and Keynote Address
 
International Norm Diffusion- 1 hour Utah CLE (requested)
  • Katerina Linos, Berkeley Law School
 
2:15 pm - 3:45 pm Panels
 
Selective Enforcement of International Criminal Law - 1.5 hours Utah CLE
(requested)
  • Charles Jalloh, Florida International University College of Law
  • Leila Sadat, Washington University, St. Louis School of Law
 
Issues in International Anti-Corruption Law- 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Miriam Baer, Brooklyn Law School
  • Tom Lee, Fordham University School of Law
  • Philip Nichols, The Wharton School
  • Andy Spalding, University of Richmond School of Law
 
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm Roundtables
 
The European Migration Crisis - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Carolina Núñez, Brigham Young University Law School
  • Moria Paz, Stanford Law School
 
Contemporary International Arbitration - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Charles "Chip" Brower, Wayne State University Law School
  • Victoria Sahani, Washington & Lee University School of Law
 
Cyber Security- 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  •  Eric Jensen, Brigham Young University Law School
  •  John McClurg, Dell
 
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Dinner and Keynote Address
 
Income Inequality and International Law- 1 hour Utah CLE (requested)
  • Chantal Thomas, Cornell Law School

(mew)

January 4, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 1, 2016

Legal Research and Writing Classes for Non-U.S. Lawyers

Here's another entry for your Dance Card at the upcoming annual meeting of the Association of American Law Schools, sponsored by the AALS Section on Graduate Programs for Non-U.S. Lawyers:

Saturday, January 9, 2016, 3:30 to 5:15 p.m.

New Law Teacher Program – Pedagogy:

Legal Research and Writing Classes for Non-U.S. Lawyers

This program will review legal research and writing assignments, materials, and teaching needs for non-U.S. lawyers attending LL.M. programs in the United States. The program will also consider how professors and law schools can better serve the needs of international students.

Moderators: Lauren Fielder (University of Texas School of Law)

Speakers:

Hether Clash Macfarlane (Pacific McGeorge School of Law)

January 1, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 31, 2015

Live from "L"

"L" is the nickname for the Legal Adviser for the U.S. Department of State. Several years ago, the American Bar Association Section of International Law started a program called "Live from L" in which the Legal Adviser would discuss current international law issues. The program will next be held on Thursday, February 18, 2016, at the George Washington University School of Law. It will be co-sponsored by the American Society of International Law. You can attend the program in person or listen in online. The focus will be on the Iran Nuclear Deal, but of course events in February may bring additional topics for discussion or to be raised in the question and answer segment. The program will also be webcast, making it widely available to all of you.

(mew)

December 31, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda To Close Its Doors December 31, 2015

The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), created in the wake of the genocide that took place in Rwanda in 1994,  has rendered its last judgment and will officially close its doors on New Year's Eve 2015.

On December 14, the ICTR  delivered its final judgment on appeal in the case against former Minister of Family and Women’s Development Pauline Nyiramasuhuko and five co-accused. Nyiramasuhuko was the first woman convicted of genocide by an international court. The court found her guilty of rape and other crimes. The Appeals Chamber upheld the convictions for most of the charges, but lowered the prison sentences for all six defendants.

In another significant development in December, Congolese officials arrested Ladislas Ntaganzwa, the former mayor of Nyakizu, Rwanda, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The ICTR had indicted Ntaganzwa for genocide, incitement to commit genocide, and crimes against humanity, and transferred his case to Rwanda in 2012 for trial. He is currently detained in the Congolese capital, Kinshasa.

The United Nations Security Council established the ICTR in 1994 to prosecute persons responsible for genocide and other serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in Rwanda or by Rwandan citizens in neighboring countries between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 1994. It was expected to try mostly high-level suspects and those who played a leading role in the genocide.

Among the ICTR's successes are the trial and conviction of several prominent figures, including former Prime Minister Jean Kambanda; the former army chief of staff, General Augustin Bizimungu; and the former Defense Ministry chief of staff, Colonel Théoneste Bagosora. During its 20 years in existence, the ICTR indicted 93 people, sentenced 61, and acquitted 14, helping to establish the truth relating to the Rwandan genocide and providing justice to victims. The ICTR also established important precedents in international criminal law and served as a model for  the creation of the International Criminal Court under the 1998 Rome Statute.

