Thursday, September 18, 2014

ILSA Journal Call for Submissions

The International Law Student Association (ILSA) Journal of International and Comparative Law, housed at Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad Law Center, is seeking submissions for its next issue.  It is interested in articles from academics writing about international and comparative law, as well as from practitioners in international law.  For more information, please visit the journal's website here.

(cgb)

September 18, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Drexel Law School Gets $50 Million Gift

Drexel University School of Law announced this week that Thomas R. Kline, a trial lawyer in Philadelphia, would give the law school $50 million to help it reach the top ranks of legal education. Drexel was established only eight years ago. Click here to read more.

Kline's gift appears to be the fourth-largest ever to a U.S. law school.  The largest seems to have been a $130 million contribution to the University of Arizona School of Law, followed by a $100 million gift to the law school of Ave Maria University in Florida and by a $55 million gift to the Chapman University School of Law.  

(mew)

September 18, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

U.S. Constitution Day

Constitution DaySeptember 17 is U.S. Constitution Day.  On this day, educational and other institutions around the country engage in activities to commemorate and celebrate our Constitution and to educate the public about its provisions. 

The U.S. Constitution is the oldest written constitution in the world at 227 years old.  It is also the shortest constitution, containing only 4,440 words.  It has been amended only 27 times in its history.

The U.S. Constitution has also been an inspiration for many other constitutions around the world.  Concepts such as the rule of law, judicial review, separation of powers, federalism, and individual rights have all found expression in other constitutions, although today, many more modern constitutions have longer and more express provisions for the protection of human rights.

(cgb)

September 17, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Symposium Starts Tomorrow in Baltimore on the Legitimacy of International Courts

The University of Baltimore School of Law will host a symposium on "Legitimacy and International Courts" on September 18-19, 2014 at the Angelos Law Center in Baltimore.

Symposium participants include Professor Andrea Bjorkland (McGill), Allen Buchanan (Duke), Harlan Cohen (Georgia), Margaret de Guzman (Temple), Andreas Follesdal (Oslo), Nienke Grossman (Baltimore), Chiara Giorgetti (Richmond), Alexandra Huneeus (Wisconsin), Matthias Kumm (New York University), Molly Land (Connecticut), Joost Pauwelyn (The Graduate Institute, Geneva), Mark Pollack (Temple), Mortimer Sellers (Baltimore), Yuval Shany (Hebrew University), Anastasia Telestsky (Idaho), Geir Ulfstein (Oslo), and Erik Voeten (Georgetown).

For more information about the program, click here.

(mew)

September 17, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Dates Announced for the Global Legal Skills Conference in Chicago (May 2015)

Chicago Buildings 1Save the date for GLS-10!

The tenth edition of the Global Legal Skills Conference will be held in Chicago, Illinois on May 20-22, 2015.

GLS-10 will be co-hosted by The John Marshall Law School (where the conference originated) and Northwestern University School of Law.  It will also be co-sponsored by a law school in Mexico, the Facultad Libre de Derecho de Monterrey (which twice hosted the conference in the past).

The Global Legal Skills Conference is a unique, international conference that brings together professors who teach skills, professors who teach substantive law (and especially international law), practicing attorneys, judges, and law students from around the world. At the last GLS conference (held in Verona, Italy) there were 180 participants from more than 20 countries. The conference has also been held in Costa Rica and in Washington D.C.

(mew)

September 16, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Europe, Eurasia, and Emerging Threats

The Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia, and Emerging Threats, U.S. House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee, will hold a hearing on terror threats in Europe on September 19, 2014 at 10 am, 2172 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington D.C.  If you go, tell us how it went.

h/t ABA GAO

(mew)

September 16, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

UN Celebrates the 150th Ratification of the Disabilities Treaty

The United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights issued a press release yesterday annoucing that Guyana had become the 150th state to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.  The Convention took effect in 2008 and has experienced one of the fastest rates of ratification of any human rights treaty.  It has served to raise awareness about disabilities and helps to promote fair treatment of persons with disabilities.

Unfortunately, the United States is not a member of the treaty.  The United States signed the treaty in 2009, but has not yet ratified it.  The first time the Senate voted on the treaty in 2012, it fell 5 votes short of the number needed for ratification. The US Sentate Foreign Relations Committee recommended ratification to the full Senate again on July 22, 2014, but the Senate has not yet taken another vote.

