Friday, August 14, 2015

Central American Deportation Cases Dominate Immigration Courts

Central americans

Persons from Central America continue to outnumber those from Mexico when DHS seeks deportation orders in Immigration Court, according to the latest government data obtained by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC). During the first ten months of fiscal year 2015, 42 percent of DHS filings involved individuals from Central America, primarily Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. This figure is up from 25 percent three years ago in fiscal year 2012.

However, the proportion of individuals from Central American countries involved in Immigration Court cases has been quite variable. Ten years ago, cases from Central America also surpassed the numbers from Mexico. Over the last decade they have ranged from a low of 19 percent during FY 2009-2011 to a high of 56 percent just last year. Figure 1 shows the changing year-to-year composition of DHS Immigration Court filings involving persons from Mexico versus those from Central America.

KJ

August 14, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

From the Bookshelves: Dream Things True: A Novel by Marie Marquardt

 

Dreams thing true

Dream Things True:  A Novel by Marie Marquardt

Evan and Alma have spent fifteen years living in the same town, connected in a dozen different ways but also living worlds apart—until the day he jumps into her dad’s truck and slams on the brakes. The nephew of a senator, Evan seems to have it all—except a functional family. Alma has lived in Georgia since she was two, surrounded by a large – and sometimes smothering – Mexican family. They both want out of this town. His one-way ticket is soccer; hers is academic success. When they fall in love, they fall hard, trying to ignore their differences. Then Immigration and Customs Enforcement begins raids in their town, and Alma knows that she needs to share her secret. But how will she tell her country-club boyfriend that she and almost everyone she’s close to are undocumented immigrants? What follows is a page-turning debut that asks tough questions, reminding us that love is more powerful than fear.

KJ

August 14, 2015 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Unauthorized Immigrants Paid $100 Billion Into Social Security Over Last Decade

VICE News reports that unauthorized workers are paying an estimated $13 billion a year in social security taxes and only getting around $1 billion back, according to a senior government statistician.  The Social Security Administration estimates that unauthorized workers have paid a whopping $100 billion into the fund over the past decade. Yet as these people are in the US unlawfully, it is unlikely that they will be able to benefit from their contributions later in life.

KJ

August 13, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

A Modern Romeo and Juliet? An Australian Couple Town Apart by the Immigration Laws

DHS Inspector General: No Evidence of Deliberate Violation of Injunction in Texas v. United States

Substantive Due Process for Noncitizens: Lessons from Obergefell by Anthony O'Rourke

Anthony

Substantive Due Process for Noncitizens: Lessons from Obergefell by Anthony O. RourkeState University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo, SUNY Buffalo Law School August 3, 2015

ABSTRACT:  The state of Texas denies birth certificates to children born in the United States — and thus citizens under the Fourteenth Amendment — if their parents are undocumented immigrants with identification provided by their home countries’ consulates. What does this have to do with same-sex marriage? In a previous article, I demonstrated that the Court’s due process analysis in United States v. Windsor is particularly relevant to the state’s regulation of undocumented immigrants. This short essay builds upon my earlier analysis by examining United States v. Obergefell’s applications outside the context of same-sex marriage. Obergefell’s due process holding, I argue, can serve to clarify the constitutional harms that result from policies, like those in Texas, that selectively target noncitizens and their children.

Michigan Law Review First Impressions, Forthcoming

KJ

August 13, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Immigrant of the Day: Google's New CEO, Sundar Pichai

From the Bookshelves: Crimmigration Law by Author: César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández

Crimmigration

 

 Crimmigration Law by Author: César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández

At its most basic, “crimmigration” law describes the convergence of two distinct bodies of law: criminal law and procedure with immigration law and procedure. For most of the nation’s history, these operated almost entirely free of the other. Criminal law and procedure was thought to be the province of prosecutors, criminal defense attorneys, and the state and federal judges who oversee criminal prosecutions every day. Immigration law, in contrast, was confined to immigration courts housed within the executive branch of the federal government and staffed by immigration attorneys, immigration judges, and prosecutors employed for many years by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and now the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

With this in mind, Crimmigration Law lays out crimmigration law’s contours. It tracks the legal developments that have created crimmigration law and explains the many ways in which the stark line that once appeared to keep criminal law firmly divided from immigration law has melted away. In doing so, it highlights crimmigration law’s most salient features—its ability to substantially raise the stakes of criminal prosecutions by dramatically expanding the list of crimes that can result in removal from the United States, its willingness to freely rely on crimes that apply only to migrants, and its vast dependence on detention as a means of policing immigration law.

