Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Arizona: Something in the Water? The Sun?

Sandip Roy in the Huffington Post powerfully condemns recent goings-on in Arizona.  Check it out!

KJ 

June 15, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

June 14: The Anniversary of the California Republic

125px-1stBearFlag_svg
Underbelly
reminds us that yesterday was not just Flag Day in the United States.  On June 14, 1846, a bunch of Anglo immigrants revolted against the lawful Mexican government and declared itself the California Republic. 

KJ

June 15, 2010 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Call for Papers: Columbia Journal of Race and Law

The Columbia Journal of Race and Law (CJRL) is now accepting submissions of articles, essays and other original works for possible publication in the Fall 2010 edition of the Journal.

CJRL is the newest addition to Columbia Law School’s scholarly journals and will begin publication in the 2010-2011 academic year.  Our mission is to establish a dialogue on historic and contemporary notions of socio-political and legal challenges facing racial and ethnic minorities.  We formerly existed at Columbia as the National Black Law Journal (NBLJ), a national journal based at Columbia for the past decade which is transitioning to another institution at the end of this academic year.  As an independent journal, CJRL provides us with an exciting opportunity to deepen the discourse on race and the law both within Columbia and the broader legal community.

The Journal welcomes the submission of original manuscripts, with both text and footnotes typed and double-spaced.  Along with the piece, please submit a resume and a brief description of how your work advances legal scholarship and is distinct from other articles that pertain to similar issues.  All manuscript correspondence should be submitted through the Espresso Submissions Service or via email to cjrl@law.columbia.edu.

CJRL seeks to forge strong institutional and individual relationships by attentively developing each publication and by providing a distinct platform for the scholarship published in the Journal.  To that end, we welcome opportunities to collaborate on symposia and other events, in addition to article submissions.

bh

June 15, 2010 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Human Rights Fellowship

The Post-Deportation Human Rights Project (PDHRP), an initiative of the Center for Human Rights and International Justice at Boston College, seeks applications for a Human Rights Fellow. The position is for one year and will begin in August 2010. The PDHRP is a pilot program designed to counsel, support, and represent individuals who have been deported from the United States (U.S.); to investigate the effects of harsh deportation policies on families and communities; to advocate, in collaboration with affected families and communities, for fundamental changes that will introduce legal predictability, proportionality, compassion, and respect for family unity into U.S. immigration law and policy; and to reframe deportation policy as a matter of international human rights. Responsibilities of the Human Rights Fellow include o Collaborating with faculty and students from the Boston College Law School, Lynch School of Education and Graduate School of Social Work on inter-disciplinary research projects investigating the effects of deportation on individuals, families, and communities. o Developing training materials and providing technical assistance to attorneys handling post-removal cases. o Conducting client intakes and outreach to advocacy organizations to indentify potential new cases. o Recruiting and mentoring pro bono attorneys. o Collaborating with immigrant communities, the legal community, the academic community, and legislators to transform the laws governing deportation. o Supervising law students who assist in the representation of clients with final orders of removal. Legal matters currently being handled by the PDHRP include: motions to reopen removal proceedings; consular processing with waivers; non-immigrant waiver applications; and U-visas. o Drafting human rights reports focusing on deportation. o Conducting media outreach and drafting op-eds for publication in newspapers and professional journals. o Organizing and speaking at conferences and public events focusing on human rights issues related to deportation.

Candidates must have a JD or LL.M., be proficient in Spanish, be licensed to practice law in the United States, and have substantial experience practicing immigration or human rights law. Some background in community organizing is a plus, as is an understanding of the immigration consequences of criminal convictions. Salary is commensurate with experience and includes benefits. Review of applications will begin in June, 2010, and will continue until the position is filled. To apply, please send a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, list of three references, and a writing sample to Anjani Datla anjani.datla@bc.edu

 For more information about the Post-Deportation Human Rights Project at the Center for Human rights and International Justice please visit: http://www.bc.edu/centers/humanrights/projects/deportation.html

KJ

June 15, 2010 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, June 14, 2010

Taking a Stand Against Local Regulation

From the Center for American Progress:

Arizona Calls the Question--Obama Administration Must Form an Answer on State Immigration Regulations

By Marshall Fitz

The Center for American Progress believes that regulation of immigration and enforcement of civil immigration laws are inherently federal responsibilities under Article I of the Constitution. Fifty different jurisdictions making 50 different sets of rules regulating immigrants would fundamentally negate the federal government’s interest in a coherent and unified foreign policy, not to mention its interest in facilitating interstate commerce. Permitting counties and municipalities to do the same would exponentially increase the chaos.

Read more and download the full report here.

bh

June 14, 2010 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

United American Families Act to be Added to CIR ASAP

On May 24, Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-IL) announced he would add same-sex binational couples to his House immigration reform bill known as "CIR ASAP (H.R. 4321). When the bill was introduced late last year, its failure to include same-sex binational couples was a glaring omission that spurned activists from Out4Immigration and beyond to flood the Representative's office with phone calls, emails, letters and faxes. We also took the issue to the many elected officials who are supporters of the Uniting American Families Act (UAFA), LGBT rights and immigration rights and asked them to convey their concerns. When the bill comes up in the House for debate, Gutierrez has pledged to add an amendment that will allow LGBT Americans and permanent residents with foreign partners the right to sponsor their partners for a green card.

KJ

June 14, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

NEW AMERICANS IN THE OCEAN AND CONSTITUTION STATES: Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians are a Growing Economic Force in Rhode Island and Connecticut

The Immigration Policy Center has compiled research which shows that immigrants, Latinos, and Asians are an important part of Rhode Island and Connecticut's economies, labor force, and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic force as consumers, taxpayers, and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, Latinos, Asians and immigrants will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Ocean and Constitution States.