(cgb)

September 16, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, September 15, 2014

Scottish Referendum for Independence

Scottish flagAs many persons who follow international law are likely aware, this Thursday, September 18, Scottish voters will vote on whether to remain part of the United Kingdom (UK) or whether to secede and form an independent state.  Pollsters currently report that the voting public is almost evenly divided.  If the vote is in favor of independence, the Scottish National Party (SNP) will then begin negotiations for independence with the UK government. While the UK government is not necessarily bound by the referendum results, the UK government has indicated that it will recognize the vote and engage in independence negotiations.  Even if the vote for independence is negative, the UK government has indicated that it is willing to discuss a greater measure of autonomy for Scotland.

The push for independence is driven largely by economic concerns.  In particular, the Scots desire greater control of Scotland's offshore oil and gas reserves and some want to use that revenue to fund education and welfare spending in Scotland.

Independence would raise many tricky legal questions.  For example, the Scots currently use the Bristish pound as their currency. It is not clear what currency they will use if they secede.  Scotland is part of the European Union (EU) through its membership in the United Kingdom. If it forms an independent state, it may have to apply for membership to the EU and meet the EU's economic and other criteria for membership.  Scotish residents participate in national health care and pensions systems that are run by the UK, which will also likely change with independence.

The Scottish independence referendum may have implications for other secessionist movements in Europe and elsewhere.  Many point to the quest of the Catalons in Spain for independence, for example.  However, many legal scholars also point out that the UK's acquiesence in the Scottish referendum sets it apart from many other independence movements where the mother country has not consented to any groups breaking away.

(cgb)

September 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 12, 2014

Bassiouni on International Extradition -- New Sixth Edition

Bassiouni Extradition 6th edM. Cherif Bassiouni is Emeritus Professor of Law at DePaul University College of Law in Chicago, where he taught from 1964-2012.  He was a founding member of the International Human Rights Law Institute (established in 1990), and served as President from 1990-1997, and then President Emeritus. In 1972, he was one of the founders of the International Institute of Higher Studies in Criminal Sciences (ISISC) located in Siracusa, Italy, where he served as Dean from 1972-1989 and now serves as President. He recently organized an extraordinary High-Level Meeting of Experts in International Criminal Law and International Human Rights Law, with 94 participants from 38 countries.

So let's just say he's always been a busy guy, and he hasn't slowed down a bit since taking Emeritus Status.

But busy people have a way of getting things done, and Bassiouni is no exception here.  He has just published the sixth edition of International Extradition: United States Law and Practice, published by Oxford University Press.  This is a comprehensive,  must-have title for anyone doing work with international extradition, with 999 pages of text followed by another 296 pages of appendices and indexes. The text is well written and focused. Citaitons are provided throughout for use by practitioners and tribunals.

Here are the subjects covered:

  1. The Legal Framework of Extradition in International Law and Practice
  2. Legal Bases for Extradition in the United States
  3. Asylum and Extradition
  4. Disguised Extradition: The Use of Immigration Laws as Alternatives to Extradition
  5. Abduction and Unlawful Seizure as Alternatives to Extradition
  6. Theories of Jurisdiction and Their Application
  7. Substantive Requirements: Dual Criminality, Extraditable Offenses, and Non-Inquiry
  8. Denial of Extradition: Defenses, Exceptions, Exemptions, and Exclusions
  9. Pretrial Proceedings
  10. The Extradition Hearing
  11. The Review Process and Executive Discretion
  12. Surrender and Miscellaneous Matters

This book provides the most comprehensive coverage on international extradition and is an essential title for anyone working in the area.  But even if your work or scholarship doesn't deal directly with extradition, you'll find yourself falling into the pages of this book. Topics such as secret evidence, head of state and diplomatic immunity, and in abstentia convictions will reach out and grab your intellectual curiosity. 

(mew)

September 12, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Anniversary of the Terrorist Attacks of 9/11/2011

9-11On this the thirteenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, we pause to remember all those who lost their lives and their friends and families.  Our thoughts and prayers also go out to the members of the armed forces who continue to fight terrorism in the Middle East and elsewhere, as well as the innocent civilians who have been injured ot killed or who live in a state of fear of extremist terrorist groups.  As international lawyers, we must work with the rest of the international community to find ways to resolve disputes peacefully and to promote respect for and protection of human rights everywhere.