Crimmigration law is simply too new to have gained widespread recognition until the last few years. Several recent law enforcement trends and judicial decisions, including U.S. Supreme Court cases, have drastically changed the legal landscape such that, today, crimmigration is developing into a distinct field of law and a palpable feature of law enforcement in communities throughout the country.

This book is intended to provide readers with a fundamental understanding of this developing area of law. It includes case studies and “problem scenarios” that place the concepts discussed within each chapter in a real-world context in addition to “practice pointers” designed to give crimmigration lawyers and students of crimmigration law tips and techniques to help them implement the tools into their daily practice.

With its comprehensive yet accessible approach, Crimmigration Law is the first book of its kind. 

KJ

August 13, 2015 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

In-Country Refugee Processing in Central America: A Piece of the Puzzle

In country

As an element of the U.S. government’s response to a surge in migration of unaccompanied minors from Central America, the Obama administration in December 2014 established an in-country refugee processing program for minors in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras who have parents living lawfully in the United States.

The Central American Minors (CAM) Refugee/Parole Program was designed to provide a legal, safe alternative to the dangerous, unauthorized journeys that many thousands of unaccompanied children have taken in hopes of reaching the United States.

A new Migration Policy Institute (MPI) report, In-Country Refugee Processing in Central America: A Piece of the Puzzle, offers an analysis of the CAM program, which as of mid-August had received 3,344 applications. The vast majority of applicants are from El Salvador, with smaller numbers from Honduras and Guatemala.

The report, written by MPI Associate Policy Analyst Faye Hipsman and Senior Fellow Doris Meissner, who heads the Institute’s U.S. immigration policy program, also examines the history of U.S. in-country processing programs. The CAM program is the latest in a series of in-country processing initiatives that began in 1979, in response to wars, humanitarian crises, and periods of political repression. Vietnam, Haiti, Cuba, states in Eurasia and the Baltics, and Iraq, are among the countries in which the United States has used in-country processing as a component of the U.S. refugee admissions system.

In-country programs have typically been controversial. The report finds that their success turns on key factors such as admissions criteria, how the application process is structured, the speed of adjudication, and whether applicants can be adequately protected during the application process.
Though still in its early days of implementation, the CAM program may provide an alternative to the dangerous journeys that some unaccompanied minors undertake across Central America and Mexico. “But it is not likely to do so at a scale that can significantly reduce child migrant flows to the United States at this time,” the authors conclude. 
 

KJ

August 13, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

More Debate Over Foreign Home Buyers

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper recently announced plans to track foreign home buyers in Canada and, perhaps, to impose limitations on the purchase of Canadian real estate by non-nationals. His concerns: inflated real estate prices and empty residences.


Harper, photo by Alex Guibord

As I've mentioned before, controversy surrounding the purchase of real estate by foreign nationals isn't limited to Canada. The UK has faced its own concerns about "hollowed out" neighborhoods bought out by foreign investors and left uninhabited.

Parts of the United States (principally NYC) have seen upticks in the purchase of real estate by foreign investors, including through the EB-5 program. Yet I've see no reports of such investments leading to swaths of uninhabited neighborhoods. 

Fears over foreign nationals acquiring real estate change over time. During the U.S. housing collapse, some legislators explicitly sought to entice foreign nationals to purchase U.S. homes in order to boost the flagging market. And back in the day, the United States offered land to foreigners willing to settle the wild west.

Time will tell whether PM Harper will be able to garner enough political support for his plans to track and potentially end the purchase of Canadian homes by foreigners. But I suspect it will be short lived.

