Saturday, March 26, 2011

"Anchor babies" is hate speech

Although published in August 2007, this column by Raoul Lowery Contreras deserves a read today as the debate over birthright citizenship and the 14th Amenndment rages.  It starts:

"Today's North County Times readers can't find an article that uses the infamous N-word, the Q-word (queer) or words like "homo" for homosexual. What they find is the use of the words "anchor babies" in letters or Opinion pieces. "Anchor babies" are words used by extremists to define babies born of illegal alien parents in the United States. Most of these children are born to Mexican parents illegally in the United States. Shamefully, the anti-illegal alien cohort also applies the term to any Mexican-American regardless of the legality of one or both parents, grandparents or great-grandparents."

For more on the history of the term "anchor baby," click here.  In the comments to a recent L.A. Times story on a maternity facility allegedly catering to "birthing tourism" from China, one comment was

"The government insists that Mexican women never do this. But these women came all the way from China. Why wouldn't a woman jump in over the Arizona border from Mexico and have an anchor baby? We need to change this stupid, stupid law. No other country does this. It's national suicide."

Other comments are just as caustic.


KJ

March 26, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Mexicans Fill Pews in the Big Apple

Kirk Semple of the New York Times reports on how Mexican immigrants have revitalized Roman Catholic Churches in New York City.

KJ

March 26, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Russell Pearce: One battle in Arizona immigration war

225px-Russell_Pearce_by_Gage_Skidmore 
Last week, the latest anti-immigrant proposals, including one targeted at birthright citizenship guaranteed by the 14th Amendment, failed in Arizona.  In this guest column on Politico.com, Arizona State Senator Russell Pearce blames the recent loss on the business lobby seeking cheap labor.  He also claims that the anti-immigrant movement will be back.  

A look at Senator Pearce's bio on his website reveals that he was a former Chief Deputy in the Maricopa County Sheriffs office, now home of Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who is frequently featured on ImmigrationProf for his controversial immigration activities.  Senator Pearce also mentions in his bio that 

"Two of my sons are in law enforcement, Colten with Gilbert P.D. and Sean with the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office. On Dec. 16, 2004 Sean was shot in the line of duty by an illegal alien while serving a homicide warrant on an illegal alien. I was in Washington D.C. at the time testifying about our nations failed immigration policies when I was handed a note and told there was an emergency at home and to call immediately. I called home and was told Sean was critically wounded after being shot in the chest and stomach and was being transported to Maricopa County Medical Center."

KJ 

March 26, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Armenians among fastest-growing groups of naturalized citizens in California

Amnew 
Natives of Armenia
are among the fastest-growing groups of naturalized citizens in Southern California, according to the Department of Homeland Security. On Thursday, March 24, more than 4,000 immigrants who live in Los Angeles and six other Southern California counties were sworn in as U.S. citizens. Their most common countries of origin, according to the Homeland Security Department, are Mexico, the Philippines, China, Iran, El Salvador and Armenia.

KJ

March 26, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

DHS Secretary: Border is Safer Now Than Ever

250px-Janet_Napolitano_official_portrait 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano visited the U.S.-Mexico border on Thursday. "There is a perception that the border is worse now than it ever has been," Napolitano said at the Bridge of The Americas border crossing in El Paso, Texas, the Associated Press reports. "That is wrong. The border is better now than it ever has been."   The perception that violent crime in Mexico is spilling into teh United States is false, Napolitano and local leaders said. Violent crime rates have remained flat or decreased in Southwest border communities, Napalitano said. 

KJ

March 26, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Friday, March 25, 2011

Black Intersections on Migration

You are invited to the 3rd national teleconference in the Black Alliance for Just Immigration series Black Intersections on Migration. This is a time to learn about black perspectives on immigration as well as hear about various concerns and viewpoints that aren’t being discussed in the media.

Join the Black Alliance for Just Immigration and Priority African Network on Thursday March 31st and 12pm PST with Jackie Copeland-Carson, PhD about New African immigrants grappling with concepts of race and identity.

Jackie Copeland Carson, PhD, is the author of "Creating Africa in America: Translocal Identity in an Emerging World City". She will speak on the following topics:

The need to develop a global Pan-African consciousness and examining misconceptions and stereotypes in the African Diaspora.

The increase in African and Caribbean immigrants in the U.S.

How African migration affects African-American communities and notions of race and identity

Possible ways for social justice activists to engage African immigrant communities when organizing for justice and human rights.

Join this free teleconference - Toll-free Dial-in (US/Canada): 1-866-931-7845 International Dial-in: 1-310-374-4949 Conference Code: 484457.  RSVP by calling (510) 663-2254 or sending an email to teleconference@blackalliance.org

KJ

March 25, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

SB 1070: Your State Still Can’t Afford It Attempts to Copy Arizona Immigration Law Run Into Harsh Reality of State Budget Crises, Uncooperative State Legislatures

Today, the National Immigration Forum released the report “In the States: Stepping into the Federal Void”, an update to their preliminary December report on attempts to copy Arizona’s controversial immigration law.  Despite overwhelming evidence that laws like Arizona’s won’t solve the broken immigration system, some state legislators have forged ahead with SB 1070-style bills. Meanwhile others, acknowledging the costs and opposition from the business, law enforcement and faith communities, have abandoned attempts to pass harsh anti-immigrant legislation. Already, SB 1070-style legislation has been defeated or abandoned in Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, Kentucky and South Dakota, and it’s on life support in Kansas. Strong leadership from several key state legislators has helped to defeat these bills and move the debate in a more constructive direction.