Despite these successes, the ICTR has also been criticized for the lack of reparations for victims,  its location outside Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania, its handling of a relatively small number of cases, its high operating costs, and its lengthy trials.  It also has been criticized for its unwillingness to prosecute war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in 1994 by the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF), the rebel group that ended the genocide and has been Rwanda’s ruling party ever since. 

Prosecutions of perpetrators of war crimes and crimes against humanity in Rwanda will continue through the Rwandan justice system and in the domestic courts of several other countries, including Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, Canada, Finland, Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, and France. The ICTR also is handing over three other cases to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals. 

A top priority continues to be the arrest, transfer, and prosecution of eight remaining fugitives, five of whom are to be tried by Rwanda and three by the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals: former Defense Minister Augustin Bizimana, the former commander of the Presidential Guard Protais Mpiranya, and Félicien Kabuga, a businessman. The execution of international arrest warrants has posed a major problem in international criminal law. Neither the ICTR nor the residual mechanism have their own police to carry out arrests and depend entirely on the cooperation of states where suspects are living. Rwanda's Minister of Justice has called upon the international community to assist in bringing those suspects to justice to finish the work carried out by the ICTR.

(cgb) 

December 30, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, December 27, 2015

Congratulations to David Gerber, New President of the American Society of Comparative Law

David GerberProfessor David Gerber of the Chicago-Kent College of Law has been elected President of the American Society of Comparative Law. Founded in 1851, the American Society of Comparative Law promotes the comparative study of law. As its new President, Professor Gerber plans to focus outreach activities in Latin America and Asia.

Professor Gerber writes and teaches primarily in the areas of antitrust/competition law, comparative law, international economic law and globalization studies. He received his B.A. from Trinity College (Conn.), his M.A. from Yale, and his J.D. from the University of Chicago. In 2013 he was awarded the degree of Honorary Doctor of Laws by the University of Zurich, Switzerland.

He has been a visiting professor at the law schools of the University of Pennsylvania, Northwestern University, and Washington University in the United States as well as on the law faculties of the University of Munich and Freiburg in Germany, Stockholm and Uppsala in Sweden, and the Global Law Faculty of Catolica University in Portugal. He has been a distinguished visitor at numerous universities, including the University of Rome (Sapienza), the University of Paris II, the University of Zurich, the University of Aix-en-Provence, and Meiji University (Japan). He has also been a visiting fellow at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn, Germany. Before beginning his teaching career, Professor Gerber practiced law in New York and in Europe.

(mew)

December 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, December 26, 2015

A Beginner's Guide to Treaty Research

Have to do some treaty research? Here's some helpful tips from our good friends at the Law Library of Congress, the largest law library in the world. Click here for their helpful advice on treaty research. And even if you're already a treaty research expert, you'll love the story about how President Washington brought a treaty to the Senate for its advice and consent but was surprised when they didn't want to debate it in front of him. Have a look!

(mew)

December 26, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Registration is now open for the ABILA International Law Weekend-West

The American Branch of the International Law Association announced that International Law Weekend-West will take place January 29, 2016, at Brigham Young University Law School in Provo, Utah.  The theme for the conference is "International Law in a Divided World."  As reflected in the program below, panels, roundtable discussions, and keynotes will address issues such as income inequality, international arbitration, corruption, the European migration crisis and more.  To register, click here.
 
Conference participants should plan to fly into Salt Lake City International Airport and take a shuttle, taxi, or rental car to Provo (approximately 45 miles south of the Salt Lake Airport).   Participants may reserve a room at the Provo Marriott at the conference rate of $104 per night.  Reservations must be made by January 7, 2016.  To reserve your room, click on the following link: Book your group rate for Brigham Young University International Law Weekend-West.
 
Those wishing to enjoy Utah beyond the day of the conference may consider skiing options or the Sundance Film Festival, which closes January 31, 2016.  
 
For logistical questions about International Law Weekend-West, please contact BYU Law School Events Planner Lauren Wignall at wignalll@law.byu.edu.  For program questions, please contact the conference organizer, BYU Law Professor David Moore, at moored@law.byu.edu.


