Monday, May 24, 2010

Should Taiwan have Oberserver Status at the ICAO?

Taiwan's status within international organizations has always presented interesting political and legal issues.  Taiwan, for example, is not a member of the United Nations. It is, however, a member of the World Trade Organization.

Senator Tim Johnson of South Dakota introduced S Con Res 63, expressing the sense of Congress that Taiwan should be accorded observer status in the International Civil Aviation Organization.  The proposed resolution was assigned to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.  Get more information on page S3908 of the Congressional Record (May 18, 2010).

(By way of background, Senator Johnson introduced another resolution in 2007 that called for lifting of travel restrictions to the U.S. by “high level and elected officials of Taiwan, including the President of Taiwan” and for direct Cabinet level exchanges to strengthen a policy dialog with Taiwan.)

Concurrent resolutions, if passed by Congress, are not submitted to the president.  They lack the force of law.  They are instead intended to express the sentiments of the Congress in a formal way towards a particular political or legal issue.

Hat tip to the ABA Governmental Affairs Office

Click here for more information about the ICAO.

(mew)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/international_law/2010/05/taiwan.html

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