Monday, October 6, 2014

FROM THE BOOKSHELVES: Tom Syring and Susan Musarrat Akram, editors, Still Waiting for Tomorrow: The Law and Politics of Unresolved Refugee Crises

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Still Waiting for Tomorrow: The Law and Politics of Unresolved Refugee Crises by Tom Syring, Norwegian Immigration Appeals Board, and Susan Musarrat Akram, Boston University School of Law September 1, 2014 STILL WAITING FOR TOMORROW: THE LAW AND POLITICS OF UNRESOLVED REFUGEE CRISES, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Susan M. Akram and Tom Syring (eds.)

Abstract: This volume is particularly concerned with identifying the root causes of some of the longest-standing unresolved refugee situations in the world today, and addressing the particular political and legal tensions undermining solutions to them. The book discusses the well-known factors that create refugee flows: war and armed conflict, environmental change and natural disasters, statelessness and protection gaps. It examines why particular refugee flows are not resolved — or are not resolvable — even where the original factors creating the flows have been mitigated or have disappeared. It also scrutinizes how various national and international actors’ policies have contributed with their interventions, omissions, and legal provisions to either alleviating a simmering refugee situation, or to turning it into a protracted or large-scale crisis. The volume covers historical and contemporary refugee situations, including Burma, Congo (DRC), Iraq, Palestine, Somalia, Tibet, Vietnam, and West-Sahara. A table of contents, foreword, and introductory chapter is enclosed in full text.

KJ

October 6, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 2, 2014

From the Bookshelves: Extraordinary Rendition Paperback by Paul Batista

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Extraordinary Rendition Paperback by Paul Batista (2013 Fiction)

When Ali Hussein, suspected terrorist and alleged banker for Al Qaeda, is finally transported from Guantanamo Bay to the US mainland to stand trial, many are stunned when Byron Carlos Johnson, a pre-eminent lawyer and son of a high-profile diplomat, volunteers to represent him. On principle, Johnson thought he was merely defending a man unjustly captured through rendition and water-boarded illegally. But Johnson soon learns that there is much more at stake than one man's civil rights. Hussein's intimate knowledge of key financial transactions could lead to the capture of or the unabated funding of the world's most dangerous terror cells. This makes Hussein the target of corrupt US intelligence forces on one side, and ruthless international terrorists on the other, and puts Byron Carlos Johnson squarely in the crosshairs of both. Written by no-holds-barred attorney Paul Batista, Extraordinary Rendition excels not only as an action thriller, but as a sophisticated legal procedural as well. Smart. Fast. Heart-pounding. A legal thriller of the highest order.

KJ

October 2, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Immigrant of the Day: Ping Fu From China | Entrepreneur

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Ping Fu From China | Entrepreneur

Born during China’s Cultural Revolution, Ping Fu was imprisoned by government officials before she immigrated to the United States. In 1997, she co-founded Geomagic, a software company that pioneered 3D technologies to design and manufacture products at a lower cost than mass production. Since 2010, Ping has served on the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship board at the White House. She published a well-received memoir called Bend, Not Break in 2012. 

Index

KJ

September 28, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

From the Bookshelves: International Migration, U.S. Immigration Law and Civil Society: From the Colonial Era to the 113th Congress Edited by Leonir Mario Chiarello and Donald Kerwin

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The Scalabrini International Migration Network (SIMN) and the Center for Migration Studies of New York (CMS) have released a new book on US immigration flows, trends, law and civil society titled International Migration, U.S. Immigration Law and Civil Society: From the Colonial Era to the 113th Congress. It is the tenth in a series on international migration to and within the Americas. Earlier volumes have covered immigration policy and civil society in the Western Hemisphere and in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay and Peru. The series draws on contributions from leading scholars and practitioners in the field. Joseph Chamie, the former director of the United Nations Population Division and former editor of the International Migration Review, provides a magisterial overview of migration flows to and within the Americas over the last 525 years, with particular focus on the United States and the territory that became the United States. He also highlights several themes that weave through this long history. Charles Wheeler, a senior attorney and director of training and legal support for the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC), provides a concise and timely history of US immigration law and policy, starting in the colonial era and leading to the current impasse on immigration reform. Sara Campos, a freelance writer and the former director of the Asylum Program for the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights in San Francisco, writes a groundbreaking chapter on the growing role of civil society in the US immigrant communities and in the US immigration debate. All three chapters, as well as an introduction by Donald Kerwin, speak very directly to the US immigration debate.

