Sunday, August 20, 2017

ABA Section of International Law Fall Meeting in Miami

 
What: American Bar Association Section of International Law 2017 Fall Conference
When: October 24-27, 2017

Where: Marriott Marquis | Miami, Florida
MiamiThe ABA Section of International Law’s annual Fall Conference will take place in the vibrant city of Miami from October 24-27th at the JW Marriott Marquis.
The ABA Section of International Law Fall Conference is one of the world’s most important gatherings of international lawyers, attracting over 1,000 attendees from 36 countries. 
The theme of the conference is Doing Business in the Americas in the New Global Economy: A New Dawn in the Hemisphere. With over 65 substantive Continuing Legal Education (CLE) sessions on cutting edge topics with word class speakers, the Fall Conference offers an entire year’s worth of CLE.  The Fall Conference will offer exceptional networking opportunities at some of Miami’s most exciting venues, such as evening receptions at Pérez Art Museum and Jungle Island, and an after-hours party at Ball & Chain in Little Havana, the best neighborhood for live music and salsa dancing. Luncheons will feature exceptional keynote speakers including Luis Almagro (Secretary General of the Organization of American States) and Julio Frenk (President of the University of Miami).
The Fall Conference is a “must-attend” meeting for lawyers with a practice or interest in international legal issues.

Events at the 2017 Fall Conference of the ABA Section of International Law include:
  • A behind-the-Scenes cargo tour of the port of Miami
  • Luncheons with exceptional keynote speakers including Luis Almagro, Secretary General, Organization of American States, and President Julio Frenk, University of Miami
  • Tuesday, Council Reception followed by First Time Attendee Welcome Reception, and Private Chartered Yacht Cruise
  • Wednesday Reception at the Perez Art Museum
  • Thursday, Committee Dinners followed by Women’s Business Law Network Sweet Endings Dessert Reception at Area 31
  • Friday Chair’s Closing Reception at Jungle Island
  • After Hours at Ball and Chain
  • Optional Key West Day Trip
Register before September 8th to lock in early bird discounts. Consider joining the section for additional discounts if your're not already a member of the ABA Section of International Law.
(mew)

August 20, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The International Criminal Court Issues a 2.7 Million Euro Reparation Order for Destruction of Religious and Historic Buildings in Timbuktu

For deliberately attacking religious and historic buildings in Timbuktu, Mali, the International Criminal Court (ICC) has this week issued to Malian Islamist a nearly three million euros Reparations Order, due on 16 February 2018.

“The Chamber highlighted the importance of cultural heritage and stressed that, because of their purpose and symbolism, most cultural property and cultural heritage are unique and of sentimental value,” said the Court, based in The Hague and the world's only permanent war crimes tribunal. “Their destruction thus carries a message of terror and helplessness; destroys part of humanity's shared memory and collective consciousness, and renders humanity unable to transmit its values and knowledge to future generations,” it added.

ICC Trial Chamber VIII issued the Reparations Order in the case of The Prosecutor v. Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi, concluding that Mr. Al Mahdi is liable for 2.7 million euros (roughly $3.2 million) in expenses for individual and collective reparations to the Timbuktu community for intentionally directing attacks against religious and historic buildings in that city.

Noting that Mr Al Mahdi is indigent, the Chamber encouraged the Trust Funds for Victims (“TFV”) to complement the reparations award, directing it to submit a draft implementation plan for 16 February 2018.

Covering the three categories of damage to the attacked historic and religious buildings; consequential economic loss; and moral harm, the ICC stated: “Reparations may assist in promoting reconciliation between the victims of the crime, the affected communities and the convicted person.”

Reparations for site rehabilitation and wider Timbuktu community

“Reparations are to be collective for rehabilitation of the sites and for the community of Timbuktu as a whole to address the financial loss and economic harm as well as the emotional distress suffered as a result of the attack. It may also include symbolic measures – such as a memorial, commemoration or forgiveness ceremony – to give public recognition of the moral harm suffered by the Timbuktu community and those within it,” the ICC statement elaborated.