(cgb)

September 11, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Reminder: Call for Papers on International Human Rights Law -- Deadline is September 15

CALL FOR PAPERS

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS -- NEW VOICES PANEL
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS (AALS)

January 2-5, 2015, Washington, D.C.

The AALS Section on International Human Rights has issued a call for papers for its "New Voices in Human Rights" program during the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The program will be called Global Perspectives on Human Rights. It will take place during the AALS Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for January 2-5, 2015. The section anticipates selecting three or four new voices from this call for papers to present their work during the Section’s program.

The focus on Global Perspectives on Human Rights will explore how human rights discourses, practices, and institutions have taken root (or not) in various terrains. While we are not categorically excluding papers that discuss human rights in the United States, we are interested in how human rights are experienced in other parts of the world, particularly areas that have not traditionally been a focus of international human rights research by scholars in the United States.

Deadline and Submission

The deadline to submit a paper is September 15, 2014. Please email submissions in Word or PDF format to Professor Stuart Ford of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago (sford@jmls.edu) and Professor Jonathan Todres of Georgia State University (jtodres@gsu.edu). In selecting proposals, priority will be given to new voices in international human rights (i.e., individuals who have not previously presented a paper at AALS on the topic of international human rights). Presentations at various stages of completion will be considered. Decisions will be made in late September.

Publication

Papers may have already been accepted for publication but must not have been published before the Annual Meeting. The section has no plans to publish the selected papers, and individual presenters should continue to seek their own publishers.

Eligibility

This call for papers is open only to full-time faculty at an AALS member school. Presenters will be expected to cover their own costs in attending the AALS annual meeting.

For any questions or inquiries please contact Professor Stuart Ford at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago at sford@jmls.edu.

(mew)

 

September 11, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

Several new bills have been introduced in the United States Congress to authorize force against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.  Here are the bills:

  • HJ Res 123 (Issa, R-CA), to authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL); to Foreign Affairs. CR 9/8/14, H7296.
  • SJ Res 42 (Nelson, D-FL), to authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against ISIL; to Foreign Relations. CR 9/8/14, S5374.
  • SJ Res 43 (Inhofe, R-OK), to authorize the use of force against the organization called the Islamic State in order to defend the American people and assist the Iraqi government in expelling the Islamic State from their territory; to Foreign Relations. CR 9/8/14, S5374.
  • H Res 718 (Schweikert, R-AZ), calling on the Department of Defense to expedite the delivery of all necessary military equipment, weapons, ammunition and other needed materials to the Kurdish Peshmerga forces to successfully combat and defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS); to Foreign Affairs. CR 9/9/14, H7388.

 

The U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee will hold a hearing on Iraq, Syria, and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). 9/16/14, 9:30 am, 216 Hart Building, Washington, D.C.

 

Hat tip to the ABA Governmental Affairs Office

(mew)

September 10, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, September 8, 2014

Reminder: Call for Papers on International Human Rights Law

CALL FOR PAPERS

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS -- NEW VOICES PANEL
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS (AALS)

January 2-5, 2015, Washington, D.C.

The AALS Section on International Human Rights has issued a call for papers for its "New Voices in Human Rights" program during the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The program will be called Global Perspectives on Human Rights. It will take place during the AALS Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for January 2-5, 2015. The section anticipates selecting three or four new voices from this call for papers to present their work during the Section’s program.

The focus on Global Perspectives on Human Rights will explore how human rights discourses, practices, and institutions have taken root (or not) in various terrains. While we are not categorically excluding papers that discuss human rights in the United States, we are interested in how human rights are experienced in other parts of the world, particularly areas that have not traditionally been a focus of international human rights research by scholars in the United States.

Deadline and Submission

The deadline to submit a paper is September 15, 2014. Please email submissions in Word or PDF format to Professor Stuart Ford of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago (sford@jmls.edu) and Professor Jonathan Todres of Georgia State University (jtodres@gsu.edu). In selecting proposals, priority will be given to new voices in international human rights (i.e., individuals who have not previously presented a paper at AALS on the topic of international human rights). Presentations at various stages of completion will be considered. Decisions will be made in late September.

Publication

Papers may have already been accepted for publication but must not have been published before the Annual Meeting. The section has no plans to publish the selected papers, and individual presenters should continue to seek their own publishers.