-KitJ

August 13, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

DACA’s Third Anniversary Nears

Daca at three

The vast majority of unauthorized immigrants who received a temporary grant of relief from deportation as well as work authorization under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program have applied to renew their benefits as their initial two-year grant neared its end, the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) finds.

As the third anniversary of the DACA program approaches, a new analysis by MPI’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy finds that 83 percent, or 355,805, of the 430,396 DACA applicants eligible to renew their benefits had done so as of March 31, 2015. The Obama administration launched the DACA program on August 15, 2012, offering a two-year grant of relief from deportation and work authorization to qualified unauthorized immigrants brought to the United States as children and meeting length of residence, education and other requirements.

Overall, approximately 750,000 individuals had applied for DACA protection as of March 31—almost half of the nearly 1.6 million unauthorized immigrants ages 15 or older that MPI estimates are potentially eligible to apply. (MPI estimates another 423,000 under age 15 will be eligible to apply once they age in.)

The brief, DACA at the Three-Year Mark: High Pace of Renewals, But Processing Difficulties Evident, finds that even as most DACA participants are applying to renew their benefits as their initial grant nears its end date, the process has been hampered by processing delays within U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), confusion over the renewals process, lack of outreach and information and difficulties for some affording the $465 application fee. A further complication: confusion resulting from a legal challenge that has resulted in a federal judge temporarily halting the DACA expansions announced by President Obama in November 2014, which would extend the program to new populations and expand the eligibility period to three years. While the original DACA program remains in place and is not a subject of the legal challenge filed by 26 states, USCIS had to recall approximately 2,100 three-year DACA grants issued after a federal judge blocked the DACA expansions, replacing them with two-year grants.

To account for DACA renewal processing time, USCIS has asked DACA beneficiaries to file renewal applications 120 to 150 days before their current benefits expire. More than 65,000 renewals were given after the applicant’s DACA grant and employment authorization had expired, according to information USCIS provided in a Freedom of Information Act request filed by a news organization. While it is not possible to determine based on the USCIS data provided whether the 65,000 had all applied at least 120 days before their DACA grants lapsed, at least 11,023 had applied within their renewal window.

The brief notes the severe consequences that can face beneficiaries whose DACA grant and work authorization expire, whether as a result of processing delays or failure to file for renewal: accrual of unlawful presence, which can trigger bars on re-entry to the country should opportunities to apply for legal permanent residence occur in the future; and possible loss of employment, health insurance, driver’s licenses and the ability to apply for internships.

MPI today also launched updates to its online data tool offering estimates of the DACA-eligible population for the United States, 40 states and 100 counties with the largest potentially eligible populations, examining those who currently meet all DACA criteria, those who appear to meet all but the educational criteria and those who are under age 15 and could age into eligibility in the future.

The data tool also offers more detailed sociodemographic profiles of DACA-eligible populations for the United States, 32 states and 39 counties, including top countries and regions of origin, age, gender, educational attainment, English proficiency, top languages spoken at home, employment and income.

KJ

August 11, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Baseball Remains as American as Apple Pie? Home Grown Players Dominate MLB Hitting Leaders

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Courtesy of Wikipedia

There has been a fair amount written in recent years about Major League Baseball being dominated in the modern times by Latino ballplayers, many of them foreign-born.  But, according the to latest statistics from ESPN, 80 percent of the leading hitters at this point in the 2015 season are homegrown:

National League

1 Paul Goldschmidt ARI   .338           POB:  Wilmington, Deleware

2 Bryce Harper WSH         .333           POB:  Las Vegas, Nevada

3 Buster Posey SF               .332           POB:  Leesburg, Georgia

4 Gerardo Parra MIL         .328          POB:   Santa Barbara, Venezuela

5 Dee Gordon MIA              .326           POB:  Windermere, Florida

 

American League

 1 Jason Kipnis CLE             .326           POB:  Northbrook, Illinois

2 Prince Fielder TEX           .325           POB:  Ontario, California

3 Nelson Cruz SEA                .324           POB:  Monte Cristi, Dominican Republic

4 Eric Hosmer KC                  .318           POB:  South Miami, Florida

5 Michael Brantley CLE       .313           POB:  Bellevue, Washington

KJ

August 11, 2015 in Current Affairs, Sports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Removing Alien Terminology from the Law: California Governor Jerry Brown Signs Bill into Law

Jerry_Brown_portrait_(1984)

Portrait of Governor Jerry Brown

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a trio of immigration-related measures Monday, including one removing the word “alien” from California’s labor code because it is seen as disparaging.

