Saturday, March 28, 2009

American Bar Association


ABA The nominee for president-elect of the American Bar Association is Stephen N. Zack, a partner in the law firm of Boies, Schiller and Flexner, and a member of the Section Council for the ABA Section of International Law.  He is a Cuban-American who has practiced law in Miami for more than 35 years, said he also plans to convene a commission to focus on Hispanic legal rights, including immigration, voting and consumer rights.

He is a former Chair of the ABA House of Delegates (a very prestigious position within the ABA) and is a former member of the Board of Governors,  He is also a former president of the Florida State Bar and a former president of the National Conference of Bar Presidents.

I have known Steve for many years and am very happy to see that he will become President of the American Bar Association.  If elected at the ABA Annual Meeting in Chicago in August, he will begin his one-year term as president in August 2010.

(mew)

March 28, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, March 27, 2009

ASIL Task Force Recommendations on the United States and the International Criminal Court


The American Society of International Law’s independent Task Force on U.S. Policy Toward the International Criminal Court issued its report today urging President Obama to announce a policy of positive engagement with the Court.  The report can be viewed online by clicking here.   

Hat tip to Sheila Ward.

(mew)

March 27, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

New WTO Video on Financing Trade During the Financial Crisis

WTO 80 percent One of the side effects of the current financial crisis is its impact on trade finance. This very secure form of credit has become more expensive or dried up completely. The lack of credit lines and trade guarantees is one important reason for the reduction in trade flows, as exporters cannot ship their merchandise without them. The impact is even more severe for developing countries. Kimberly Wiehl, Secretary-General of the Berne Union, and Steven Beck, Head of Trade Finance at the Asian Development Bank, discuss the issues with Keith Rockwell, WTO Spokesperson.  Click here to see the video debate.
 

March 27, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Interdisciplinary Conference on Human Trafficking

Papers and poster presentations are sought for an Interdisciplinary Conference on Human Trafficking, to be held on October 29-31, 2009, at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  Proposals are due this week (by March 30th).  I've attended many conferences in Nebraska (and previously clerked for the Nebraska Supreme Court) so I can tell you that Lincoln is actually a pretty nice place to have a conference like this, and that the interdisciplinary nature of the conference will make it quite interesting for you as both a presenter and a participant.  (Lincoln is also well known to many immigration attorneys who have to file appeals there.)  Click here to visit the Intlawgrrls website, which has more information about this conference and the call for papers.


(mew)

March 26, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Updates from the ASIL Meetings in Washington, DC

ASIL - 80 Percent

With the new Obama Administration in office, including the confirmation of the new US Trade Representative, Ron Kirk, as well as the nomination of Yale Dean Harold Koh to head the Office of Legal Advisor, there has been lots of talk at ASIL about the future of international law in the Obama Administration.  

On the trade front, some of hot issues appear to be pressure to focus on more and better enforcement of trade laws, the relationship between trade and other issues such as labor, energy and the environment, and the possible renegotiation of NAFTA.  The US trade relationship with China is on the front burner, particularly with respect to allegations of Chinese manipulation of its currency and negotiation of a bilateral investment treaty (BIT) between the US and China.  There appears to be some interest in modifying trade preference programs that benefit developing countries to ensure that the benefits go to the countries who most need it.  Of the three bilateral free trade agreements (FTAs) currently pending, the consensus seems to be that the US-Panama FTA would be most likely to move forward the fastest, possibly followed by the FTA with Columbia and then possibly South Korea, although there seemed to be some doubts as to the viability of the agreement with South Korea in particular at the present time.

More broadly, the Obama Administration is still struggling with what to do with the detainees at Guantanamo Bay in light of Obama's commitment to close that facility by end of the year.  Other major international law issues include the possible ratification of the Law of the Sea Treaty and the future relationship between the U.S. and the International Criminal Court. 

(cgb)

March 26, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

What's in a name?

The Washington Post published an article today entitled, "Global War on Terror Is Given New Name," stating that the Obama Administration intends to replace the phrase "global war on terror" with "overseas contingency operations."  The move apparently is designed to distance the Obama Administration from the rhetoric of the Bush Administration and better reflect the fact that there are different militant groups fighting the U.S. that should not be grouped together in a way that overstates their strength.  The Obama Administration also may be responding in part to the urging of the International Commission on Jurists to drop the phrase "war on terror" because it was used to justify human rights and humanitarian law violations.

As law professors, we often teach our students that words matter and that it is important to select the correct word or phrase to convey the exact meaning and intent.  When the Bush Administration used the phrase "war on terror," there was much discussion in the media and among academics as to whether it meant a war in the traditional sense that would invoke international law governing the use of force and what affect that would have on the ability of states engaged in the "war on terror" to derogate from certain international human rights obligations.  While the Obama Administration appears to be backing away from the use of the word "war", it is not at all clear what is meant by "overseas contingency operations."  The new phrase is broad enough and vague enough to cover all sorts of situations, from responses to actual armed hostilities to delivery of aid in the face of a natural disaster.  Thus, I suspect many persons will still not be certain as to the meaning and intent of the new phraseology.

