Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Realizing the Dream for Californians Eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA): Health Needs and Access to Health Care

A joint report from the UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education, the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, and the UCSF Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies: Realizing the Dream for Californians Eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA): Health Needs and Access to Health Care March 2014, by Claire D. Brindis, Max W. Hadler, Ken Jacobs, Laurel Lucia, Nadereh Pourat, Marissa Raymond-Flesch, Rachel Siemons and Efrain Talamantes 

The estimated 300,000 young California immigrants who are eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) use less medical care than their U.S.-born peers in spite of being more likely to report poor health, according to this report. In the report, DACA youth indicate that they often either avoid care completely or seek care outside of the mainstream medical system, except in instances of serious health need. Key barriers to accessing care include cost, limited health care literacy, difficulty navigating the health care system, mistrust of the health care system and its providers, and fear of deportation for themselves or their family members.

In this report, recommendations to improve health and access to care are suggested for health care providers, community-based organizations, policymakers and private and public funders. The report uses data from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), information collected in interviews with key immigration and health services providers, experts and advocates, as well as information from focus groups conducted with DACA-eligible young adults in Los Angeles and the Bay Area. This new report is the second in a two-part series on the profile of the DACA-eligible population in California. The companion report, which was released in February, described the demographics and health care coverage of Californians eligible for DACA. The report found that while teens and young adults granted DACA are excluded from federal Affordable Care Act health insurance options, up to 125,000 may be eligible for Medi-Cal services under California state policy, based on an analysis of CHIS data.

KJ

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2014/04/when-mandates-work-.html

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