Click here for a review of the book.

KJ

September 23, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 22, 2014

FROM THE BOOKSHELVES Sounds of Belonging: U.S. Spanish-language Radio and Public Advocacy by Dolores Ines Casillas

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Sounds of Belonging:  U.S. Spanish-language Radio and Public Advocacy by Dolores Ines Casillas

The last two decades have produced continued Latino population growth, and marked shifts in both communications and immigration policy. Since the 1990s, Spanish- language radio has dethroned English-language radio stations in major cities across the United States, taking over the number one spot in Los Angeles, Houston, Miami, and New York City. Investigating the cultural and political history of U.S. Spanish-language broadcasts throughout the twentieth century, Sounds of Belonging reveals how these changes have helped Spanish-language radio secure its dominance in the major U.S. radio markets. Bringing together theories on the immigration experience with sound and radio studies, Dolores Inés Casillas documents how Latinos form listening relationships with Spanish-language radio programming. Using a vast array of sources, from print culture and industry journals to sound archives of radio programming, she reflects on institutional growth, the evolution of programming genres, and reception by the radio industry and listeners to map the trajectory of Spanish-language radio, from its grassroots origins to the current corporate-sponsored business it has become. Casillas focuses on Latinos’ use of Spanish-language radio to help navigate their immigrant experiences with U.S. institutions, for example in broadcasting discussions about immigration policies while providing anonymity for a legally vulnerable listenership. Sounds of Belonging proposes that debates of citizenship are not always formal personal appeals but a collective experience heard loudly through broadcast radio.

KJ

September 22, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, September 20, 2014

At the Movies: San Francisco Immigrant Film Festival 2014

 

Check out the SF Immigrant Film Festival 2014.  Sit back and enjoy 3 Short Movie Marathons:

Saturday, Oct.4 at La Peña Cultural Center - Berkeley

Sun. Oct. 5 at Mission Cultural Center, MCCLA-San Francisco

Thursday, Oct. 9 at City College of San Francisco, Mission Campus

KJ

September 20, 2014 in Books, Film & Television | Permalink | Comments (0)

From the Bookshelves: Shaping Immigration News: A French-American Comparison by Rodney Benson

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Shaping Immigration News: A French-American Comparison. Rodney Benson. Cambridge University Press. 2014.

This book offers a comprehensive portrait of French and American journalists in action as they grapple with how to report and comment on one of the most important issues of our era. Drawing on interviews with leading journalists and analyses of an extensive sample of newspaper and television coverage since the early 1970s, Rodney Benson shows how the immigration debate has become increasingly focused on the dramatic, emotion-laden frames of humanitarianism and public order. Yet even in an era of global hypercommercialism, Benson also finds enduring French-American differences related to the distinctive societal positions, professional logics, and internal structures of their journalistic fields. In both countries, less commercialized media tend to offer the most in-depth, multi-perspective, and critical news. Benson challenges classic liberalism's assumptions about state intervention's chilling effects on the press, suggests costs as well as benefits to the current vogue in personalized narrative news, and calls attention to journalistic practices that can help empower civil society. This book offers new theories and methods for sociologists and media scholars and fresh insights for journalists, policy makers, and concerned citizens.

Here is a review.

KJ

September 20, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 15, 2014

Little Readers: Dancing Home by Alma Flor Ada and Gabriel M. Zubizarreta

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Cover Art via Alma Flor Ada

Dancing Home by Alma Flor Ada and Gabriel M. Zubizarreta is a book targeted to children ages 8-12.

It tells the tale of two young cousins: Margie, born in the United States, and Lupe, born in Mexico.  