Brown also signed into law legislation allowing noncitizens in high school to serve as election poll workers and protecting the rights of immigrant minors in civil lawsuits.

The bill banning “alien” is needed to modernize state labor law, in the same way many newspapers have stopped using the term “illegal alien,” said state Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia), author of the bill. “Alien is now commonly considered a derogatory term for a foreign-born person and has very negative connotations,” Mendoza said. “The United States is a country of immigrants who not only form an integral part of our culture and society, but are also critical contributors to our economic success.”

Mendoza’s measure amends a law enacted in 1937, a time when a number of states sought to regulate the employment of foreign workers, that said “aliens” should be hired on public-works contracts only after citizens of the United States. Part of that law was repealed in 1970, but the term “alien” remains in the labor code.For critical analysis of the use of the term "alien" in the U.S. immigration laws, click here.

Brown also signed legislation allowing high school students who are legal permanent residents to serve as poll workers in California elections, in part to help with translation needs in an increasingly diverse voting population.

Brown also signed a bill barring the consideration of a child's immigration status in civil actions involving liability. That measure, by Assemblyman Jimmy Gomez (D-Echo Park), is in response to a lawsuit on behalf of more than 80 elementary school children against the Los Angeles Unified School District over alleged sexual misconduct by a former teacher.

KJ

In 1937, the Legislature enacted various provisions regarding the employment of “aliens”, who are defined as any person who is not a born or fully naturalized citizen of the United State, and a provision which prescribes an order for the issuance of employment under specified public works contracts - first to citizens of the United States, second to citizens of other States in the United States, and third to aliens. The Legislature repealed most of these Labor Code sections in 1970. Unfortunately, the definition for “alien” and the order under which employment is to be given to “aliens” was not repealed and are still found in the Labor Code.

SB 432 deletes the term “alien” as a definition for an immigrant individual and the outdated requirement the law which prescribes an order for the issuance of employment under public works contracts to citizens and aliens.

Under current law, all employment protections, rights, and remedies available under state law, except as prohibited by federal law, are available to all individuals regardless of immigration status. (Labor Code §1171.5) Over the last few years, several bills have been passed and signed into law which has strengthened labor law protections for immigrant workers.

“The word “alien,” and any law prescribing an order for the issuance of employment to “aliens”, have no place in the laws of our state and more importantly, should never be the basis for any employment hiring. SB 432 deletes this outdated, discriminatory and unnecessary reference in state law,” said Senator Mendoza.

According to a study conducted by the Pew Research Center, the use of “illegal alien,” a term considered insensitive by many, reached its low point in 2013, dropping to 5% of terms used. It had consistently been in double digits in the other periods studied, peaking at 21% in 2007.

- See more at: http://sd32.senate.ca.gov/news/8102015-governor-brown-signs-bill-remove-term-%E2%80%9Calien%E2%80%9D-california-labor-code#sthash.XBx0P1BC.dpuf

Governor Jerry Brown today signed SB 432 by Senator Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia), Chair of the Senate Labor and Industrial Relations Committee. The bill modernizes outdated law by deleting the term “alien” from the California Labor Code, as a definition for an immigrant individual. The new law goes into effect on January 1, 2016.

“I applaud Governor Brown for signing SB 432. My bill modernizes the Labor Code and removes the term “alien” to describe a person who is not born in or a fully naturalized citizen of the United States,” said Senator Tony Mendoza. “Alien is now commonly considered a derogatory term for a foreign-born person and has very negative connotations.”

The United States is a country of immigrants who not only form an integral part of our culture and society, but are also critical contributors to our economic success. Immigrants work and pay taxes, create new products, businesses, and technologies and generate jobs for all Americans.