The Chamber also ordered individual reparations for those whose livelihoods exclusively depended upon the attacked buildings and those whose ancestors' burial sites were damaged in the attack.

As a symbolic measure, the Chamber ordered the Registry to post an excerpt of the video of Mr. Al Mahdi's apology, which it considers “genuine, categorical and empathetic” on the Court's website.

Given the specific nature of the case, it also ordered one symbolic euro to be received by the Malian State and the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Upon subsequent approval by the Chamber, the TFV will identify projects and discrete implementation partners for the Chamber's final approval.

On 27 September 2016, Trial Chamber VIII – composed of Judge Raul C. Pangalangan (Presiding), Judge Antoine Kesia-Mbe Mindua and Judge Bertram Schmitt – unanimously found Mr. Al Mahdi to nine years in prison for committing a war crime by deliberately destroying in 2012 nine mausoleums and the secret gate of the Sidi Yahia mosque in the UNESCO World Heritage site of Timbuktu in Mali.

(adapted from a UN press release)

(mew)

August 20, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Save the Dates! Upcoming ABA International Conferences

The American Bar Association Section of International Law, with more than 20,000 members around the world, has some of the most interesting and productive conferences you'll find. Here's a list of upcoming events. Visit the ABA Section of International Law website for more information on any particular conference or forum.

   
Oct 20-22, 2017: Pre-Fall Conference Module (San Juan, Puerto Rico)
Oct 24-28, 2017: Section of International Law Fall Conference (Miami, Florida)
Jan 31-Feb 6, 2018: ABA/Section Midyear Meeting (Vancouver, Canada)
April 17-21, 2018: Section of International Law Annual Conference (New York City)
June 10-12, 2018: Europe Forum (Copenhagen, Denmark)

(mew)

August 15, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Comparative and Trans-Systemic Legal Education

Victor RamrajVictor V. Ramraj, Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor at the University of Victoria Faculty of Law in Canada, spoke this week to students and faculty at the Jigme Singye Wangchuck School of Law in Thimphu, Bhutan. His topic for the JSW Law Faculty was on "Comparative and Trans-Systemic Legal Education."

Professor Ramraj previously taught at the National University of Singapore (NUS). He holds five degrees from McGill University, the University of Toronto, and Queen’s University Belfast, served as a judicial law clerk at the Federal Court of Appeal in Ottawa and as a litigation lawyer in Toronto, and remains a non-practicing membership in the Law Society of Upper Canada. He has held visiting teaching appointments at Kyushu University and the University of Toronto.

His research interests include comparative constitutional and administrative law, transnational regulation, and the history of and regulatory challenges arising from state-company relationships in Asia. He is currently revising a book manuscript on how national legal orders respond to and interact with economic globalization.

His presentation to the JSW Law Faculty included observations about transnational legal practice, legal systems of other legal traditions, and advances in transnational legal education. Among other things, he discussed his home institution's new program in common law and indigenous law. That new program at the University of Victoria is expected to launch in 2018.

(mew)

August 15, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Reminder: ASIL Women in International Law Mentoring Program - Application Deadline Extended to August 18, 2017

The American Society of International Law (ASIL) and its Women in International Law Interest Group (WILIG) has extended the application deadline for its its fifth year of the Women in International Law Mentoring Program. Since 2013, over 420 women have enrolled in ASIL's Mentoring Program as both mentors and mentees in 10 countries and 28 cities from Tucson to Singapore. The feedback has been extremely positive, and with the enthusiasm of its current participants, the ASIL has built a strong, inter-connected, and global network. It hopes to reach more even women for its 2017-18 program.  The new deadline for applications is Friday, August 18, 2017.