When Lupe comes to live with Margie in California, it's a challenge. Margie's American identity is jeopardized by having her Spanish-speaking-only cousin at school, and Margie resents the closeness she sees between her Mexican-born parents and Lupe. Lupe, meanwhile, has her own struggles with school, her cousin, and her family.

The book does a tremendous job capturing the pain of separation, alienation, and loss associated with otherness. Its portrayal of the inner life of young girls is incredibly realistic.

All in all, two thumbs up. A great read for all immprof families. And, if you're so inclined, here's a link to reading questions in both English and Spanish.

-KitJ

September 15, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 11, 2014

From the Bookshelves: Patriots Debate: Contemporary Issues in National Security Law

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 Patriots Debate: Contemporary Issues in National Security Law

The book provides foundational knowledge, introducing current issues in national security law. Written by a “who’s who” in the field of national security law, including: John Yoo, Louis Fisher, and Stewart Baker, the book present a series of debates, organized by chapter, in which an author presents ideas in a short essay, and another offers a response.

Patriots Debate is an accessible book offering informed, educated legal reasoning enabling the reader to understand the foundational legal opinions, laws, policies and mores that form both US government policies, and the surrounding debates based on competing views of the Constitution, statutes, presidential directives, judicial decisions and history itself.

Complex national security issue are exaimined:

An exploration of terrorism interrogations

The government as internet protector

Targeted killing--In accordance with the rule of law Law and cyber war--the lessons of history

The future of military detention

KJ

September 11, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 8, 2014

From the Bookshelves: The Lotus and the Storm: A Novel by Lan Cao

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The Lotus and the Storm: A Novel by Lan Cao

Half a century after it began, the Vietnam War still has a hold on our national psyche. Lan Cao’s now-classic debut, Monkey Bridge, won her wide renown for “connecting . . . the opposite realities of Vietnam and America” (Isabel Allende). In her triumphant new novel, Cao transports readers back to the war, illuminating events central to twentieth-century history through the lives of one Vietnamese American family. Minh is a former South Vietnamese commander of the airborne brigade who left his homeland with his daughter, Mai. During the war, their lives became entwined with those of two Americans: James, a soldier, and Cliff, a military adviser. Forty years later, Minh and his daughter Mai live in a close-knit Vietnamese immigrant community in suburban Virginia. As Mai discovers a series of devastating truths about what really happened to her family during those years, Minh reflects upon his life and the story of love and betrayal that has remained locked in his heart since the fall of Saigon.

KJ

September 8, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 4, 2014

From the Bookshelves: What Every Lawyer Needs to Know About Immigration Law by Anna Williams Shavers, Jennifer Hermansky, Jill E Family, Lillian Katherine Kalmykov, William S Jordan III

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What Every Lawyer Needs to Know About Immigration Law by Anna Williams Shavers, Jennifer Hermansky, Jill E Family, Lillian Katherine Kalmykov, William S Jordan III

Sponsor: Section of Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice

Publisher: ABA Book Publishing

This practical guide provides legal practitioners with tips on issues that they may encounter when representing clients that may necessitate an examination of immigration-related issues.

Given the many ways in which immigration law can affect a single individual as well as as large corporation, most lawyers will encounter a client needing immigration law advice. Yet for the nonspecialist, immigration law can be daunting, particularly because it is governed by a complex mix of statutes, regulations, and federal and administrative court guidance - as well as by adjudicatory policies from multiple administrative agencies. Thus, it is important for lawyers to understand how best to spot immigration issues for clients, and when to involve an immigration attorney for assistance with a client. This book was written by immigration law specialists who insights, guidance, and practice tips can offer help in understanding these issues.

The book is meant to provide attorneys working in various areas of law with enough information to identify problematic immigration issues, counsel their clients accordingly and if the matter is advanced to know when to advise the client to consult with immigration counsel.  It will also introduce attorneys to the myriad of agencies involved in the immigration process.