In 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were 25.3 million foreign-born persons in the U.S. labor force, comprising 16.3 percent of the total (Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Foreign-Born Workers: Labor Force Characteristics in 2013”). The BLS also found that foreign-born workers were more likely than native-born workers to be employed in service occupations.  Furthermore, the U.S. Department of Treasury notes that immigrants own 10.8 percent of all firms with employees, providing job opportunities for thousands of Americans. 

“California is among the top destination states for immigrants in the United States. Given the abundant evidence of their many contributions, it is imperative that any derogative references to foreign-born individuals be repealed from state law,” added Senator Mendoza. 

In 1937, the Legislature enacted various provisions regarding the employment of “aliens”, who are defined as any person who is not a born or fully naturalized citizen of the United State, and a provision which prescribes an order for the issuance of employment under specified public works contracts - first to citizens of the United States, second to citizens of other States in the United States, and third to aliens. The Legislature repealed most of these Labor Code sections in 1970. Unfortunately, the definition for “alien” and the order under which employment is to be given to “aliens” was not repealed and are still found in the Labor Code.

SB 432 deletes the term “alien” as a definition for an immigrant individual and the outdated requirement the law which prescribes an order for the issuance of employment under public works contracts to citizens and aliens.

Under current law, all employment protections, rights, and remedies available under state law, except as prohibited by federal law, are available to all individuals regardless of immigration status. (Labor Code §1171.5) Over the last few years, several bills have been passed and signed into law which has strengthened labor law protections for immigrant workers.

“The word “alien,” and any law prescribing an order for the issuance of employment to “aliens”, have no place in the laws of our state and more importantly, should never be the basis for any employment hiring. SB 432 deletes this outdated, discriminatory and unnecessary reference in state law,” said Senator Mendoza.

According to a study conducted by the Pew Research Center, the use of “illegal alien,” a term considered insensitive by many, reached its low point in 2013, dropping to 5% of terms used. It had consistently been in double digits in the other periods studied, peaking at 21% in 2007.

- See more at: http://sd32.senate.ca.gov/news/8102015-governor-brown-signs-bill-remove-term-%E2%80%9Calien%E2%80%9D-california-labor-code#sthash.XBx0P1BC.dpuf

August 11, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 10, 2015

Immigration Article of the Day: Immigration Reform and Administrative Relief for 2014 and Beyond: A Report on Behalf of the Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation (CIRI), Human Resources Working Group

 

Immigration Reform and Administrative Relief for 2014   and Beyond: A Report on Behalf of the Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation   (CIRI), Human Resources Working Group by Charles Kamasaki, Susan Timmons, and Courtney Tudi
   

Successful   implementation of any broad-scale immigrant legalization program requires an adequately funded infrastructure of immigrant-serving organizations. As the   initial Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program instituted in   2012 has already stretched the capacity of immigrant-serving organizations to their limits or even beyond them, the possibility of full implementation of   DAPA (Deferred Action for Parents of Citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents) and the expanded DACA programs presents a formidable challenge for these organizations. In this paper, the Human Resources Working Group of the Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation (CIRI) draws on the lessons of the Immigrant Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA), DACA, and other   initiatives to provide a roadmap for immigrant service delivery agencies and   their partners in planning for implementation of the expanded DACA and the DAPA   programs, with an eye (ultimately) to broad legislative reform. In particular, this paper focuses on the funding and human resources that the immigrant service delivery field, writ large, would require to implement these programs.

KJ

August 10, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Where Does Bernie Sanders Stand on Immigration? Campaign Website Does Not Say

330px-Bernie_Sanders_August_2015

Democratic Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has drawn large crowds on the campaign trail.  However, Black Lives Matter protesters disrupted an event in Seattle.  Sanders, whose campaign has focused on economic issues, recently added a position statement on racial justice on the campaign website.  On the website, however, Sanders fails to state a position on immigration, immigration enforcement, or immigration reform.  How can that be?  Sanders recently raised concerns in attacking "open borders" as a Koch brothers' conspiracy and stated that immigration might hurt American workers.  Earlier this summer, when questioned about his silence on the issue, Sanders voiced support for immigration reform.