 

The Women in International Law Mentoring Program is the first of its kind in international law and is designed to foster the next generation of female international lawyers. The program connects experienced female international law professionals with female law students and new attorneys interested in professional development in the field of international law. Mentoring takes place locally, in a group setting, with a maximum of four mentees for every mentor. Mentors and mentees meet in person every other month during the course of an academic year to discuss topics and engage in activities designed to help junior women enter and be successful in the field of international law. Mentors will be provided with optional pre-planned meeting topics to structure meetings for their groups. Upon finishing the requirements of the one-year program, all participants receive a certificate of completion.

Here's a link to the blog post about the program on IntLawGrrls blog.

Here is a link to an ASIL video explaining the program.

 

And here's a link to the Application for the 2017-18 program.

 

Hat tip to Luli Hemmingsen,  WIL Mentoring Program Manager.

 

(mew)

August 12, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Deborah Enix-Ross to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

Deborah Enix-RossThe American Bar Association Section of International Law will present its Lifetime Achievement Award to former Section Chair Deborah Enix-Ross. The event will take place during the Section of International Law Dinner being held on Friday during the Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association.

Deborah Enix-Ross is a Senior Advisor to Debevoise & Plimpton’s International Dispute Resolution practice. She is currently serving as Chair of the American Bar Association’s House of Delegates for the 2016 - 2018 term. The position is the second-highest office within the ABA, one of the world’s largest voluntary professional organizations, with nearly 400,000 members and more than 3,500 entities.

Ms. Enix-Ross joined Debevoise in 2002. She received her J.D. from the University of Miami School of Law in 1981, a Diploma in Comparative Law from the Parker School of Foreign and Comparative Law of Columbia University in 1989, and a Certificate in International Law from the London School of Economics in 1979.

Congratulations to Deborah Enix-Ross and the ABA Section of International Law.

(mew)

 

August 10, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 7, 2017

Fionnuala Ní Aoláin Appointed Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms while Countering Terrorism.

Fionnuala-ni-aolainThe United Nations Human Rights Council has appointed Professor Fionnuala Ní Aoláin of the University of Minnesota as the U.N.’s Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms while Countering Terrorism.

In this role, Ní Aoláin will be charged with making recommendations on safeguarding human rights while countering terrorism and, at the request of states, providing advisory services or technical assistance on such matters; investigating and reporting on alleged violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms; identifying and promoting best practices on counterterrorism measures that respect human rights and fundamental freedoms; and reporting regularly to the Human Rights Council and the U.N. General Assembly, among other duties. The appointment has a three-year term. She will continue her full-time teaching and research at the University of Minnesota while serving as Special Rapporteur.

Ní Aoláin’s involvement with the United Nations dates back to 2003, when she was appointed by the secretary-general as Special Expert on promoting gender equality in times of conflict and peacemaking. She also consults regularly with U.N. Women and the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, as well as the Council of Europe, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the U.K. Department of International Development, and numerous domestic and international NGOs.

Click here to read more.

Hat tip to June Carbone, Robina Chair of Law, Science, and Technology at the University of Minnesota Law School.

(mew)

August 7, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Pledge to Support the Equal Representation of Women in International Arbitration

You can sign the following pledge as an individual or organization to support the equal representation of women in international arbitral proceedings. Visit the arbitration pledge website to learn more and to sign the pledge for equality. There were 1,890 signatures as of August 7, 2017.

(mew)

As a group of counsel, arbitrators, representatives of corporates, states, arbitral institutions, academics and others involved in the practice of international arbitration, we are committed to improving the profile and representation of women in arbitration. In particular, we consider that women should be appointed as arbitrators on an equal opportunity basis. To achieve this, we will take the steps reasonably available to us – and we will encourage other participants in the arbitral process to do likewise – to ensure that, wherever possible:
  • committees, governing bodies and conference panels in the field of arbitration include a fair representation of women;
  • lists of potential arbitrators or tribunal chairs provided to or considered by parties, counsel, in-house counsel or otherwise include a fair representation of female candidates;
  • states, arbitral institutions and national committees include a fair representation of female candidates on rosters and lists of potential arbitrator appointees, where maintained by them;
  • where they have the power to do so, counsel, arbitrators, representatives of corporates, states and arbitral institutions appoint a fair representation of female arbitrators;
  • gender statistics for appointments (split by party and other appointment) are collated and made publicly available; and
  • senior and experienced arbitration practitioners support, mentor/sponsor and encourage women to pursue arbitrator appointments and otherwise enhance their profiles and practice.