Already, 26 states are reporting billion dollar shortfalls for 2013, even as they try to close huge budget gaps for FY 2012. States couldn’t afford SB 1070-style laws in December, and they cannot afford them now. And opposition isn’t limited to concern about state budgets. Several legislators are rightfully worried about the overall cost to economic activity and the message Arizona-style legislation sends to tourists, investors, and visitors.

Passage of the bill caused irreparable damage to Arizona’s reputation. The state’s largest newspaper editorialized: “SB 1070 created such a noxious cloud of bad P.R. that Gov. Jan Brewer put $250,000 into repairing the state's image…Arizona is getting a global brand, and it's not the Grand Canyon State, but the place that is hostile to Hispanics and immigrants.” "Texas weathered the recession better than most states," said Senator Leticia Van de Putte, a San Antonio Democrat, "And that's because we welcome immigrants, investors, and tourists. Our explosive growth since the last Census is testament to our openness and business friendly policies. Laws like Arizona's would chase jobs out of Texas, severely damage our multi-billion dollar tourism industry, and send the wrong message to the rest of the world."

Meanwhile, law enforcement leaders have stepped up their opposition to harsh immigration laws like Arizona’s. “El Paso is already one of the safest cities in America,” said El Paso Sherriff Richard Wiles. “We don’t need counterproductive laws like Arizona’s that will make it harder for us to do our jobs and force us to do more with even fewer resources. I want my police officers focused on protecting communities and promoting public safety – not on enforcing federal immigration law. Our communities work with our officers to report and prevent crime, and that trust has made everyone safer. Laws like Arizona’s would destroy that trust.”

While some state legislators may still pass harsh anti-immigrant legislation, many of them have heeded Arizona’s cautionary tale. Strong leaders in state legislatures and in the business and law enforcement community have prevailed on elected officials the enormous costs and consequences of Arizona’s approach. With several sessions expiring in the coming months, it remains to be seen how many legislatures will listen to common sense voices and how many will step in to the federal void with foolish measures that will likely lead to prolonged court battles.

“Federal inaction on immigration has created a political and legal crisis and there is no excuse for continued delay,” said Ali Noorani, Executive Director of the National Immigration Forum. “Weak leadership and empty promises from Washington have forced unproductive and harsh debates in state legislatures, and until Congress acts, we’ll unfortunately see more attempts to pass fiscally and economically ruinous legislation like Arizona’s. States would be better served by pressuring their Congressional delegations to act immediately to solve this problem – at a federal level – once and for all.”

KJ

March 25, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Census 2010 and the Hispanic Population

Earlier today, Bill Hing posted about new Census data on Asian Americans.  The U.S. Census Bureau released today the second in a series of 2010 Census briefs, Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin: 2010, which looks at our nation's changing racial and ethnic diversity and provides a snapshot of the racial and Hispanic origin composition of the United States. The examination of racial and ethnic group distributions nationally shows that while the non-Hispanic white alone population is still numerically and proportionally the largest major race and ethnic group in the United States, it is also growing at the slowest rate. Conversely, the Hispanic and Asian populations have grown considerably, in part because of relatively higher levels of immigration.

Hispanic Population Growth

More than half of the growth in the total U.S. population between 2000 and 2010 was because of the increase in the Hispanic population. Between 2000 and 2010, the Hispanic population grew by 43 percent, rising from 35.3 million in 2000 to 50.5 million in 2010. The rise in the Hispanic population accounted for more than half of the 27.3 million increase in the total U.S. population. By 2010, Hispanics comprised 16 percent of the total U.S. population of 308.7 million.

The non-Hispanic population grew relatively slower over the decade at about 5 percent. Within the non-Hispanic population, the number of people who reported their race as white alone grew even slower (1 percent). While the non-Hispanic white alone population increased numerically from 194.6 million to 196.8 million over the 10-year period, its proportion of the total population declined from 69 percent to 64 percent.

Race Distribution

The overwhelming majority (97 percent) of the total U.S. population reported only one race in 2010. This group totaled 299.7 million. Of these, the largest group reported white alone (223.6 million), accounting for 72 percent of all people living in the United States.

The black or African-American population totaled 38.9 million and represented 13 percent of the total population.

Approximately 14.7 million people (about 5 percent of all respondents) identified their race as Asian alone.

There were 2.9 million respondents who indicated American Indian and Alaska Native alone (0.9 percent).

The smallest major race group was Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone (0.5 million), which represented 0.2 percent of the total population.

The remainder of respondents who reported only one race, 19.1 million people (6 percent of all respondents), were classified as "some other race" alone. Nine million people reported more than one race in the 2010 Census and made up about 3 percent of the total population.

Ninety-two percent of people who reported multiple races provided exactly two races in 2010; white and black was the largest multiple-race combination. An additional 8 percent of the two or more races population reported three races and less than 1 percent reported four or more races. Three quarters of multiple race combinations were comprised of four groups in 2010: white and black (1.8 million), white and "some other race" (1.7 million), white and Asian (1.6 million), and white and American Indian or Alaska Native (1.4 million).

The population reporting their race as white, either alone or with at least one other race, was the largest of all the alone-or-in-combination categories (231.0 million) and represented about three-fourths of the total population.

About 14 percent of the total population reported their race as black, either alone or with at least one other race, which was the second-largest of the alone-or-in-combination categories (42.0 million).

There were 21.7 million people classified as some other race alone or in combination and 17.3 million people classified as Asian alone or in combination in the 2010 Census, making up 7 percent and 6 percent of the total population, respectively.

The two smallest alone-or-in-combination categories were American Indian and Alaska Native (5.2 million) and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (1.2 million), making up 2 percent and 0.4 percent of the total population, respectively.