Why is Bernie Sanders so quiet on immigration?  Shouldn't he at least have a brief statement of his position on immigration on his campaign website? 

KJ

August 10, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Is Team Trump DOA? How Many Gaffes Will It Take?

330px-Donald_Trump_March_2015

Despite the fact that it remains early in the 2016 primary season, celebrity presidential candidate Donald Trump has made for interesting headlines -- just for the groups that he has insulted.  So far, he has disparaged Latinos, Senator John McCain, and, most recently, women.

CNN has wondered aloud whether Trump will "survive" his latest antics;  "Now, finally, Donald Trump might have thrown cold water on his own white-hot summer surge to the top of the Republican presidential primary field. The real estate mogul's attacks on Fox News host Megyn Kelly, his steadfast decision to lash out at anybody who questioned him, and yet another high profile HR departure from his campaign has led some GOP operatives to predict that Trump will finally face a backlash from voters who have until now tolerated his bombastic comments out of an appreciation for his willingness to rage against the political machine."

 

KJ

August 10, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

From the Bookshelves: Sanctuary Practices in International Perspectives: Migration, Citizenship and Social Movements. Edited by Randy Lippert, Sean Rehaag

9781138789142

Sanctuary Practices in International Perspectives:  Migration, Citizenship and Social Movements.  Edited by Randy Lippert, Sean Rehaag

Sanctuary Practices in International Perspectives examines the diverse, complex, and mutating practice of providing sanctuary to asylum-seekers. The ancient tradition of church sanctuary underwent a revival in the late 1970s. Immigrants living without legal status and their supporters, first in the United Kingdom, and then in the US, Canada, and elsewhere in Europe, have resorted to sanctuary practices to avoid and resist arrest and deportation by state authorities. Sanctuary appeared amidst a dramatic rise in asylum-seekers arriving in Western countries and a simultaneous escalation in national and international efforts to discourage and control their arrival and presence through myriad means, including deportation. This collection of papers by prominent US, European, Canadian, and Japanese scholars is the first to place contemporary sanctuary practices in international, theoretical, and historical perspective. Moving beyond isolated case studies of sanctuary activities and movements, it reveals sanctuary as a far more complex, varied, theoretically-rich, and institutionally-adaptable set of practices.

For the table of contents, click here.

KJ

August 10, 2015 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 9, 2015

Staff Attorney Position Legal Aid Society – Employment Law Center

The Legal Aid Society – Employment Law Center (LAS-ELC), one of the preeminent organizations of its kind in the United States, seeks an attorney with substantial litigation experience to assume significant responsibility in impact and enforcement litigation and other advocacy efforts.  

The Staff Attorney will litigate employment and employment-related cases on behalf of low-wage workers, with an emphasis on national origin discrimination and immigrant rights.  The mission of the National Origin Program, which is carried out through its nationally-recognized Immigrant Workers’ Rights and Language Rights Projects, is to vindicate and expand the workplace rights of recent immigrants to the United States – particularly those who face exploitation on account of their immigrant status, or who have been unfairly denied equal employment opportunities because of their linguistic characteristics.  The Staff Attorney will be involved in all aspects of our program’s activities particularly in litigation, working on federal and state court cases from initial fact investigation through complaint drafting, motion practice, discovery, trial, and appellate work. The Staff Attorney may also assist in litigating cases in other LAS-ELC program areas.

Requirements: The position requires California Bar membership, a minimum of three years of progressively developing litigation responsibility in a relevant public interest organization or employment law firm; knowledge of federal and California employment law and court procedures; and excellent legal research and writing and oral advocacy skills.  Importantly, candidates must additionally possess a close familiarity with current law relevant to the rights of immigrant workers and, more generally, an awareness of and sensitivity to the social and policy issues that inform advocacy on their behalf.  The successful candidate also will be a creative problem solver, strategic thinker, and legal innovator.  And, the successful candidate must possess strong interpersonal skills, leadership and organizational abilities, and work collaboratively within teams as well as independently. 