"International Law in a Divided World"
International Law Weekend - West
International Law Association, American Branch
Brigham Young University Law School
January 29, 2016
 
8:30 am - 8:50 am Welcome and Opening Remarks
  •  David Moore, Brigham Young University Law School
  •  David P. Stewart, Georgetown University Law Center; President, International Law Association - American Branch
                       
9:00 am - 10:30 am Panels
 
Disasters and International Law - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Maxine Burkett, University of Hawaii School of Law (via video conference)
  • Cinnamon Carlarne, Ohio State University Law School
  • Hari Osofsky, University of Minnesota Law School
  • Karen Bradshaw Shulz, Arizona State University College of Law
  • Lisa Grow Sun, Brigham Young University Law School
 
The Middle East and the Islamic State - 1.5 hours Utah CLE 9 (requested)
  • Frederick Axelgard, Brigham Young University Wheatley Institution
  • Sahar F. Aziz, Texas A&M University School of Law (invited)
  • Christopher Jenks, Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law
  • Rachel VanLandingham, Southwestern Law School
 
Private International Law Practice - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Stirling Adams, Novell
  • Curtis Anderson, Brigham Young University Law School
  • Jacob Briem, LANDESK Software
  • Loren Hulse, Stoel Rives
  • Gayla Sorenson, Brigham Young University Law School
 
10:45 am - 12:15 pm Panels
 
International Business Trends - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Lew Cramer, Coldwell Banker Commercial Associates
  • Richard Hartvigsen, NuSkin Enterprises
  • Kirk Jowers, dōTERRA
  • Derek Miller, World Trade Center Utah
  • Craig Parry, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless
  • David Rudd, Ballard Spahr
 
Presidential Power to Implement Treaties - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
Kif Augustine-Adams, Brigham Young University Law School
David Moore, Brigham Young University Law School
Mike Ramsey, University of San Diego Law School
David Sloss, Santa Clara Law School
Michael Van Alstine, University of Maryland School of Law
 
Public International Law Practice - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Nikki Eberhardt, Progress Through Business, Inc.
  • Janet Eberle, U.S. Air Force, Judge Advocate General Corps
  • Trent Pedersen, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • David Stewart, Georgetown University Law Center
 
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Lunch and Keynote Address
 
International Norm Diffusion- 1 hour Utah CLE (requested)
Katerina Linos, Berkeley Law School
 
2:15 pm - 3:45 pm Panels
 
Selective Enforcement of International Criminal Law - 1.5 hours Utah CLE
(requested)
  • Charles Jalloh, Florida International University College of Law
  • Leila Sadat, Washington University, St. Louis School of Law
 
Issues in International Anti-Corruption Law- 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Miriam Baer, Brooklyn Law School
  • Tom Lee, Fordham University School of Law
  • Philip Nichols, The Wharton School
  • Andy Spalding, University of Richmond School of Law
 
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm Roundtables
 
The European Migration Crisis - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Carolina Núñez, Brigham Young University Law School
  • Moria Paz, Stanford Law School
 
Contemporary International Arbitration - 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  • Charles "Chip" Brower, Wayne State University Law School
  • Victoria Sahani, Washington & Lee University School of Law
 
Cyber Security- 1.5 hours Utah CLE (requested)
  •  Eric Jensen, Brigham Young University Law School
  •  John McClurg, Dell
 
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Dinner and Keynote Address
 
Income Inequality and International Law- 1 hour Utah CLE (requested)
  • Chantal Thomas, Cornell Law School

(mew)

December 23, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 21, 2015

Live From "L"

"L" is the nickname for the Legal Adviser for the U.S. Department of State. Several years ago, the American Bar Association Section of International Law started a program called "Live from L" in which the Legal Adviser would discuss current international law issues. The program will next be held on Thursday, February 18, 2016, at the George Washington University School of Law. It will be co-sponsored by the American Society of International Law. You can attend the program in person or listen in online. The focus will be on the Iran Nuclear Deal, but of course events in February may bring additional topics for discussion or to be raised in the question and answer segment. The program will also be webcast, making it widely available to all of you.

(mew)

December 21, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Save the Dates! Upcoming AALS Annual Meetings in New York, San Francisco, San Diego, and New Orleans

AALS LogoThe Association of American Law Schools holds its well-attended annual meeting each January. Here's the schedule of upcoming meetings for the next few years:

  • January 6-10, 2016: New York
  • January 4-7, 2017: San Francisco
  • January 3-6, 2018: San Diego
  • January 2-6, 2019: New Orleans

The Association of American Law Schools is a nonprofit association of 180 law schools. Its law school members enroll most of the law students in the United States.  The AALS describes its mission as "to uphold and advance excellence in legal education." The AALS promotes the core values of excellence in teaching and scholarship, academic freedom, and diversity, including diversity of backgrounds and viewpoints, while seeking to improve the legal profession, to foster justice, and to serve local, national, and international communities.