Asian Population Growth

The Asian alone population grew faster than any other major race group between 2000 and 2010, increasing by 43 percent. The Asian alone population had the second-largest numeric change (4.4 million), growing from 10.2 million in 2000 to 14.7 million in 2010. They gained the most in share of the total population, moving up from about 4 percent in 2000 to about 5 percent in 2010.

Geographic Distribution

In the 2010 Census, just over one-third of the U.S. population reported their race and ethnicity as something other than non-Hispanic white alone (i.e. "minority"). This group increased from 86.9 million to 111.9 million between 2000 and 2010, representing a growth of 29 percent over the decade. Geographically, particularly in the South and West, a number of areas had large proportions of the total population that was minority. Nearly half of the West's population was minority (47 percent), numbering 33.9 million. Among the states, California led the nation with the largest minority population at 22.3 million. Between 2000 and 2010, Texas joined California, the District of Columbia, Hawaii and New Mexico in having a "majority-minority" population, where more than 50 percent of the population was part of a minority group. Among all states, Nevada's minority population increased at the highest rate, by 78 percent.

Race and Hispanic Origin Data

The Census Bureau collects race and Hispanic origin information following the U.S. Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) standards for collecting and tabulating data on race and ethnicity. In October 1997, the OMB issued the current standards, which identify five race groups: white, black or African-American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. The Census Bureau also utilized a sixth category - "some other race." Respondents who reported only one race are shown in these six groups. Individuals were first presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race in the 2000 Census, and this continued in the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. The 2010 Census results provide new data on the size and makeup of the nation's multiracial population. Respondents who reported more than one of the six race groups are included in the "two or more races" population. There are 57 possible combinations of the six race groups. The Census Bureau included the "some other race" category for responses that could not be classified in any of the other race categories on the questionnaire. The vast majority of people who reported only as "some other race" were of Hispanic or Latino origin. Data on Hispanics or Latinos, who may be of any race, were obtained from a separate question on ethnicity.

KJ

March 25, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Asians in the Library Song (Response to UCLA's Alexandra Wallace)

 

Thanks to Cappy White for the assist.

To see Alexandra's original rant, click here.

KJ

 

March 25, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Birthright Citizenship Historical Underpinnings

Please join the Center for American Progress and the American Constitution Society for a special presentation:

Born in the USA?
The Historical and Constitutional Underpinnings of Birthright Citizenship
March 31, 2011, 12:00pm – 1:30pm

Admission is free.

Featured panelists:
Elizabeth Wydra, Chief Counsel, Constitutional Accountability Center
Garrett Epps, Professor of Law, University of Baltimore School of Law
James C. Ho, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher, former Solicitor General of Texas
Linda Chavez, Chairman, Center for Equal Opportunity

Moderator:
Sam Fulwood III, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress

On the first day of the 112th Congress, Rep. Steve King (R-IA) introduced legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives seeking to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to "clarify" which classes of U.S.-born children are citizens of the United States at birth. Representative King's bill reflects his assertion that the 14th Amendment does not guarantee citizenship at birth for U.S.-born children of temporary or undocumented immigrants. House Judiciary Committee Chair Lamar Smith (R-TX) agrees, and has declared his intention to hold hearings on the subject. Federal legislators are not the only ones to get into the mix. On January 5, a group of state legislators launched their own challenge to the 14th Amendment at a press conference in Washington where they announced their plans to pass state laws that would ultimately trigger a Supreme Court ruling on the issue.

On March 31, 2011, the American Constitution Society and the Center for American Progress will bring together leading thinkers to discuss current challenges to birthright citizenship and provide historical perspective to the debate about what the 14th Amendment guarantees.

March 31, 2011, 12:00pm – 1:30pm

Space is extremely limited. RSVP required.
Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis and not guaranteed.

Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m.

Center for American Progress
1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor
Washington, DC 20005
Map & Directions

Nearest Metro: Blue/Orange Line to McPherson Square or Red Line to Metro Center

RSVP to attend this event

For more information, call 202-682-1611.

bh

March 25, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Asian American Census Data

From the UCLA Asian American Studies Center:

UCLA AASC: 2011 Statistical Portrait of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Other Pacific Islanders
< http://www.aasc.ucla.edu/archives/stats2011.asp>

The UCLA Asian American Studies Center, as an official U.S. Census Information Center (as a co-partner with National Coalition for Asian Pacific Community Development), is pleased to provide this 2011 statistical portrait of the Asian American and Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander populations produced by the US Census Bureau for Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, which will take place in May, 2011. The portrait provides current census data, population projections, and internet links that should be useful for research, planning, writing and general educational purposes. Please see the "Editor's note" at the end of this announcement for more information.The first major section provides information on "Asians," while the second major part highlights "Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders".