KJ

September 4, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

From the Bookshelves: Migrants for Export How the Philippine State Brokers Labor to the World by Robyn Magalit Rodriguez

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Migrants for Export How the Philippine State Brokers Labor to the World by Robyn Magalit Rodriguez

Robyn Magalit Rodriguez investigates how and why the Philippine government transformed itself into what she calls a labor brokerage state, which actively prepares, mobilizes, and regulates its citizens for migrant work abroad. Drawing on ethnographic research of the Philippine government’s migration bureaucracy, interviews, and archival work, Rodriguez presents a new analysis of neoliberal globalization and its consequences for nation-state formation.

Migrant workers from the Philippines are ubiquitous to global capitalism, with nearly 10 percent of the population employed in almost two hundred countries. In a visit to the United States in 2003, Philippine president Gloria Macapagal Arroyo even referred to herself as not only the head of state but also “the CEO of a global Philippine enterprise of eight million Filipinos who live and work abroad.” Robyn Magalit Rodriguez investigates how and why the Philippine government transformed itself into what she calls a labor brokerage state, which actively prepares, mobilizes, and regulates its citizens for migrant work abroad. Filipino men and women fill a range of jobs around the globe, including domestic work, construction, and engineering, and they have even worked in the Middle East to support U.S. military operations. At the same time, the state redefines nationalism to normalize its citizens to migration while fostering their ties to the Philippines. Those who leave the country to work and send their wages to their families at home are treated as new national heroes. Drawing on ethnographic research of the Philippine government’s migration bureaucracy, interviews, and archival work, Rodriguez presents a new analysis of neoliberal globalization and its consequences for nation-state formation.

KJ

September 3, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

From the Bookshelves: Still Waiting for Tomorrow The Law and Politics of Unresolved Refugee Crises. Editors: Susan M. Akram, Tom Syring

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Still Waiting for Tomorrow The Law and Politics of Unresolved Refugee Crises.  Editors: Susan M. Akram, Tom Syring

This book focuses on the common features of protracted refugee situations. It is a critical examination of the reasons underlying the extended nature of those crises, as well as potential solutions to them. The book addresses war and armed conflict, environmental change and natural disasters, statelessness and protection gaps, among other elements, as common origins of refugee crises. It analyzes the root causes of some of the longest-standing unresolved refugee situations in the world today (including, but not limited to, the cases of Palestinians, Sahrawis, and Tibetans), addressing the particular political and legal tensions undermining solutions to them. The book comprises contributions from some of the leading scholars and practitioners in the field of international refugee, human rights and humanitarian law, and international relations.

KJ

September 2, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 1, 2014

Little Readers: Migrant by Maxine Trottier

Migrant by Maxine Trottier is a picture book for young children. It tells the story of a migrant family from the perspective of its youngest member. She feels like a bird, flying north for the spring and south every fall. She feels like a jackrabbit living in an abandoned burrow (the housing of previous migrants).

Interestingly, the end notes indicate that the story concerns German Mennonites, traveling between Mexico and Canada for work.

Migrant

-KitJ

September 1, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 29, 2014

Fom the Bookshelves: Living “Illegal”: The Human Face of Unauthorized Immigration by Marie Friedmann Marquardt, Timothy J. Steigenga, Philip J. Williams, Manuel A. Vásquez

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Living “Illegal”: The Human Face of Unauthorized Immigration by Marie Friedmann Marquardt, Timothy J. Steigenga, Philip J. Williams, Manuel A. Vásquez

A myth-busting account of the tragedies, tales of success, and ambiguities of undocumented immigration—the stories behind the overheated rhetoric in the news

“What Part of ‘Illegal’ Don’t You Understand?” —anti-immigrant protest sign

Today’s polarized debates over immigration revolve around a set of one-dimensional characters and unchallenged stereotypes. Yet the resulting policy prescriptions, not least of them Arizona’s draconian new law SB 1070, are dangerously real and profoundly counterproductive.

A major new antidote to this trend, Living “Illegal” is an ambitious new account of the least understood and most relevant aspects of the American immigrant experience today. Based on years of research into the lives of ordinary migrants, Living “Illegal” offers richly textured stories of real people—working, building families, and enriching their communities even as the political climate grows more hostile.