Eligibility

This call for papers is open only to full-time faculty at an AALS member school. Presenters will be expected to cover their own costs in attending the AALS annual meeting.

For any questions or inquiries please contact Professor Stuart Ford at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago at sford@jmls.edu.

(mew)

 

September 8, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Deadline Approaching for AALS International Law Section Call for Papers

The Section on International Law of the American Association of Law Schools (AALS) is seeking papers for its program at the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. on Sunday, January 4 at 10:30 am.

The topic of the program and call for papers is “The Influence of International Law on U.S. Government Decision-Making.” This panel will explore the role that international law plays in informing the policy outcomes arrived at by U.S. government decision-makers.  To what extent is international law determinative or even influential, and to what extent does the policy area, the branch of government, or the ideological orientation of the decision-maker matter? As a more practical matter, at what stage in the decision-making process is international law taken into account and who are the most influential actors?  How can academics be most influential in that process?  The presenter chosen through this call for papers will join current or former U.S. government officials in a panel discussion.

Eligible faculty members are invited to submit manuscripts or detailed abstracts that address any of numerous issues related to the way in which international law infuses decision-making within the United States government.

Eligibility

Per AALS policy, only full-time faculty members of AALS member law schools are eligible to submit a paper to a call for papers. The following are ineligible: faculty at fee-paid law schools, international, visiting (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school) and adjunct faculty members, graduate students, and non-law school faculty.  Untenured faculty members are particularly encouraged to submit papers.

Registration fee and expenses

The selected Call for Papers participant is responsible for paying his or her AALS annual meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Form and length of submission

Eligible faculty members are invited to submit manuscripts or detailed abstracts dealing with any aspect of the foregoing topic.  Detailed abstracts should be comprehensive enough to allow the selection committee to meaningfully evaluate the aims and likely content of papers proposed.  Papers may be accepted for publication but must not be published prior to the Annual Meeting.

Deadline and submission method

Papers must be submitted electronically to: Ms. Carol Manis, Assistant to Professor Cindy Buys at Southern Illinois University School of Law. The subject of the email should read: “Submission for AALS Section on International Law.”

The initial review of the papers and abstracts will be blind, and will be conducted by members of the section’s executive committee.  In order to facilitate blind review, please identify yourself and your institutional affiliation only in the cover letter accompanying your manuscript, and not in the manuscript itself.  The submitting author is responsible for taking any steps necessary to redact self-identifying text or footnotes.  

The deadline for submission is September 12, 2014.

The author of the selected paper/abstract will be notified by September 28, 2014.

(cgb)

September 8, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 5, 2014

Graduate Programs for Non-U.S. Lawyers

Join the Association of American Law Schools Section on Graduate Programs for Non-U.S. Lawyers at its business meeting on Friday, January 2, 2015 at 6:30 p.m. That's the first night of the conference when the Registration Area opens. 

Professor George Edwards of Indiana University is the current chair. Professor Mark E. Wojcik of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago is the Chair-Elect and will become Section Chair at the end of that AALS Annual meeting. 

When you book your flight or train to DC, please plan to arrive in time to attend the 6:30 p.m. business meeting and to share your ideas on graduate legal education for international lawyers.

September 5, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Reminder: Call for Papers on International Human Rights Law

CALL FOR PAPERS

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS -- NEW VOICES PANEL
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS (AALS)

January 2-5, 2015, Washington, D.C.

The AALS Section on International Human Rights has issued a call for papers for its "New Voices in Human Rights" program during the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The program will be called Global Perspectives on Human Rights. It will take place during the AALS Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for January 2-5, 2015. The section anticipates selecting three or four new voices from this call for papers to present their work during the Section’s program.

The focus on Global Perspectives on Human Rights will explore how human rights discourses, practices, and institutions have taken root (or not) in various terrains. While we are not categorically excluding papers that discuss human rights in the United States, we are interested in how human rights are experienced in other parts of the world, particularly areas that have not traditionally been a focus of international human rights research by scholars in the United States.

Deadline and Submission

The deadline to submit a paper is September 15, 2014. Please email submissions in Word or PDF format to Professor Stuart Ford of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago (sford@jmls.edu) and Professor Jonathan Todres of Georgia State University (jtodres@gsu.edu). In selecting proposals, priority will be given to new voices in international human rights (i.e., individuals who have not previously presented a paper at AALS on the topic of international human rights). Presentations at various stages of completion will be considered. Decisions will be made in late September.