Asians
16 million
The estimated number of U.S. residents of Asian descent in July 2009. This estimate includes those who said they were both Asian alone or Asian in combination with one or more other races.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

5.2 million
The Asian population in California; the state had the largest Asian population on July 1, 2009, followed by New York (1.5 million). Texas was next, reaching 1 million for the first time. In Hawaii, our nation's only majority-Asian state, Asians made up the highest proportion of the total population (53 percent). This includes both Asian alone or Asian in combination with one or more other races.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

2.6%
Percentage growth of the Asian population between 2008 and 2009, the second fastest-growing minority group (following the Hispanic population). This includes both Asian alone or Asian in combination with one or more other races.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

3.8 million
Number of Asians of Chinese descent in the U.S. in 2009. Chinese-Americans were the largest Asian group, followed by Filipinos (3.2 million), Asian Indians (2.8 million), Vietnamese (1.7 million), Koreans (1.6 million) and Japanese (1.3 million). These estimates represent the number of people who reported a specific Asian group alone, and people who reported that Asian group in combination with one or more other Asian groups or races.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance
$68,780
Median household income for single-race Asians in 2009. Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>
Median household income differed greatly by Asian group. For Asian Indians, for example, the median income in 2009 was $90,429; for Bangladeshi, it was $46,657. (These figures represent the single-race population.)
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

12.5%
The poverty rate for single-race Asians in 2009, not statistically different from the 2008 poverty rate. Between 2008 and 2009, the poverty rate increased for non-Hispanic whites (from 8.6 percent to 9.4 percent), for blacks (from 24.7 percent to 25.8 percent) and for Hispanics (from 23.2 percent to 25.3 percent).
Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009
< http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb10-144.html >

17.2%
Percentage of single-race Asians without health insurance coverage in 2009, not statistically different from 2008.
Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009
< http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb10-144.html >

Education
50%
The percentage of single-race Asians 25 and older who had a bachelor's degree or higher level of education. This compared with 28 percent for all Americans 25 and older.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

85%
The percentage of single-race Asians 25 and older who had at least a high school diploma. This is not statistically different from the percentage for the total population or the percentage of Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander alone, 85 and 86 percent respectively.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

20%
The percentage of single-race Asians 25 and older who had a graduate (e.g., master's or doctorate) or professional degree. This compared with 10 percent for all Americans 25 and older.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

Voting
589,000
How many more single-race Asians voted in the 2008 presidential election than in the 2004 election. All in all, 48 percent of Asians turned out to vote in 2008 - up 4 percentage points from 2004. A total of 3.4 million Asians voted.
Source: Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2008 < http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/voting/cb09-110.html >

Businesses
Source for the statements referenced in this section, unless otherwise indicated:
Survey of Business Owners
< http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/economic_census/cb10-107.html >

1.6 million
Number of businesses owned by Asian-Americans in 2007, an increase of 40.7 percent from 2002.

$514 billion
Total receipts of businesses owned by Asian-Americans, up 57.3 percent from 2002.
In 2007, 32.3 percent of Asian-owned businesses were in repair and maintenance; personal and laundry services; and professional, scientific and technical services.

47.2%
Percentage of businesses in Hawaii owned by people of Asian descent. It was 14.9 percent in California and 10.1 percent in New York.

510,000
California had the most Asian-owned firms at 509,670 (32.8 percent of all such firms), with receipts of $182.7 billion (35.6 percent of all Asian-owned firm receipts). New York was second with 196,919 Asian-owned firms or 12.7 percent, with receipts of $50.8 billion or 9.9 percent. Texas was third in number of Asian-owned firms with 114,593 or 7.4 percent, with receipts of $42.4 billion or 8.3 percent. New Jersey accounted for 4.4 percent of all Asian-owned firms and 5.9 percent of receipts, while Florida accounted for 4.2 percent of all Asian-owned firms and 3.4 percent of receipts.

Languages
2.6 million
The number of people 5 and older who spoke Chinese at home in 2009. After Spanish, Chinese was the most widely spoken non-English language in the country. Tagalog, Vietnamese and Korean were each spoken at home by more than 1 million people.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

Serving Our Nation
258,183
The number of single-race Asian military veterans. About one in three veterans was 65 years and older.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

Jobs
49%
The proportion of civilian employed single-race Asians 16 and older who worked in management, professional and related occupations, such as financial managers, engineers, teachers and registered nurses. Additionally, 17 percent worked in service occupations, 22 percent in sales and office occupations and 10 percent in production, transportation and material moving occupations.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

Internet Use
80%
Percentage of Asians living in a household with Internet use - the highest rate among race and ethnic groups. Source: Reported Internet Usage for Households, by selected Householder Characteristics; Current Population Survey: 2009
< http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/computer/2009.html >

Counties
1.4 million
The number of Asians (self-identified as Asian alone or in combination with one or more other races) in Los Angeles County, Calif., in 2009, which topped the nation's counties.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

17,000
Gain in Santa Clara County, Calif.'s Asian population (self-identified as Asian alone or in combination with one or more other races) from 2008 to 2009, the largest in the nation.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

57%
Percent of the population of Honolulu County, Hawaii, that was Asian (self-identified as Asian alone or in combination with one or more other races) in 2009, which led the country. Honolulu was the only majority-Asian county in the nation.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

Age Distribution
35.3
Median age of the single-race Asian population in 2009. The corresponding figure was
36.8 years for the population as a whole.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

23.6%
Percent of the single-race Asian population that was under age 18 as of July 1, 2009 while
9.6 percent was 65 or older.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

The Future
40.6 million
The projected number of U.S. residents in 2050 who will identify themselves as Asian or Asian in combination with one or more other races. They would comprise 9 percent of the total population by that year.
Source: Population projections < http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb08-123.html >

161%
The projected percentage increase between 2008 and 2050 in the population of people who identify themselves as Asian or Asian in combination with one or more other races. This compares with a 44 percent increase in the population as a whole over the same period of time.
Source: 2008 Population projections < http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb08-123.html >

Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders
1.1 million
The estimated number of U.S. residents in July 2009 who said they were Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, either alone or in combination with one or more other races. This group comprised 0.4 percent of the total population.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/national/asrh/NC-EST2009-srh.html>