August 7, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 3, 2017

UNAIDS Report Shows Increased Access to Treatment and a Decrease in AIDS-Related Deaths

UNAIDS released a report on July 20, 2017 showing that for the first time the scales have tipped: more than half of all people living with HIV (53%) now have access to HIV treatment and AIDS-related deaths have almost halved since 2005. In 2016, 19.5 million of the 36.7 million people living with HIV had access to treatment, and AIDS-related deaths have fallen from 1.9 million in 2005 to 1 million in 2016. Provided that scale-up continues, this progress puts the world on track to reach the global target of 30 million people on treatment by 2020.

“We met the 2015 target of 15 million people on treatment and we are on track to double that number to 30 million and meet the 2020 target,” said Michel Sidibé, Executive Director of UNAIDS. “We will continue to scale up to reach everyone in need and honour our commitment of leaving no one behind.”

The region showing the most progress is eastern and southern Africa, which has been most affected by HIV and which accounts for more than half of all people living with HIV. Since 2010, AIDS-related deaths have declined by 42%. New HIV infections have declined by 29%, including a 56% drop in new HIV infections among children over the same period, a remarkable achievement resulting from HIV treatment and prevention efforts that is putting eastern and southern Africa on track towards ending its AIDS epidemic.

The report, Ending AIDS: progress towards the 90–90–90 targets, gives a detailed analysis of progress and challenges towards achieving the 90–90–90 targets. The targets were launched in 2014 to accelerate progress so that, by 2020, 90% of all people living with HIV know their HIV status, 90% of all people with diagnosed HIV are accessing sustained antiretroviral therapy and 90% of all people accessing antiretroviral therapy are virally suppressed.

The report shows that in 2016 more than two thirds (70%) of people living with HIV now know their HIV status. Of the people who know their status, 77% were accessing treatment, and of the people accessing treatment, 82% were virally supressed, protecting their health and helping to prevent transmission of the virus.

Eastern and southern Africa, western and central Europe and North America and Latin America are on track to reach the 90–90–90 targets by 2020. In eastern and southern Africa, 76% of people living with HIV know their HIV status, 79% of people who know their HIV-positive status have access to antiretroviral therapy and 83% of people who are on treatment have undetectable levels of HIV—this equates to 50% of all people living with HIV in eastern and southern Africa with viral suppression. The Caribbean and Asia and the Pacific can also reach the 90–90–90 targets if programmes are further accelerated.

Seven countries have already achieved the 90–90–90 targets—Botswana, Cambodia, Denmark, Iceland, Singapore, Sweden and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland—and many more are close to achieving it.

“Ending AIDS is possible - it is a shared engagement and aspiration. One that cities can lead while promoting inclusive societies for all,” said Anne Hidalgo, Mayor of Paris.

The most significant impact of 90–90–90 scale-up has been in reducing AIDS-related deaths, which have been reduced by almost half in the past 10 years. As a result, life expectancy has increased significantly in the most affected countries. In eastern and southern Africa, life expectancy increased by nearly 10 years from 2006 to 2016.

Progress against the 90–90–90 targets has, however, been poor in the Middle East and North Africa and in eastern Europe and central Asia, where AIDS-related deaths have risen by 48% and 38%, respectively. There are exceptions within these regions showing that when concerted efforts are made, results happen. For example, Algeria has increased HIV treatment access from 24% in 2010 to 76% in 2016, Morocco from 16% in 2010 to 48% in 2016 and Belarus from 29% in 2010 to 45% in 2016.

Globally, progress has been significant, but there is still more work to do. Around 30% of people living with HIV still do not know their HIV status, 17.1 million people living with HIV do not have access to antiretroviral therapy and more than half of all people living with HIV are not virally suppressed.