Visit the AALS website for more information about the Association and its upcoming meetings and other activities. The AALS has a large number of Sections focused on various topics, including international law. At the 2016 Annual Meeting, the AALS Section of International Law has organized a field trip to the United Nations.

(mew)

December 21, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, December 19, 2015

Reminder of AALS Day at the United Nations

UN General AssemblyThe Association of American Law Schools Section on International Law has organized an impressive lineup of presenters for its one-day field trip to the United Nations on Thursday, January 7, 2016. The event is part of the AALS Annual Meeting and is open to all law professors attending the AALS Annual Meeting. You need not be a member of the AALS Section on International Law (although if you're a U.S. law professor reading this blog, why wouldn't you be a member of that section?).

The day-long program includes a briefing, a luncheon, a tour of the United Nations, and time to visit the U.N. bookstore and gift shop. Tickets are still available, and participants can also purchase extra tickets for interested family members.

The speakers for the program are an impressive lineup organized by Dean Claudio Grossman of the Washington College of Law at American University. The speakers are:

  • His Excellency Cristian Barros, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations, speaking on challenges facing the U.N. Security Council.
  • Andrew Gilmour (to be confirmed), Director of the Political, Peacekeeping, Humanitarian, and Human Rights Unit of the Executive Office of the Secretary-General (EOSG). Topic: “Peace, Security, and the Secretary General’s Human Rights Up Front Initiative to Prevent and Respond to Serious Human Rights Violations.”
  • Claudio Grossman (confirmed), Chair, United Nations Committee Against Torture and Dean of the American University Washington College of Law. Topic: “The Human Rights Treaty Bodies of the United Nations – Challenges for the Future”
  • Katarina Mansson (confirmed), Human Rights Treaties Division, United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Topic: “Partnering for Peace and Rights: The Evolving Relationship Between the United Nations and Regional Organizations.”
  • Craig Mokhiber (confirmed), Research and Right to Development Division, United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Topic: “Development and the Post-2015 Development Agenda.”
  • Salil Shetty (to be confirmed), Secretary-General, Amnesty International. Topic: “Amnesty International’s Efforts”
  • Moderator: Prof. Mark E. Wojcik (The John Marshall Law School--Chicago)

When you register for the AALS annual meeting, you can select the field trip as a separate option. The cost for the day-long event is $90.00, which includes the luncheon and tour. If you have already registered for the meeting, you can still add a ticket to this event to your registration.

(mew)

December 19, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

WTO Dispute Settlement News

2015 marks the 20th anniversary of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which reached another milestone this year - the receipt of its 500th trade dispute for settlement. Developed and developing countries have initiated disputes in almost equal numbers. The United States has been the most frequent complainant and respondent, with the European Communities a close second.  Most of the disputes have focused on anti-dumping and subsidy issues.

On December 8, the United States filed yet another trade dispute with the WTO Dispute Settlement Body.  This complaint alleges that China has violated WTO rules with respect tax advantages provided in the sale of domestically produced aircraft.  For more information, see WT/DS501/1.

(cgb) 

December 16, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Kidnappings for Ransom Are On the Rise in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Democratic Republic of Congo MapAt least 175 people have been kidnapped for ransom during 2015 in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Human Rights Watch said today. Former and current members of armed groups appear responsible for many of the kidnappings.

The vast majority of the cases documented by Human Rights Watch were in Rutshuru territory, North Kivu province, in the eastern part of the country. At least three hostages were killed while another was fatally shot in a kidnapping attempt. One remains missing. Nearly all hostages were released after relatives or employers paid ransom. Twenty of the victims were Congolese and international aid workers.

“The alarming increase in kidnappings is a grave threat to the people of eastern Congo,” said Ida Sawyer, senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Congolese authorities should urgently establish a special police unit to help rescue hostages and investigate and prosecute those responsible.”

Human Rights Watch interviewed 45 former hostages and witnesses in North Kivu between May and December. They said that the kidnappers typically operate in groups of up to a dozen or more people, and are often heavily armed with Kalashnikovs and other military assault weapons. Many wear military clothes and appear to belong, or to have belonged, to one of the many armed groups active in eastern Congo.

The kidnappers often followed a similar procedure, beating, whipping, or threatening their hostages with death, demanding that they call their relatives or employers to press them to pay for the person’s release. The kidnappers often used the victims’ cell phones or their own to negotiate the ransom payments. Sometimes the kidnappers abducted a single hostage, in other cases, a group.