California had the largest population of Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (284,000), followed by Hawaii (280,000) and Washington (58,000). California had the largest numerical increase in this group between July 1, 2008, and July 1, 2009 (6,000). In Hawaii, Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders comprised the largest proportion (22 percent) of the total population. This includes Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders alone and in combination with one or more other races. Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

2.3%
Percentage growth of the Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population between
2008 and 2009- third among race groups. This includes Native Hawaiians and Other
Pacific Islanders alone and in combination with one or more other races.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance
$53,455
The median income of households headed by single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders. Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

15.1%
The poverty rate for those who classified themselves as single-race Native Hawaiian and
Other Pacific Islander. This is not significantly different from the 2008 poverty rate.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

17.3%
The percentage without health insurance for single-race Native Hawaiians and Other
Pacific Islanders.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

Education
14%
The percentage of single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders 25 and older who had at least a bachelor's degree. This compared with 28 percent for the total population.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

86%
The percentage of single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders 25 and older who had at least a high school diploma. This is not statistically different from either the percentage for the total population or the percentage of Asian alone, both 85 percent.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

4%
The percentage of single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders 25 and older who had obtained a graduate or professional degree. This compared with 10 percent for the total population this age.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

Businesses
Source for the statements referenced in this section, unless otherwise indicated:
2007 Survey of Business Owners
< http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/economic_census/cb10-107.html >

38,881
The number of Native Hawaiian- and Other Pacific Islander-owned businesses in 2007, up
34.3 percent from 2002.

$7.0 billion
Total receipts of these businesses, up 62.9 percent from 2002.

26.9 %
The percent of all Native Hawaiian- and Other Pacific Islander-owned businesses that were repair and maintenance, personal and laundry services, and construction.

9.4%
The percent of businesses in Hawaii owned by Native Hawaiian- and Other Pacific Islanders, highest among all states.

Serving Our Nation
30,110
The number of single-race Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander military veterans. About one in five veterans was 65 years and older.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

Jobs
24%
The proportion of civilian employed single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders
16 and older who worked in management, professional and related occupations, such as financial managers, engineers, teachers and registered nurses. This is not significantly different from the 25 percent worked in service occupations, while 28 percent worked in sales and office occupations and 14 percent in production, transportation and material moving occupations.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey < http://factfinder.census.gov>

Counties
176,000
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population (alone or in combination with one or more other races) in Honolulu County, Hawaii, in 2009, which led the nation. Among counties, Harris County, Texas had the largest numerical increase in this race since July 2008 ? 722. Hawaii County, Hawaii, had the highest percentage of people of this race (30 percent).
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

Age Distribution
29.9
The median age of the single-race Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population in 2009. The median age was 36.8 for the population as a whole.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

34%
Percentage of the single-race Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population that was under age 18 as of July 1, 2009 while 6.3 percent was 65 or older.
Source: Population estimates < http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html>

The Future
2.6 million
The projected number of U.S. residents in 2050 who will identify themselves as Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander or Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander in combination with one or more other races. They would comprise 0.6 percent of the total population by that year.
Source: Population projections < http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb08-123.html >

132%
The projected percentage increase between 2008 and 2050 in the population of people who identify themselves as Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander or Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander in combination with one or more other races. This compares with a 44 percent increase in the population as a whole over the same period of time.
Source: Population projections < http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb08-123.html >

bh

March 25, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Debate over Immigration Politics moves from the Legislature to City Halls

For more than two hours, the City of Mesa's Human Relations Advisory Board heard testimony for and against the Utah Compact, an immigration policy statement endorsed in November by numerous leaders in that state. to Read more click here and for a video clip here.

EQ

March 24, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Rising Tide or a Shrinking Pie: The Economic Impact of Legalization Versus Deportation in Arizona,

As Arizona approaches the one-year anniversary of the passage of SB 1070, the Immigration Policy Center and Center for American Progress release a new report, Rising Tide or a Shrinking Pie: The Economic Impact of Legalization Versus Deportation in Arizona, by Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda and Marshall Fitz, which examines two very different futures for Arizona's economy. In the first scenario, the proponents of SB 1070 achieve their stated goals and all current unauthorized immigrants leave the state - taking their labor, their spending power, and their tax dollars with them. In the second scenario, unauthorized immigrants are offered a pathway to legal status, thereby enabling them to earn higher wages, spend more, and pay more in taxes. The economic modeling shows that deporting all of Arizona's unauthorized workers, consumers, and taxpayers would eliminate 581,000 jobs and reduce state tax revenues by $4.2 billion. Conversely, legalizing the state's unauthorized immigrants would create 261,000 jobs and increase tax revenues by $1.7 billion.

According to Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda, the report's author and founding director of the North American Integration and Development Center at UCLA: "The key issue is that bills like SB 1070 that seek to eliminate the undocumented population, if successful, would represent a severe shock to the Arizona economy and create a deep hole that the state would have to claw out of. The size of that hole is what this new report measures."

According to Benjamin Johnson, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council: "One of the byproducts of inaction to reform our deeply flawed immigration system is that the current unauthorized population in the U.S. has established deep roots which are intricately connected to our federal and state economies. More than 60% of the current unauthorized population has been in the United States for more than 10 years. As a result, proposals to deport them or drive them away will come with a huge cost. What today's report makes clear is that states can either impose a huge deportation tax on their economy in a quest to enforce their way out of our broken immigration system. Or they can harness the economic potential of immigration for the good of their states."

According to Nan Walden, Arizona Businesswoman and Vice President and Counsel at Farmers Investment Co.: "This new report quantifies what we've been seeing on the ground for the past year. People are leaving, along with their tax and consumer dollars and visitors aren't coming because they are unsure of the climate. It is clear that SB 1070 is not good for Arizona business."