In 2016 an estimated:

  • 19.5 million people were accessing antiretroviral therapy.
  • 36.7 million [30.8 million–42.9 million] people globally were living with HIV.
  • 1.8 million [1.6 million–2.1 million] people became newly infected with HIV.
  • 1.0 million [830 000–1.2 million] people died from AIDS-related illnesses.

The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) leads and inspires the world to achieve its shared vision of zero new HIV infections, zero discrimination and zero AIDS-related deaths. UNAIDS unites the efforts of 11 UN organizations—UNHCR, UNICEF, WFP, UNDP, UNFPA, UNODC, UN Women, ILO, UNESCO, WHO and the World Bank—and works closely with global and national partners towards ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 as part of the Sustainable Development Goals.

(mew) (adapted from a UNAIDS Press Release)

August 3, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Law Library of Congress Seminar on Free Legal Research - Register by August 4th for the Program on August 11th

The American Bar Association Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress, in cooperation with the ABA Section of International Law and other entities, will offer a free CLE legal research program during the upcoming ABA Annual Meeting in New York. The program will be on Friday, August 11, 2017 from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. on "How to Conduct Free Legal Research Online." This complimentary CLE program is being graciously hosted by Duane Morris LLP, 14th Floor Boardroom, 1540 Broadway, New York.

TO ATTEND, YOU MUST RSVP BY AUGUST 4, 2017 to to jinny.choi@americanbar.org.

The Law Library of Congress is the world's largest law library, and this 2-hour program will share with you many of the features of the LLOC that you'll be able to access from almost anywhere in the world. The program also will include instruction on free international and comparative law legal research. It's sure to be a sell-out program (especially at this price). If you register and cannot attend, please let Jinny Choi know in case there is a waiting list.

(mew)

August 1, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

ASIL Women in International Law Mentoring Program - Application Deadline Extended to August 18, 2017

The American Society of International Law (ASIL) and its Women in International Law Interest Group (WILIG) has extended the application deadline for its its fifth year of the Women in International Law Mentoring Program. Since 2013, over 420 women have enrolled in ASIL's Mentoring Program as both mentors and mentees in 10 countries and 28 cities from Tucson to Singapore. The feedback has been extremely positive, and with the enthusiasm of its current participants, the ASIL has built a strong, inter-connected, and global network. It hopes to reach more even women for its 2017-18 program.  The new deadline for applications is Friday, August 18, 2017.

 

The Women in International Law Mentoring Program is the first of its kind in international law and is designed to foster the next generation of female international lawyers. The program connects experienced female international law professionals with female law students and new attorneys interested in professional development in the field of international law. Mentoring takes place locally, in a group setting, with a maximum of four mentees for every mentor. Mentors and mentees meet in person every other month during the course of an academic year to discuss topics and engage in activities designed to help junior women enter and be successful in the field of international law. Mentors will be provided with optional pre-planned meeting topics to structure meetings for their groups. Upon finishing the requirements of the one-year program, all participants receive a certificate of completion.

Here's a link to the blog post about the program on IntLawGrrls blog.

Here is a link to an ASIL video explaining the program.

 

And here's a link to the Application for the 2017-18 program.

 

Hat tip to Luli Hemmingsen,  WIL Mentoring Program Manager.

 

(mew)

 

August 1, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

ASIL/WILIG Mentoring Program Seeking Participants

The American Society of International Law (ASIL) and its Women in International Law Interest Group (WILIG) has extended the application deadline for its its fifth year of the Women in International Law Mentoring Program. Since 2013, over 420 women have enrolled in ASIL's Mentoring Program as both mentors and mentees in 10 countries and 28 cities from Tucson to Singapore. The feedback has been extremely positive, and with the enthusiasm of our current participants, we have built a strong, inter-connected, and global network. We hope to reach more women for the 2017-18 program!  The new deadline for applications is Friday, August 18, 2017. Applications may be found here.