Moving far beyond stock images and conventional explanations, Living “Illegal” challenges our assumptions about why immigrants come to the United States, where they settle, and how they have adapted to the often confusing patchwork of local immigration ordinances. This revealing narrative takes us into Southern churches (which have quietly emerged as the only organizations open to migrants), into the fields of Florida, onto the streets of major American cities during the historic immigrant rights marches of 2006, and back and forth across different national boundaries—from Brazil to Mexico and Guatemala.

A deeply humane book, Living “Illegal” will stand as an authoritative new guide to one of the most pressing issues of our time.

KJ

August 29, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 28, 2014

From the Bookshelves: A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain by Robert Olen Butler

A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain is a Pulitzer-Prize winning collection of short stories by Robert Olen Butler, all of which concern Vietnamese immigrants in Louisiana. 

In my Immigration Law class, I use the following excerpts to illustrate the point that even quota-exempt family members are not entitled to automatic presence in the United States. The process for their entry can, in fact, be quite lengthy.

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-KitJ

August 28, 2014 in Books, Teaching Resources | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

From the Bookshelves: Binational Human Rights: The U.S.-Mexico Experience, William Paul Simmons and Carol Mueller, Editors

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Binational Human Rights: The U.S.-Mexico Experience, William Paul Simmons and Carol Mueller, Editors

Mexico ranks highly on many of the measures that have proven significant for creating a positive human rights record, including democratization, good health and life expectancy, and engagement in the global economy. Yet the nation's most vulnerable populations suffer human rights abuses on a large scale, such as gruesome killings in the Mexican drug war, decades of violent feminicide, migrant deaths in the U.S. desert, and the ongoing effects of the failed detention and deportation system in the States. Some atrocities have received extensive and sensational coverage, while others have become routine or simply ignored by national and international media. Binational Human Rights examines both well-known and understudied instances of human rights crises in Mexico, arguing that these abuses must be understood not just within the context of Mexican policies but in relation to the actions or inactions of other nations—particularly the United States.

The United States and Mexico share the longest border in the world between a developed and a developing nation; the relationship between the two nations is complex, varied, and constantly changing, but the policies of each directly affect the human rights situation across the border. Binational Human Rights brings together explain the mechanisms by which a perfect storm of structural and policy factors on both sides has led to such widespread human rights abuses.

Contributors: Alejandro Anaya Muñoz, Luis Alfredo Arriola Vega, Timothy J. Dunn, Miguel Escobar-Valdez, Clara Jusidman, Maureen Meyer, Carol Mueller, Julie A. Murphy Erfani, William Paul Simmons, Kathleen Staudt, Michelle Téllez.

William Paul Simmons is Associate Professor of Gender and Women's Studies at the University of Arizona and author of Human Rights Law and the Marginalized Other and An-Archy and Justice: An Introduction to Emmanuel Levinas's Political Thought.

Carol Mueller is Professor of Sociology and former Director of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. She is coeditor of Repression and Mobilization and Frontiers of Social Movement Theory, among other titles.

KJ

August 27, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Immigrant of the Day: Jhumpa Lahiri From England | Author

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Jhumpa Lahiri From England | Author

Lahiri-Jhumpa Photo courtesy of Random House Acclaimed author Jhumpa Lahiri was raised in the U.S. while also spending time with her extended family in India. Her fiction draws from these experiences, depicting the lives and conflicts of immigrant families in America. Her first book, Interpreter of Maladies, won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for fiction and the PEN/Heminway Award. Her second book, The Namesake, was a novel that was adapted into a film by Mira Nair in 2007. Her recent novel The Lowland was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Man Booker Prize.

KJ

August 24, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs, Film & Television | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 23, 2014

From the Bookshelves: Human Rights and Adolescence by Jacqueline Bhabha

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Human Rights and Adolescence by Jacqueline Bhabha, Editor

A volume in the Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights series .  While young children's rights have received considerable attention and have accordingly advanced over the last two decades, adolescent rights have been neglected, resulting in a serious rights lacuna. This manifests itself in pervasive gender-based violence, widespread youth disaffection and unemployment, concerning levels of self-abuse, violence and antisocial engagement, and serious mental and physical health deficits. The cost of inaction on these issues is likely to be dramatic in terms of human suffering, lost social and economic opportunities, and threats to global peace and security. Across the range of disciplines that make up contemporary human rights, from law and social advocacy, to global health, to history, economics, sociology, politics, and psychology, it is time for adolescent rights to occupy a coherent place of their own.