KJ

March 24, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

More songs circulated in the Immprof list serv

Two more contributions to the growing list of immigrantion-related songs from the immigration professor's list serv.  I hope those of you who have musical talents find and practice these songs in anticipation of perforiming them at our next immigration professor's conference--hiroshi are you listening?

From Professor Ruben G. Rumbaut (UC Irvine-Sociology

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To the wonderful compilation of songs on the immigrant experience, here're five more (from Mexican artists), compliments of my wife Irene

"Lamento de un bracero" -- Antonio Aguilar
"Un mojado sin licencia" -- Grupo Tayer
"La tumba del mojado" -- Los Tigres del Norte
"Julio César Chávez" -- Ramón Ayala
"Los mandados" -- Vicente Fernández

And still more, with YouTube links (this from my brother Luis Rumbaut, a lawyer in DC who played in a band himself):

Todos Vuelven may have been covered by Blades, but it was originally a vals peruano (canción criolla) from before i was born: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqx7DrMEc7c
 
my candidate (our band used to play it, with much appreciation by the audience): Vivan los Mojados, also from Los Tigres del Norte:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DmN9XQUXgZY
 
but the generic granddady of them all (1915!) may be Canción Mixteca, here done by the mind-stretching Lila Downs:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rexc-Goc8_Y&feature=related

From Professor Sheila Velez (Pittsburg-Law)


1. Visa para un sueño,  Juan Luis Guerra .  (Visa for a Dream) Juan Luis Guerra is a Dominican singer and song writer, his music can be distinguished because he infuses the traditional rhythms of the Dominican Republic (bachata, perico ripiao, merengue) with poetry and social commentary. This song is about the struggle of Dominican who migrate, the false papers and the long lines under the burning sun at the US Consulate in Santo Domingo. For those of you that think that you can not dance merengue, watch the dancers in the background and give it a try. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PiC9TyiBoxI

2. No me llames extranjero, Alberto Cortez ( poem  by Amor) (Do not call me a stranger or foreigner).  Alberto Cortez is one of the leading voices of Latin American music, a household name, a voice we all grew up with. This is a powerful song that after all this years always moves me to tears.  It hangs in my office."Do not call me a stranger because I was born under other skies!  your wheat is like me wheat, your hand is like my hand, your fire like my fire and hunger" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSQMmyHfgSg

3. Boricua en la luna,  Roy Brown and Fiel a la Vega (Boricua in the moon)  (poem by el maestro Juan Antonio Corretjer) Juan Antonio Corretjer, Puerto Rico´s national poet was born in New York. This is song is about Puerto Rican migration to New York and Puerto Rican identity.  Boricua refers to the taino name of the Island, Borikén.  We are all Boricuas and we are known all trough Latin America as Boricuas like people from Costa Rica are Ticos. "Yo serÃa borincano aunque naciera en la luna" I would be Borincano even if I was born in the moon. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83U_kVYT8hc

4. En la otra orilla, Frank Delgado.  (In the other shore) Frank Delgado is a contemporary Cuban singer and songwriter that lives in Havana.  His songs are full of criticism of the current Cuban social and political situation in a witty and sardonic way.   This song is about the the relationships between those who left Cuba and those who remain.  How at first all those who left were called gusanos (worms)  but as the divisas became a necessity they came to be called comunitarios. A veritable example of transnationalism.     How family, music and santeria holds both shores together in spite of politics and distance.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--ZPCVCC4H0&feature=related

He also has a very popular son called Letter from a Cuban Boy to Harry Potter. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRRQoYYXa4w&feature=related

5. Redemption Song,  Bob Marley.  No introduction necessary. "Old pirates, yes, they rob I Sold I to the merchant ships Minutes after they took I From the bottomless pit But my hand was made strong By the hand of the almighty We forward in this generation Triumphantly" Another song of freedom, redemption songs emancipate yourself from mental slavery. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJHgMD1S0bg

If you like reggae you can also check out, Deportee by Buju Banton, it deals with the life of persons deported back to Jamaica. "Back together again, mi baby fren'
Dust off yuh clothes, an' start from scratch again Back together again, mi baby fren' Dust off yuh clothes, an' start, nuh true" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmmUKFvZVd0

6. Papeles Mojados, Chambao. (Wet papers) Chambao is a techno flamenco group from AndalucÃa, Spain.  The name refers to the tent fisherman in the region use to protect themselves from sun and sand.  The song is about African migrants crossing the Mediterraneo.  TMany don´t make it, they dreams drown, we papers, papers without owner" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ad58oDZ4i_0

7. Clandestino,  Manu Chao.  Manu Chao is a Basque and Gallego singer.   The Clandestino album was released in 1998 and even features a commentary by Subcomandante Marcos (ejercito zapatista de liberacion nacional). "Alone I go with my sorrow Alone goes my sentence To run is my destiny To escape the law Lost in the heart of the great Babylon They call me clandestine For not having any papers" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ad58oDZ4i_0

8. Pa´l Norte , Calle 13. (To the north) Calle 13 Residente is a controversial urban singer and songwriter from Puerto Rico.   He is widely known through out Latin America for his controversial lyrics and social activism. "Today I leave to the north without passport... on foot, on paws... but it doesn't matter this man hydrates himself with what my eyes portray with a pair of landscapes in my knapsack with vitamins of chlorophyll with a rosary that keeps watching on me."  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBYO1ZfxxSM