The Women in International Law Mentoring Program is the first of its kind in international law and is designed to foster the next generation of female international lawyers. The program connects experienced female international law professionals with female law students and new attorneys interested in professional development in the field of international law. Mentoring takes place locally, in a group setting, with a maximum of four mentees for every mentor. Mentors and mentees meet in person every other month during the course of an academic year to discuss topics and engage in activities designed to help junior women enter and be successful in the field of international law. Mentors will be provided with optional pre-planned meeting topics to structure meetings for their groups. Upon finishing the requirements of the one-year program, all participants receive a certificate of completion.

(cgb)

August 1, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 31, 2017

Bhutan Opens its First Law School

At a formal ceremony attended by many dignataries, the Jigme Singye Wangchuck School of Law (JSW Law) in Bhutan presented its first batch of 25 students at its temporary academic campus at Taba, Thimphu on Saturday, July 29, 2017.

The ceremony marked the start of the five-year undergraduate programme in law and the completion of the bridging course that began on July 3, 2017. The Class of 2022 consists of 25 students, who were selected from 499 applicants. The students were chosen according to a process that included of their Grade XII BCSEA national examinations, their score on a custom-designed law school admission test (LSAT), and their score in a personal interview with members of the JSW Law faculty.

There are 13 women and 12 men in the class and they hail from 15 of Bhutan's twenty Dzongkhags. They also represent 19 of Bhutan's 58 Higher Secondary Schools and Central Schools.

The formal opening ceremony was graced by the Law School’s Honorable President, HRH Princess Sonam Dechan Wangchuck. Guests included the Venerable Vairochana Rimpoche and Yonten Lopon, members of the Law School’s Governing Council, officials from the Royal Government of Bhutan, and foreign dignitaries and donors.

The students were presented to the Honorable President, followed by Zhudrey Puensum Tshogpa. The event concluded with Tashi Lebey and the blessing of the campus by the Vairochana Rimpoche.

Upon the Royal Command of His Majesty The King, the nation’s first law school, JSW Law, was founded as an independent, autonomous tertiary educational institution. His Majesty granted the Royal Charter for the institution on February 21, 2015, envisioning JSW Law as a world-class law school that promotes Bhutanese culture, traditions, and customs and complements wider efforts to develop long-term legal capacity and institutions in the Kingdom of Bhutan. JSW Law is supported by the Royal Government of Bhutan, the Government of India, the international law firm White & Case LLP, the U.S.-based Karuna Foundation, and the Austrian Development Agency. The U.S.-based Fulbright Commission has also sent two Fulbright specialists to the campus.

(Adapted from a JSW Law School Press Release).

July 31, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Deadline for Submissions Extended One Week - ASIL Midwest Research Forum

The American Society of International Law (ASIL) Midwest Interest Group is hosting its fourth annual research forum at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in Cleveland, Ohio on September 15-16, 2017. The goal is to create a friendly, open conversation about works in progress and to foster a Midwestern United States international law community. To that end, the workshop will include both full drafts and early works in progress.  We have received several very interesting submissions, but still have room for a couple more presenters.  Therefore, we have extended the deadline for submissions for one week to August 7, 2017

Those interested in presenting at the conference should send a 500-word abstract to ASIL-Midwest Co-Chair Cindy Buys at Southern Illinois University Law School by August 7. Please also include a sentence about the stage the paper is expected to be in by September (e.g., reasonably complete draft, early work in progress, etc.). Papers may address any International Law topics, and this Call for Submissions is open to everyone in the international legal community. Preference will be given to ASIL members who are also members of the ASIL-Midwest Interest Group. Paper presenters will be asked to circulate their drafts (or a summary of the project if it's early stage) to workshop attendees no later than September 1, 2017.

Those interested in serving as a commentator for a paper should also send an email to the Co-Chair Cindy Buys by August 7. Commentators will be asked to prepare five to eight minutes of comments on one or more of the papers. Those interested in presenting are also encouraged to comment on the other papers and should indicate whether they are willing to serve as commentators as well.