In one example, on September 2, armed men kidnapped a 27-year-old student near the general hospital in Goma and took her to a remote forest location, where she was held with other hostages. The kidnappers beat and abused the hostages, including burning them with bayonets heated in a fire. “When we asked for food, they chose a man among us and cut his throat, killing him,” she told Human Rights Watch. “‘If you want to eat, here’s the meat,’ they told us.” She was held for nine days, and released after her family paid a ransom.

In the cases Human Rights Watch documented, kidnappers demanded between US$200 and US$30,000 per hostage, though the amounts paid were often much lower than the amount sought, according to relatives and former hostages.

The ransom payments often caused severe financial hardship for families. One man had to sell his farmland to pay off the money his family had borrowed to pay for his release, leaving his family with no source of income.

Kidnappers also targeted national and international aid workers, contract staff working for the United Nations, and drivers for a major transportation company. In all cases they were later released. No information was made public on whether ransoms were paid.

In most of the cases Human Rights Watch documented, relatives of the hostages did not inform police or other authorities about the kidnapping, either because they believed they would get no assistance or because they feared that it might make matters worse and that they would face further extortion from the authorities for any assistance provided. One former hostage said that when her mother told a judicial official in Goma that her daughter had been kidnapped, his only response was that the mother should “go pay.”

At least 14 people were kidnapped close to areas where Congolese soldiers were based, leading some of the victims and their families to speculate that the soldiers may have been complicit. Human Rights Watch found no credible evidence indicating that Congolese soldiers participated in the kidnappings, though some of those involved appear to be members or former members of armed groups that Congolese army officers had armed or supported in the past.

One of the implicated groups is the Force for the Defense of the Interests of Congolese People (FDIPC), which collaborated with the Congolese army during military operations against the M23 rebel group in 2012 and 2013, according to Human Rights Watch and UN research. Former hostages and local authorities told Human Rights Watch that FDIPC fighters and former fighters were responsible for some of the kidnappings.

On April 14, 2015, Congolese authorities arrested FDIPC’s military commander, Jean Emmanuel Biriko (known as Manoti), his wife, and a dozen of his fighters and charged them with kidnapping, among other crimes. Their trial began a day later in a military court in the town of Rutshuru. On May 18, following deeply flawed proceedings in which the rights of the accused were violated, the court convicted Manoti and 10 of his co-accused and sentenced them to death for belonging to a criminal gang. Although the death penalty is still permitted in Congo, there has been a moratorium on executions since 2003. Human Rights Watch opposes the death penalty in all circumstances as an inhumane and irrevocable punishment.

During the trial, Manoti alleged that he collaborated with several Congolese army officers, including one he said was involved in the kidnapping incidents. Human Rights Watch has not been able to identify any judicial investigations into the alleged role played by these or other army officers, although government and military officials know of these allegations. A high-ranking army intelligence officer acknowledged to Human Rights Watch that Manoti “might have worked with some of the military” during the kidnapping incidents.

The arrest of Manoti and his men did not end the kidnappings. The majority of cases Human Rights Watch documented in 2015 occurred after their arrest. While Congolese authorities say they have arrested other alleged kidnappers, none have been brought to trial.

Citing the “immeasurable scale” of kidnappings in eastern Congo, the National Assembly’s Defense and Security Commission held a hearing on December 3 with the Vice Prime Minister and Interior Minister Evariste Boshab about the government’s response. Boshab replied that the situation is “extremely worrying” and “among the biggest security challenges confronting the government today.”

Three commission members said it was agreed that a parliamentary commission of inquiry would be established to investigate the kidnappings and possible complicity by government and security officials, and to assess what has already been done and make recommendations.

Human Rights Watch urged the commission to endorse the creation of a special police unit to document and respond to kidnapping cases; identify and arrest alleged kidnappers; report alleged complicity between kidnappers and officials; and work with judicial officers to bring those found responsible to justice in fair and credible trials.

“Putting an end to the kidnapping threat should be a top priority for the Congolese government,” Sawyer said. “The authorities not only need to bring those responsible to justice in fair trials, but also to uncover and act against any officials involved.”

Press Release from Human Rights Watch.

