Saturday, June 11, 2011

Constitutional Reforms in Mexico Incorporate International Human Rights Norms

The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, has praised constitutional reforms in Mexico because they promote the protection of human rights. 

The changes to the Mexican charter, which give constitutional status to all human rights that are guaranteed in international treaties to which Mexico is party, are aimed at guaranteeing individuals the most favourable interpretation of human rights law, including internationally recognized human rights, in all settings, according to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).  Eleven articles of the constitution have been amended.

“This is a milestone that is the result of years of hard work and discussion by stakeholders from many different sectors of society: members of the Mexican Congress, Senate, academics and civil society,” Ms. Pillay said.

The OHCHR office in Mexico has been working closely with various parties on the reform through the years and commends its passage, she said.  “It should reinforce the universality, indivisibility and interdependence of all human rights and it should help the country address some of the important human rights challenges it is currently facing.”

Ms. Pillay cited as important the restrictions that the reform places on the declaration of a state of emergency and the protection of human rights in such circumstances, OHCHR said. She also welcomed the strengthened role of the human rights ombudsman and the provisions on rights protection in educational settings and detention centres.

(mew) (adapted from a UN Press Release)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/international_law/2011/06/mexico.html

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