(cgb)  

March 25, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Change in TILIG Program at ASIL Meeting

The Teaching International Law Interest Group (TILIG) is hosting a program on Using Simulations to Enhance Teaching of International Law at the ASIL conference tomorrow, Thursday, 3/26 from 3-4:30 pm.  The program had been scheduled in the Executive Forum, but has been been moved to Colonnade.  Hope to see you there!

(cgb)  

March 25, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

American Society of International Law

ASIL - 80 PercentThe American Society of International Law (ASIL) is holding its 103rd Annual Meeting March 25-28, 2009, at the Fairmont Hotel, 2401 M Street, NW, Washington, DC. The theme of this year’s conference is "International Law as Law."

We invite you to send us reports of panel presentations you may be attending and meetings, such as that for ASIL TILIG (the Interest Group for Teaching International Law). 

(mew)

March 25, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS)

ITLOS has announced its 2009-2010 training programme on dispute settlement under the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea. The program offers young government officials and researchers working in the field of the law of the sea or dispute settlement in-depth knowledge of the dispute-settlement mechanisms available to States under Part XV of the Convention. The programme will be offered to five participants and will run from 1 July 2009 to 31 March 2010. Lectures, case studies and training in negotiation, mediation and delimitation of maritime areas will enable participants to acquire a deeper understanding of the dispute-settlement mechanisms under the Convention. Study visits will be made to organizations dealing with law of the sea matters. Lectures will also be given on current issues of the law of the sea (fisheries, environment, climate change, delimitation).  Interested candidates should consult the website of the Tribunal to find more information and forms that must be sent in before April 30, 2009.  

March 25, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Special Tribunal for Lebanon

The tribunal established by the United Nations to try the perpetrators of a car bomb blast that killed former Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri of Lebanon has appointed its main officials and adopted rules of procedures and evidence, according to the President of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, Antonio Cassese of Italy.  He was also the first president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).  The Special Tribunal for Lebanon (like the ICTY) is located in the Hague, a city that is sometimes called "the world's courthouse."

(mew) 

March 25, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Human Trafficking

Jonathan Todres, an Associate Professor of Law at Georgia State University College of Law, has a new arrticle in the Santa Clara Law Review on "Law, Otherness, and Human Trafficking."  I've known Jonathan for many years (and even edited a book with him and Cris Revasz on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child).  He does excellent work.  I hope that you have a chance to take a look at his article.

(mew)

March 24, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

WTO News

WTO economists predicted this week that trade will decline by 9% worldwide in 2009, raising additional fears about increasing numbers of protectionist measures that could be contrary to the letter and spirit of the WTO Agreements.

The WTO Council on Trade in Goods also met this week and took several actions.  It approved long-standing waiver requests from the U.S. for various trade preference programs intended to assist developing countries. The U.S. requested waivers for the Andean Trade Preference Act (ATPA), the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA). Several less developed nations commented on how important these programs are for their development, especially with respect to job creation and helping to create a stable investment climate.  The Council will now forward its recommendation that the waivers be approved to the General Council.  The Council also appointed chairpersons for its various subcomittees and took notice of seven regional free trade agreements that had been notified to it, including two by the United States - one with Peru and the other with Oman.

(cgb)

March 24, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, March 23, 2009

Global Legal Skills Conference IV

Click here for registration and hotel information for the fourth Global Legal Skills Conference, which will be held in June at Georgetown University Law Center in Washington DC.  This conference focuses on skills education for international lawyers, Legal English, teaching abroad, international exchanges, and similar topics.

(mew)

March 23, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, March 22, 2009

Journal of African Communications

The Journal of African Communications welcomes articles for possible publication.  Contact Andy Alali in the Department of Communications at California State University in Bakersfield, California.  Click here to send an email.

(mew)

March 22, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

US support for deeper EU integration

Images

In an interview with The Irish Times (03/20), Hillary Clinton expressed her support for deeper EU political integration and a more effective EU foreign policy as envisaged in the Lisbon Treaty.

While it is not my intention to question the genuine character of secretary of state’s support, it is important to recall that the Bush administration constantly sought to prevent the emergence of EU common answers to the most sensitive issues of the day (Iraq war, the International Criminal Court, climate change, etc.). Some skeptics argue that the US only supports an enhanced foreign policy role for the EU because it needs to be assisted by a more effective vassal. 

Regardless of the US’s ambivalent attitude towards European integration, Hillary Clinton is right to view the Lisbon Treaty as a significant step towards a more effective EU foreign policy. On the future impact of the Lisbon Treaty (assuming that it will be ratified), see a recent report published by The Federal Trust, a British think tank.

While I fully agree with the report’s two main points: (i) the EU needs a strong foreign policy machinery if it wants to meet current global challenges; (ii) the Lisbon Treaty holds considerable potential in this regard, it is important to stress that key decisions will continue under the Lisbon Treaty to be taken by the Member States by unanimous vote. In other words, foreign and security policy is one area where essential authority will continue to remain with EU national governments. Accordingly, one should not expect the emergence of the EU as a “global power” in lieu and place of its Member States.

LP

March 22, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)