Sunday, January 13, 2013

"Be Careful What You Ask For Department": Residents in Arizona town feel 'invaded by Border Patrol'

With the support of Governor Jan Brewer, the Arizona state legislature enacted an aggressive immigration enforcement law, which made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court.  One of the defenses of the law was that the U.S. government had failed to enforce the U.S. border with Mexico and that the states had to act

The Obama administration has responded and bolstered border enforcement in Arizona.  Cindy Carcamo of the Los Angeles Times reports that some residents of the small border town of Bisbee, Arizona are not too happy about the new enforcement regime: 

"Longtime locals say they damage irrigation lines, tread on land without permission, alienate merchants and contribute to a sense of unease that didn't use to exist.

But lately these complaints are aimed not so much at people arriving illegally from Mexico as they are at the federal forces sent to stop them.

Residents say the deployment of hundreds of agents — armed, uniformed and omnipresent — and millions of dollars in new infrastructure have created a military-like occupation in their once-sleepy hamlets.

They point to sprawling new facilities that dominate the scrubby landscape, such as the upgraded U.S. Border Patrol station in Naco and a fortified border fence that lights up like an airport runway lost among the yuccas. Some grumble that the federal agents are paid well above the county average while spurning the areas they patrol to live in a suburbanized town nearly 25 miles away."

As the old saying goes, you can please some of the people . . . .

KJ

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2013/01/be-careful-what-you-ask-for-department-.html

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