Saturday, May 31, 2014

Removal Without Recourse: The Growth of Summary Deportations from the United States

This American Immigration Council  fact sheet reviews how the deportation process has been transformed drastically over the last two decades. Today, two-thirds of individuals deported are subject to what are known as “summary removal procedures,” which deprive them of both the right to appear before a judge and the right to apply for status in the United States. In 1996, as part of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA), Congress established streamlined deportation procedures that allow the government to deport (or “remove”) certain noncitizens from the United States without a hearing before an immigration judge. Two of these procedures, “expedited removal” and “reinstatement of removal,” allow immigration officers to serve as both prosecutor and judge—often investigating, charging, and making a decision all within the course of one day. These rapid deportation decisions often fail to take into account many critical factors, including whether the individual is eligible to apply for lawful status in the United States, whether he or she has long-standing ties here, or whether he or she has U.S.-citizen family members.

In recent years, summary procedures have eclipsed traditional immigration court proceedings, accounting for the dramatic increase in removals overall. As the chart below demonstrates, since 1996, the number of deportations executed under summary removal procedures has dramatically increased.

Expedited_removals_and_reinstatements_of_removal_chart

KJ

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2014/05/removal-without-recourse-the-growth-of-summary-deportations-from-the-united-states-1.html

Current Affairs | Permalink

Comments