Thursday, January 31, 2013

Immigration Article of the Day: Dark Justice: Australia's Indefinite Detention of Refugees on Security Grounds under International Human Rights Law by Ben Saul

AUS_orthographic_svg

Dark Justice: Australia's Indefinite Detention of Refugees on Security Grounds under International Human Rights Law by Ben Saul University of Sydney - Faculty of Law January 21, 2013 Melbourne Journal of International Law, Forthcoming Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 13/02

Abstract: This article examines Australia’s security assessment and related detention of refugees in the light of international human rights law. The current domestic legal process typically denies refugees any or adequate notice of the allegations and evidence against them, precludes merits review by an independent administrative tribunal and fails to provide genuine and effective judicial review of security assessments or detention (including a sufficient degree of procedural fairness and disclosure of essential evidence). The result is often indefinite detention of recognised refugees who cannot be removed from Australia and thus remain in a legal black hole where security decisions are immune from scrutiny. The current regime results in systematic violations of Australia’s obligations under arts 9(1), 9(2) and 9(4) of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. These violations are not remedied by the High Court of Australia’s fairly narrow, technical decision in the 2012 case, Plaintiff M47/2012 v Director-General of Security, or by the creation of the non-binding Independent Reviewer of ASIO assessments.

KJ

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2013/01/immigration-article-of-the-day--3.html

Current Affairs | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef017c36741e92970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Immigration Article of the Day: Dark Justice: Australia's Indefinite Detention of Refugees on Security Grounds under International Human Rights Law by Ben Saul :