ASIL members and Cleveland-Marshall College of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or Cleveland-Marshall College of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. More details regarding transportation, hotels and other logistics will be provided shortly.

(cgb)

July 31, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Call for Submissions for the ASIL Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

The American Society of International Law (ASIL) Midwest Interest Group is hosting its fourth annual research forum at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in Cleveland, Ohio on September 15-16, 2017. The goal is to create a friendly, open conversation about works in progress and to foster a Midwestern United States international law community. To that end, the workshop will include both full drafts and early works in progress.  

Those interested in presenting at the conference should send a 500-word abstract to ASIL-Midwest Co-Chair Cindy Buys at Southern Illinois University Law School by Friday, July 28, 2017. Please also include a sentence about the stage the paper is expected to be in by September (e.g., reasonably complete draft, early work in progress, etc.). Papers may address any International Law topics, and this Call for Submissions is open to everyone in the international legal community. Preference will be given to ASIL members who are also members of the ASIL-Midwest Interest Group. Paper presenters will be asked to circulate their drafts (or a summary of the project if it's early stage) to workshop attendees no later than September 1, 2017.

Those interested in serving as a commentator for a paper should also send an email to the Co-Chair Cindy Buys by July 28. Commentators will be asked to prepare five to eight minutes of comments on one or more of the papers. Those interested in presenting are also encouraged to comment on the other papers and should indicate whether they are willing to serve as commentators as well.

ASIL members and Cleveland-Marshall College of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or Cleveland-Marshall College of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. More details regarding transportation, hotels and other logistics will be provided shortly.

(cgb)

July 19, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Save the Dates! Upcoming ABA International Conferences

The American Bar Association Section of International Law, with more than 20,000 members around the world, has some of the most interesting and productive conferences you'll find. Here's a list of upcoming events. Visit the ABA Section of International Law website for more information on any particular conference or forum.

   
Oct 20-22, 2017: Pre-Fall Conference Module (San Juan, Puerto Rico)
Oct 24-28, 2017: Section of International Law Fall Conference (Miami, Florida)
Jan 31-Feb 6, 2018: ABA/Section Midyear Meeting (Vancouver, Canada)
April 17-21, 2018: Section of International Law Annual Conference (New York City)
June 10-12, 2018: Europe Forum (Copenhagen, Denmark)

(mew)

July 11, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 10, 2017

Having Ivanka Trump Sitting at the G-20 Negotiation Table Between British Prime Minister Theresa May and Chinese President Xi Jinping was wrong, wrong, wrong.

When U.S. President Donald Trump was at the G-20 summit in Germany, he had his daughter Ivanka sit in for him at the negotiating table. Can you imagine the outrage if any world leader from the other countries in the G-20 got up from the table to be replaced by their son or daughter? This is not done. At a minimum, this sends confusing messages to other world leaders about who is in power in the country. Having Ivanka Trump sitting between British Prime Minister Theresa May and Chinese President Xi Jinping was wrong, wrong, wrong. The correct protocol would have been to have the U.S. Secretary of State take his place at the negotiating table, not his daughter.

Or he could have stayed at the negotiating table, as the other world leaders did.

It was also wrong of Donald Trump to refer to Xi Jinping as the President of Taiwan. This was a great embarrassment for the United States and for the People's Republic of China.

As for the summit itself, a headline from the front page of The Washington Post from July 9, 2017 captures it best: Summit Exposes Trump's Isolation -- Leaders Express Anxiety at G-20 -- Defiance of Climate Pact Threatens Global Alliances.

(mew)

July 10, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Immigration Law Update for Employment Lawyers and Corporate Counsel

The International Law Committee of the American Bar Association Tort Trial and Insurance Practice Section (TIPS)  has partnered with the Employment and Law Committee on an upcoming Audio Webinar scheduled for July 25th, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. EST  - "Immigration Law Update for Employment Lawyers and Corporate Counsel."  