Click here for more Human Rights Watch reporting on the situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

(mew)

December 15, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

U.S. Has 15 Months to Implement WTO Ruling on Antidumping Dispute With Viet Nam on Frozen Warmwater Shrimp

Vietnam WTO ShrimpAn arbitrator for the World Trade Organization has issued his award regarding the “reasonable period of time” to implement the recommendations and rulings of the Dispute Settlement Body (DSB) in the dispute “United States – Anti-Dumping Measures on Certain Shrimp from Viet Nam” (WT/DS429/12). The arbitrator determined that the “reasonable period of time” for the United States to implement the DSB’s recommendations and rulings in this dispute is 15 months from the adoption of the panel and Appellate Body reports. The case first arose in 2012 when Viet Nam requested consultations with the United States concerning a number of anti-dumping measures on certain frozen warmwater shrimp from Viet Nam

Click here for the arbitrator's decision and for more information and background about the dispute.

(mew)

December 15, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

ICC Prosecutor Calls on Security Coucil to Help Bring High-Profile Indictees to Justice for Darfur War Crimes

ICC Prosecutor Fatou BensoudaThe Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) today chided the United Nations Security Council for its “empty promises” to bring Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir to trial for atrocities in Darfur, even as his victims cry out for justice amid indiscriminate killings and mass rape.

“Despite my repeated requests for the Council to take action with respect to Sudan’s blatant disregard of its obligations, and in violation of [it’s] resolutions, my appeals continue to be unheeded,” Fatou Bensouda told the 15-member body, noting that it was the Council itself which had referred the case of Sudan to the ICC more than 10 years ago.

“I observe with great regret that the adoption of each resolution has, in practical terms, amounted to no more than an empty promise,” she added, stressing that Mr. Al-Bashir is not only a fugitive from justice who continues to travel across international borders, but he also harbours other fugitives and refuses to facilitate their surrender to the ICC.

In 2005, the Council asked the Hague-based Court to investigate war crimes in Darfur. ICC judges issued arrest warrants in 2009 for Mr. Al-Bashir and other top officials for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes in the western Darfur region, where up to 300,000 people may have died and over 2 million been displaced since civil war erupted in 2003 between the Government and rebels.

“If I may be so bold, this Council must do more to demonstrate its commitment to Darfur,” Ms. Bensouda stressed. “It must confidently play its part in facilitating the arrest of suspects against whom the Court has issued warrants of arrest. It must act concretely on the Court's non-compliance communications.”

Ms. Bensouda, who has pleaded for Council action in her presentations before it over the past three years, noted that year after year, the victims’ hopes for justice and a durable peace have been dashed.

“Instead, the people of Darfur have continued to endure desolation, alleged gross violations of human rights, indiscriminate killings, mass rape and sexual abuse, while the individuals against whom ICC arrest warrants have been issued, and who may be implicated in these crimes, continue to evade justice,” she declared.

“Countless victims have been demoralized. After all, who can blame them when attaining justice appears so remote; not the least because of the absence of adequate follow-up and support from the Council. Their frustration and resignation in the face of inaction must weigh heavily on our collective conscience,” she said, urging the Council to take appropriate measures.

“Terrible crimes allegedly continue to be perpetrated in Darfur,” she concluded. “Only strong and committed action by the Council and States will stop the commission of grave crimes in Darfur and ensure that the perpetrators of past crimes are held accountable.”

(UN Press Release)

December 15, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Arrests of Human Rights Defenders in Cuba

The top United Nations human rights official expressed concern today over the extremely high number of arbitrary arrests and short-term detentions of individuals, including human rights defenders and dissidents, in Cuba in recent weeks.

“There have been many hundreds of arbitrary arrests and short-term detentions – which in my view amount to harassment – in the past six weeks alone, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein said today.

These often take place without a warrant and ahead of specific meetings or demonstrations, and seem to be aimed at preventing people from exercising their right to freedom of expression and to peaceful assembly, he continued.

Mr. Zeid was particularly shocked that a number of people, including members of the Ladies in White non-governmental organization, were arrested on 10 December, Human Rights Day.

“This shows an extraordinary disdain for the importance of human rights on the part of the Cuban authorities,” he said.

The High Commissioner urged the authorities to respect everyone’s right to freedom of expression, and to peaceful assembly and association, and to stop arbitrarily arresting people, in particular before, during or after peaceful demonstrations.

“I call for the release of all those arbitrarily arrested who may still be in detention as a consequence of the legitimate exercise of their rights,” Mr. Zeid concluded.

(UN Press Release)

December 15, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

President of the University of Iowa Apologizes for Suggesting that Unprepared Professors Should Be Shot

Several news sources are reporting today that the President of the University of Iowa, J. Bruce Harreld, has apologized for suggesting that professors who are unprepared to teach should be shot.

(mew)

December 15, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)