Human Rights and Adolescence presents a multifaceted inquiry into the global circumstances of adolescents, focused on the human rights challenges and socioeconomic obstacles young adults face. Contributors use new research to advance feasible solutions and timely recommendations for a wide range of issues spanning all continents, from relevant international legal norms to neuropsychological adolescent brain development, gender discrimination in Indian education to Colombian child soldier recruitment, stigmatization of Roma youth in Europe to economic disempowerment of Middle Eastern and South African adolescents. Taken together, the research emphasizes the importance of dedicated attention to adolescence as a distinctive and critical phase of development between childhood and adulthood, and outlines the task of building on the potential of adolescents while providing support for the challenges they experience.

Contributors: Theresa S. Betancourt, Jacqueline Bhabha, Krishna Bose, Neera Burra, Malcolm Bush, Jocelyn DeJong, Elizabeth Gibbons, Katrina Hann, Mary Kawar, Orla Kelly, David Mark, Margareta Matache, Clea McNeely, Glaudine Mtshali, Katie Naeve, Elizabeth A. Newnham, Victor Pineda, Irene Rizzini, Elena Rozzi, Christian Salazar Volkmann, Shantha Sinha, Laurence Steinberg, Kerry Thompson, Jean Zermatten, Moses Zombo.

Jacqueline Bhabha is Director of Research at the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health.

KJ

August 23, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 22, 2014

From the Bookshelves: Hidden Lives and Human Rights in the United States Understanding the Controversies and Tragedies of Undocumented Immigration by Lois Ann Lorentzen, Editor

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Hidden Lives and Human Rights in the United States Understanding the Controversies and Tragedies of Undocumented Immigration by Lois Ann Lorentzen, Editor

The most comprehensive collection of essays on undocumented immigration to date, covering issues not generally found anywhere else on the subject. Three fascinating volumes feature the latest research from the country's top immigration scholars. In the United States, the crisis of undocumented immigrants draws strong opinions from both sides of the debate. For those who immigrate, concerns over safety, incorporation, and fair treatment arise upon arrival. For others, the perceived economic, political, and cultural impact of newcomers can feel threatening. In this informative three-volume set, top immigration scholars explain perspectives from every angle, examining facts and seeking solutions to counter the controversies often brought on by the current state of undocumented immigrant affairs. Immigration expert and set editor Lois Lorentzen leads a stellar team of contributors, laying out history, theories, and legislation in the first book; human rights, sexuality, and health in the second; and economics, politics, and morality in the final volume. From family separation, to human trafficking, to notions of citizenship, this provocative study captures the human costs associated with this type of immigration in the United States, questions policies intended to protect the "American way of life," and offers strategies for easing tensions between immigrants and natural-born citizens in everyday life.

Features

Discusses topics rarely covered, including sexual migration, religion, values, and mental health

Features essays across disciplines in the fields of psychology, law, politics, social work, public policy, history, education, and health

Includes tables, maps, photos, and a bibliography for each volume to provide visual interest and additional learning opportunities

Probes the latest controversies centered on recent immigration legislation in Arizona, Georgia, and Alabama

Familiarizes readers with history, theories, and legislation related to undocumented migration in the United States.

Lois Ann Lorentzen, PhD, is professor in the theology and religious studies department and codirector of the Center for Latino/a Studies at the University of San Francisco. Her published works include Etica Ambiental; Raising the Bar: Integrity and Passion in Life and Business: The Story of Clif Bar Inc.; and Religion at the Corner of Bliss and Nirvana: Politics, Identity, and Faith in New Migrant Communities. She received her doctorate in social ethics at the University of Southern California.

KJ

August 22, 2014 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)