Publication

Papers may have already been accepted for publication but must not have been published before the Annual Meeting. The section has no plans to publish the selected papers, and individual presenters should continue to seek their own publishers.

Eligibility

This call for papers is open only to full-time faculty at an AALS member school. Presenters will be expected to cover their own costs in attending the AALS annual meeting.

For any questions or inquiries please contact Professor Stuart Ford at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago at sford@jmls.edu.

(mew)

 

September 3, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Somalia Institutes Proceedings against Kenya at ICJ

Last week, Somalia instituted a proceeding against Kenya at the International Court of Justice (ICJ) regarding a dispute concerning maritime delimitations in the Indian Ocean.

In its pleadings, Somalia asks the Court "to determine, on the basis of international law, the complete course of the single maritime boundary dividing all the maritime areas appertaining to Somalia and to Kenya in the Indian Ocean, including the continental shelf beyond 200 [nautical miles]". Somalia further asks the Court "to determine the precise geographical co-ordinates of the single maritime boundary in the Indian Ocean."

Somalia contends that the maritime boundary between the Parties in the territorial sea, exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and continental shelf should be established in accordance with Articles 15, 74 and 83 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), to which both Somalia and Kenya belong. Somalia explains that, accordingly, the boundary line in the territorial sea "should be a median line as specified in Article 15, since there are no special circumstances that would justify departure from such a line" and that, in the EEZ and continental shelf, the boundary "should be established according to the three-step process the Court has consistently employed in its application of Articles 74 and 83."

Somalia asserts that "Kenya’s current position on the maritime boundary is that it should be a straight line emanating from the Parties’ land boundary terminus, and extending due east along the parallel of latitude on which the land boundary terminus sits, through the full extent of the territorial sea, EEZ and continental shelf, including the continental shelf beyond 200 [nautical miles]."

In addition to invoking jurisdiction under UNCLOS, Somalia relies upon the declarations both States have filed accepting the ICJ's compulsory jurisdiction under article 36(2) of the Court's statute.

(cgb)

September 2, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

WTO DSB Adopts Appellate Body Report on China's Rare Earth Metals

On Friday, August 29, the World Trade Organization (WTO) Dispute Settlement Body (DSB) adopted the report of the Appellate Body finding that China’s export restrictions on rare earths, tungsten and molybdenum, were in breach of China’s WTO obligations and not justified under the exceptions found in Article XX of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) 1994.  For more information regarding this case, visit the WTO website.

(cgb)

September 2, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, August 31, 2014

International Law Weekend in New York

The American Branch of the International Law Association and the International Law Students Association present an annual International Law Weekend conference.  It's well attended, interesting, and a good reason to spend a weekend in New York.

This year, unfortunately, the International Law Weekend is being held during the same week as the Fall Meeting of the American Bar Association Section of International Law. It's an unfortunate conflict, but it highlights that international law is a rich field with many options for participation.

Here is a link to the call for proposals for the International Law Weekend.  It seems that although the deadline passed some time ago, there might still be an opporuntity to propose an additional panel or two. If nothing else, get this program on your radar and plan to attend ILW New York this October (unless you're in Argentina at the ABA meeting!).

(mew)

August 31, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

International Courts and Legitimacy

The University of Baltimore School of Law will host a symposium on "Legitimacy and International Courts" on September 18-19, 2014 at the Angelos Law Center in Baltimore.

Symposium participants include Professor Andrea Bjorkland (McGill), Allen Buchanan (Duke), Harlan Cohen (Georgia), Margaret de Guzman (Temple), Andreas Follesdal (Oslo), Nienke Grossman (Baltimore), Chiara Giorgetti (Richmond), Alexandra Huneeus (Wisconsin), Matthias Kumm (New York University), Molly Land (Connecticut), Joost Pauwelyn (The Graduate Institute, Geneva), Mark Pollack (Temple), Mortimer Sellers (Baltimore), Yuval Shany (Hebrew University), Anastasia Telestsky (Idaho), Geir Ulfstein (Oslo), and Erik Voeten (Georgetown).

For more information about the program, click here.

(mew)

August 31, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)