Experience working with immigrant communities, and fluency or a high level of proficiency in Spanish, are strongly preferred.  A commitment to LAS-ELC’s mission is essential.

Compensation: The LAS-ELC offers salaries that are competitive in the Bay Area public interest law community.  Benefits include health plans, long-term disability and life insurance, 403(b) retirement plan with employer match, and a generous paid vacation and holidays.  The position will remain open until filled.  

To Apply: Interested candidates should submit a detailed cover letter with résumé, two legal writing samples, law school transcript, and three professional references to:

Staff Attorney Search Committee, Legal Aid Society - Employment Law Center Email:  jobs@las-elc.org or Fax:  (415)593-0096

The Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center is an equal employment opportunity employer.  Further information concerning the organization and its programs can be found at www.las-elc.org.

KJ

 

August 9, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 8, 2015

6 things Donald Trump doesn’t know about immigration

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Market Watch has a nice list of immigration facts for presidential candidate Donald Trump.

1. Myth: Immigrants commit more crime than Americans.

    Fact: Immigrants are less likely to be criminals than native-born Americans.

 

2. Myth: Immigrants take jobs away from American citizens.

    Fact: Most immigrants don’t compete directly with American citizens for jobs.

3. Myth: Immigrants drive down wages.

    Fact: Immigrant have different education levels and job skills than Americans

 

4. Myth: Illegal immigrants don't pay taxes.

    Fact: Illegal immigrants in the U.S. paid $11.84 billion in taxes in 2012.

 

5. Myth: Illegal immigrants exploit the U.S. welfare system.

    Fact: Illegal immigrants aren't eligible for federal benefit programs such as Social Security, Medicaid, and food stamps.

6. Myth: The U.S. doesn't need more immigrants.

    Fact: New immigrants will replenish the workforce as about 77 million baby boomers start reaching retirement age.

KJ

August 8, 2015 in Current Affairs, Film & Television | Permalink | Comments (0)

National Conference of State Legislatures 2015 Immigration Report

The National Conference of State Legislatures has released its 2015 Immigration Report

In the first half of 2015, enacted legislation related to immigration increased by 16 percent to 153 compared with 132 laws in 2014. The number of resolutions bounced back to 238 after last year’s sharp decline to 84.

Lawmakers in 46 states and Puerto Rico enacted 153 laws and 238 resolutions related to immigration, for a total of 391. An additional 10 bills were vetoed by governors and 20 are pending signatures.

Four states did not enact immigration-related legislation in the first half of 2015: Alaska, Massachusetts, North Carolina and Ohio.

The increase can be explained in part because every state was in regular session in 2015, unlike 2014 when five states were not in session.

Here are some interesting pieces of state immigration legislation. 

Delaware and Hawaii enacted legislation to give unauthorized immigrants driving privileges.

Rhode Island’s law states that homeless people have a right to services regardless of political or religious beliefs, immigration status, disability, gender, etc., and created a committee to regulate shelter services.

Maine and Utah clarified eligibility for general assistance of certain noncitizens.

California established a statewide director of immigrant integration. Minnesota created three ethnic councils: the Minnesota Council on Latino Affairs; Council for Minnesotans of African Heritage; and the Council on Asian-Pacific Minnesotans.

Seven states adopted resolutions seeking action from Congress or the administration. These include requesting support for comprehensive immigration reform (California, Nevada); action against illegal fishing (Louisiana, Texas); requesting an additional 25,000 refugee visas for displaced Iraqis (Michigan); restoration of federal health care for residents present under the compacts of free association (Hawaii); reimbursement to the state for the financial burden of securing the Mexico border (Texas); and alternatives to the detainment of immigrant families seeking asylum in this country (New Mexico). Other resolutions addressed refugee resettlement (South Carolina); genocide prevention and awareness month (Georgia); and a review of health and law enforcement policies related immigrant communities (Puerto Rico). E-Verify. Indiana required contractors to submit case verification numbers before work begins on a public work project. Texas mandated E-Verify for state agencies.

Hat tip to Cappy White!

KJ

August 8, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)