This webinar will be beneficial for any attorney advising business segments, employers, or foreign nationals on hiring and compliance issues involving immigration law. Attendees will be provided with an overview of the Immigration Reform and Control Act and requirements imposed on employers and foreign nationals by immigration laws. 

Registration and further information about the program can be found by clicking here

Hat tip to Stacey H. Wang.

(mew)

July 9, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Washburn is Hiring an Assistant Director of Academic Support and Bar Readiness.

The Washburn University School of Law invites applications for the position of Assistant Director of Academic Support and Bar Readiness. This is a full-time, twelve-month, nontenure-track position designed to support the Director of Academic Support and Bar Readiness.  (The official job posting can be found by clicking here).

  • With respect to the Academic Support program this position will support and/or teach in academic success courses, work one-on-one with students on academic probation or at academic risk to help them develop habits and methods to improve their academic performance, and design and implement periodic assessments of academic support programs to identify program facets that offer opportunities for continuous improvement.
  • With respect to the Bar Readiness program, this position’s duties include coordinating and providing instruction during the winter and summer bar preparation initiatives, coaching and supporting students and alumni as they prepare for the bar exams, offering active learning workshops on bar essay writing and on multiple choice test taking skills, and reading and critiquing student practice essays.

The Washburn campus is located in the heart of Topeka, Kansas, blocks from the state capitol. Recently, the Topeka and Shawnee County Library was named the 2016 Library of the Year, the highest honor for libraries in the U.S. and Canada. Topeka has previously been named a Top Ten City in Kiplinger’s magazine. Topeka features affordable housing and beautiful, historic neighborhoods filled with well-maintained parks. It is also the home of the Brown v. Board of Education historical site.

Required Qualifications: Juris Doctor degree from an ABA approved law school, with a strong academic record, and successful completion of a bar exam. Background demonstrating a potential for excellence in academic support. Understanding of legal pedagogy including current trends. Strong oral presentation skills and ability to remediate complex legal rules. Excellent written communication and legal writing skills. Ability to manage multiple tasks and meet deadlines. Demonstrated ability to work with a diverse student body and work collaboratively with faculty and staff. Proficiency with Microsoft Excel and PowerPoint. Must have passed a state or uniform bar exam and hold a current license to practice law.

Preferred Qualifications: Experience running a law school academic support program or other relevant teaching or tutoring experience. Law practice experience. Experience using TWEN, D2L, and Banner.

Application Procedures: Submit a letter of interest, resume, Resume Supplement form (available at //www.washburn.edu/hrforms), copy of unofficial transcript(s) for highest level of postsecondary education (official transcript for all levels of postsecondary education may be requested upon hire), and names and phone numbers of three professional references to getajob@washburn.edu or to Washburn University Human Resources, 118 Morgan Hall, 1700 SW College, Topeka, Kansas 66621. Applicants are encouraged to submit complete applications by July 17, 2017. Applications will continue to be reviewed until interviews are scheduled.  

Salary is upper $60,000 to lower $70,000 commensurate with qualifications. Washburn provides an excellent fringe benefits package. Employment at Washburn University will be conditioned upon satisfactory completion of a background check.

Hat tip to Associate Dean Joseph Mastrosimone.

(mew)

July 9, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 3, 2017

First Law School in Bhutan Opens Today

Congratulations to the Jigme Singye Wangchuck School of Law, the first law school in the history of the Kingdom of Bhutan. The law school is welcoming 25 fortunate law students from all across Bhutan. They begin their orientation classes today, Monday, July 3, 2017.
Opening the first law school in any country is a tremendous accomplishment. Special congratulations to the visionary Bhutanese leaders and lawyers who are supporting this new school, and to Michael Peil and Judy Stark, who have devoted several years to making this special day possible.
For those of you who would like to know  more about the school, the New York Times did a story about the law school back in October 2016.
The law school's website is www.jswlaw.bt
(mew)

 

July 3, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (1)