My personal favorite, El hormigero, (The Anthill) About the unstoppable growth of the Latino community "Here we come, the ants invading enemy lands, our invasion without missiles, underground ants can overcome any giant, the sting you feel later, there are more ants than cowboys,  the humble eat the nobleman, by 2020 we will double, you have to share the candies " http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQGQMsNrXy4

9. Pobre Juan, Maná (Poor Juan)  Mana is a popular rock band from Guadalajara, Mexico.  Pobre Juan is the history of a young man with a pregnant wife, he leaves for the north, but never makes it.   Betrayed by the coyotes, it is never known if it was la migra o the desert but Juan never returned.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Mm7GRyvgcI

10. La casa por la ventana, Joaquin Sabina (Throwing the house trough the window)  Joaquin Sabina is one of the most popular Spanish singers and songwriters.  Do not be fooled by the salsa rythm, is a heartbreaking song about immigrants in Spain: Dominicans,Cubans, Africans, Roma an even Ukranians that " in plazas and cinemas for a plate of soup and a straw mattress, with a carpet and a kleenex polish and shine Europe's " http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byB61uYe1GU

11. Te guste o no, Juan Manuel Serrat.  (Like it or not) The great Catalan singer and songwriter Joan Manuel Serrat sings about loving the similarities but loving even more the differences between us all.  Multiculturalism at its best. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4cN6n5P33M

12. Cantares,  Juan Manuel Serrat (poem by the great Antonio Machado).  This is not really a song about immigration but about forging your own path.  Venturing out, walking and leaving behind what you might never be able to come back to.  And doing it full of hope. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lj-W6D2LSlo

EQ

March 24, 2011 in Music | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Obama: Keep Families Together; DHS: Separate Families

From America's Voice:

In El Salvador, President Obama Calls for an Immigration System that Keeps Families Together

In America, DHS Separates a Four Year-Old From Her Parents

Washington, DC – In El Salvador yesterday, President Barack Obama called for bipartisan comprehensive immigration reform.  He also said: “America is a nation of laws, and it is a nation of immigrants.  And so our job is to create secure borders, to make sure that we've got a legal immigration system that is effective and is not frustrating for families, doesn't divide families.”

The same evening, the New York Times reported that the Department of Homeland Security had recently returned a four year-old U.S. citizen to Guatemala after she tried to re-enter the country with her grandfather.  Emily Ruiz’s grandfather, who had a valid visa, was detained on suspicion of a decades-old immigration violation when he and Emily tried to re-enter the U.S. after a trip.  The parents, who are undocumented, say that officials gave them an untenable choice: turn their daughter over to the state of Virginia, or have her return to their family in Guatemala. 

According to the Times, “Terrified that she would be given up for adoption if she entered state custody, Mr. Ruiz said, he agreed to put her on a plane back to Guatemala. “We were very worried, and my wife was crying and crying at what was happening,” Mr. Ruiz said.

The tragic story is yet another example of the President’s words not being matched by his Administration’s actions.  Despite pledging to focus efforts on the “worst of the worst,” the Department of Homeland Security continues to deport hundreds of thousands of immigrants with no criminal records, refuses to limit programs like Secure Communities and 287(g) to focus on convicted criminals, and continues to arrest and try to deport young people eligible for the DREAM Act. 

Frank Sharry, Executive Director of America’s Voice said, “The Obama Administration’s actions simply don’t match the President’s rhetoric.  He is right that our immigration system should strive to keep families together, not tear them apart.  Unfortunately, his Administration has done exactly that.  There is a wide gap between the President’s principles on immigration and the policies his government is implementing, and the human toll of this disconnect has grown to tragic proportions.  Yes, we need Congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform, but we also need President Obama to assert control over his Department of Homeland Security to ensure that its actions match the President’s commitment to enforce our immigration laws with discretion, humanity and common sense.”

bh

March 24, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Transatlantic Cooperation on Travelers’ Data Processing: From Sorting Countries to Sorting Individuals

The Migration Policy Institute has released a second study in partnership with the European University Institute on ways in which the United States and Europe can address major immigration challenges facing policymakers on both sides of the Atlantic. The report, Transatlantic Cooperation on Travelers’ Data Processing: From Sorting Countries to Sorting Individuals, examines the post-9/11 programs and agreements implemented by US and European governments to identify terrorists and serious transnational criminals through the collection and processing of increasing quantities of traveler data.

Authors Paul De Hert and Rocco Bellanova detail how governments, which once focused their screening primarily on a traveler’s nationality (“sorting countries”), increasingly are more directly examining personal characteristics (“sorting individuals”). While such data processing is supposed to help governments maintain more effective control over cross-border movement without hampering mobility, data sharing and data processing raise a host of legal and political questions related to individuals’ privacy and data-protection rights. This informative report examines the agreements the United States and European Union have struck over Passenger Name Record (PNR) data, as well as ongoing transatlantic information-sharing agreement negotiations and the European Commission’s efforts to achieve an EU-wide framework. Several issues arise from governments’ use (and sometimes misuse) of travelers’ data, including: use of sensitive personal information for purposes other than counterterrrorism and transnational crime control; and travelers’ right to judicial redress and compensation if the data are misused.

With the United States and the European Union engaged in negotiations that have surfaced their differences on data protection and privacy, the authors suggest those differences are less about principles than about different legal and institutional structures and different approaches to implementing these principles. As such, it may be difficult to negotiate common procedures and processes, particularly in areas of judicial redress and data retention and scope of collection.

KJ

March 24, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

CALL FOR PAPERS: Politics of Race, Immigration and Ethnicity Consortium

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UC Davis will be hosting the Politics of Race, Immigration and Ethnicity Consortium on Friday, May 6.  PRIEC is an ongoing series of meetings that brings together faculty and graduate students and showcases work-in-progress on racial/ethnic politics and the politics of immigration. The consortium’s main objectives are to provide a forum and a resource for graduate students seeking mentoring and advice, and for faculty to collaborate and receive feedback on ongoing projects.

The meeting is multidisciplinary in nature. 

Call for Papers

We invite you to the May 6, 2011 meeting of PRIEC, the Politics of Race, Immigration and Ethnicity Consortium. The meeting will be held on the campus of the University of California, Davis in Davis, CA. We seek submissions from political scientists, sociologists, economics, law and cognate disciplines, at the professor or graduate student level. We are interested in researchers doing new work on the political and social condition of marginalized groups, with particular focus on immigration, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, sectarian identity, and social class. If you are interested in presenting, please submit a title and brief overview of the nature of the paper/project AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

All proposals and/or commitments-to-attend should be sent to bsjjones@ucdavis.edu.

The event will begin in the morning of May 6 and continue through the late afternoon. An informal reception and dinner will be held on the evening of May 6.

The state-of-the art UC-Davis Alumni Center will serve as the venue for the meeting.

KJ

March 24, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

YALE LAW SCHOOL ROBERT M. COVER FELLOWSHIP (in the Worker & Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic)

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Our regular law student readers who might be interested in this amazing fellowship possibility.  Yale Law School seeks applications for a Robert M. Cover Fellowship in Public Interest Law, a two-year position beginning on or about July 1, 2011 in the Yale Law School clinical program. The Fellowship is designed for a lawyer with at least two years of practice who is considering a career in law school clinical teaching. The 2011-2013 Fellow will work with the Worker & Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (“WIRAC”). WIRAC is a year-long in-house clinic whose students represent immigrants, workers, and their organizations in litigation under labor and employment, immigration, Freedom of Information Act, § 1983, and other civil rights laws; state and local legislative advocacy; and other non-litigation matters. Illustrative cases include representation of the “Danbury 11,” a group of day-laborers arrested in an immigration sting operation conducted by local police, in their removal proceedings and in an affirmative civil rights suit; representation of persons arrested in the 2007 immigration raids in New Haven, two days after the Board of Aldermen had overwhelmingly endorsed a mayoral proposal to offer a municipal identification card to all residents regardless of immigration status, in their removal proceedings and affirmative civil rights litigation; employment litigation on behalf of a group of Guatemalan workers trafficked to Connecticut and forced to work in a commercial nursery; multiple suits by former restaurant employees denied minimum wage and overtime; habeas litigation by immigration detainees challenging their prolonged detention; and representation of community organizations, unions, and faith organizations in an effort to reform Connecticut’s in-state tuition statute, Hartford and New Haven living wage ordinances, and state and local confidentiality, policing, probation, and other laws and policies.

The Fellow’s responsibilities include representing clients, supervising students, assisting in teaching classes, and working on one's own scholarship. Candidates must be prepared to apply for admission to the Connecticut bar. All work will be conducted with the support of the clinical faculty, and will focus on providing legal assistance to low-income and civil rights clients and organizations. The principal supervisors for the position will be Professors Muneer Ahmad and Michael Wishnie.

Candidates must be able to work both independently and as part of a team, and must possess strong written and oral communication skills. Experience in creative and community-driven advocacy is a strong plus. Annual salary is $61,000. Fellows receive health benefits and access to university facilities. Send (or email) a resume, cover letter, writing sample, law school transcript, and names, addresses and telephone numbers of three references by April 10, 2011 to: Kathryn Jannke, Office Manager, The Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization, P.O. Box 209090, New Haven, CT 06520-9090; telephone: (203) 432-4800; fax: (203) 432-1426; or email Kathryn Jannke: kathryn.jannke@yale.edu.

KJ

March 24, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

What's IS Going on in Arizona? Part II

Earlier today, Evelyn Cruz, an Arizona resident and professor at one of the state's two public law schools, responded to my invitation for an explanation of the bizarro anti-immigrant, anti-Mexican ouburst in the part wild, wild West known as Arizona.  Her insightful take on the politics of Arizona provoked me to consider supporting a new Obama administration economic stimulus package with a direct infusion of billions into the Arizona public education system. 

Here is another point of view.  In "Securing Arizona" in the Boston ReviewTom Barry, a senior analyst with the Center for International Policy, offers his thoughts on the political economics of Arizona.  Barry leaves us little room for optimism about the future of this former boom state, although the recovery of the U.S. economy and congressional passage of immigration reform could not hurt.

KJ

March 23, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Why was a U.S. Citizen (Child) Forcibly Returned to Guatemala? The Story of Emily Ruiz

Read Ruben Navarrette Jr.'s account of the trevails of Emily Ruiz, the 4-year-old U.S. citizen from New York, who -- after traveling to Guatemala to visit relatives with her grandfather -- was denied entry into the United States by U.S. Customs and Border Protection and instead returned to Guatemala. 

"It's outrageous," David Sperling, the family's attorney, told Navarrette. "Effectively, she was deported. They treated her like an 'anchor baby,' like a second-class citizen. I can't imagine that they would treat any other U.S. citizen this way." Sperling was asked if he believed that Emily was treated shoddily because she is Latina:  "Absolutely," he said. "If this was a Caucasian girl from some European country, this would never have happened." (emphasis added).

This is precisely the kind of case in which teh U.S. government splits up families in the name of enforcement of teh immigration laws that, as I recently blogged about, gets Ninth Circuit Judge Harry Pregerson riled up.

For more on this story, click here.

KJ

March 23, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)