KJ

June 14, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Learn Mandarin in U.S. Public Schools and Become a Communist

Some residents of Hacienda Heights, California are upset that the local school board has decided to offer Mandarin in the a middle school program next school year. It seems that some residents equate learning Mandarin with become communist. Here's a piece that was done on the story by Jon Stewart's Daily Show.

bh

June 14, 2010 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Eighth Annual LatCrit-SALT Junior Faculty Development Workshop October 7-8, 2010 in Denver, Colorado (immediately preceding LatCrit XV, October 8-10, 2010)

LatCrit, Inc. (LatCrit) and the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) are pleased to invite you to the Eighth Annual Junior Faculty Development Workshop (FDW), immediately preceding the LatCrit XV program. This annual workshop is designed for critical, progressive, and social justice oriented pre-tenure professors, including clinicians and legal writing professors, as well as those who may be contemplating a teaching career. However, we encourage more senior members of the profession to attend, share their experience, and serve as resources and mentors. The FDW is designed to familiarize critical, progressive, and social justice oriented junior faculty with LatCrit and SALT principles and values and support them in the scholarship, teaching, and service aspects of professional success. In addition, the FDW seeks to foster scholarship in progressive, social justice, and critical outsider jurisprudence, including LatCrit theory, among new and junior faculty, students, and practitioners. Finally, the FDW aims to cultivate a community of scholars interested in the continuation of this and similar projects over the years. Please inform your progressive and critical colleagues who are interested in making social justice central to their teaching, scholarship, and activism about this event. To facilitate community building through shared experiences and the exchange of ideas, we hope that all participants will attend the entire workshop. For more information about the FDW, please go to http://www.law.du.edu/latcrit/JuniorFacultyDevWork.htm  or http://www.law.du.edu/latcrit/ACXV.htm.

KJ

June 14, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Supremes Rule for Immigrants -- AGAIN!

In another victory for immigrants in the U.S. Supreme Court (who won in three of four cases last Term and are doing quite well this Term -- including an important victories in Padlilla v, Kentucky and Kucana v. Holder), the Court today ruled for a long-term (since 1983) lawful permanent resident facing deportation and against the government in Carachuri-Rosendo v. Holder.  The case presented the question whether a misdemeanor state drug possession conviction amounted to an "aggravated felony" under the U.S. immigration laws.  The Court ruled "no" in the circumstances of the case before it.

For background on Carachuri-Rosendo, click here and here

Justice Stevens, also the author of the majority opinion in Padilla v. Kentucky, wrote for a unanimous  Court, although Justices Scalia and Thomas concurred in the judgment.  Download 09-60[1]

Kudos to the University of Houston Immigration Law Clinic!  Geoff Hoffman, Professor and Clinic Director, worked on the case with Sri Srinivasan of O'Melveny & Myers, along with Clinic students Charlotte Simon (2L), Magda Gonzalez (2L), and Andrea Boulares (2L). 


UPDATE June 21:  The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear at least a dozen cases from people awaiting immigration action for drug convictions in light of the ruling in Carachuri-Rosendo.

KJ

June 14, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Human Rights Visiting Professorship at the University of Chicago

The Human Rights Program of the University of Chicago seeks nominations and applications for the Richard and Ann Pozen Distinguished Visiting Professorship for 2010-11 and 2011-12. The Pozen Professorship is for a senior scholar or practitioner with a distinguished record in human rights in the academic, professional, journalistic, political, or civic world. The 2010 Pozen Visiting Professor was Justice Albie Sachs of the South African Constitutional Court. The Pozen Professor will be in residence for one 10-week academic quarter and will teach one undergraduate course and gives several public lectures. Compensation is generous and includes transportation.  Please send materials by June 15, 2010 to Prof. Michael Geyer, Human Rights Program, c/o Sarah Moberg spmoberg@uchicago.edu

KJ 

June 14, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Manufacturing a Border Crisis By Kent Paterson

Mexico-border-300x200
Americas Program has a thoughtful article by Kent Paterson about how the U.S./Mexico border "crisis" has been manufactured by political leaders.  The border by all appearances is safe.  And, if the idea was to secure immigration reform, so far it has failed miserably!

KJ

June 14, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, June 13, 2010

Ninth Circuit Rules Against Day Laborers

Earlier this week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in a 2-1 decision reversed the district court and upheld in the face of a First Amendment challenge a City of Redondo Beach ordinance that prohibits day laborers from soliciting employment on the streets.  In Comite de Jornaleros de Redondo Beach v. City of Redondo Beach. the Ninth Circuit in an opinion by Judge Sandra Ikuta found the case indistinguishable from ACORN v. City of Phoenix, 798 F.2d 1260 (9th Cir. 1986) and held that the ordinance constituted a valid time, place, or manner restriction consistent with theh First Amendment.  Judge Kim McLane Wardlaw dissented.  The Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights for the San Francisco Bay Area and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund represented the Comite de Jornaleros.

This decision could have an impact on the legality of the provisions of the recent Arizona immigration law regulating the solicitation of employment by day laborers.

KJ

June 13, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Arizona: Then They Came After (the U.S. Citizen) Children

Adam Klawonn reports in TIME that "Arizona Republicans will likely introduce legislation this fall that would deny birth certificates to children born in Arizona — and thus American citizens according to the U.S. Constitution — to parents who are not legal U.S. citizens. The law largely is the brainchild of state Sen. Russell Pearce, a Republican whose suburban district, Mesa, is considered the conservative bastion of the Phoenix political scene. He is a leading architect of the Arizona law that sparked outrage throughout the country: Senate Bill 1070 . . . ."

As consistently interpreted by the courts, the Fourteenth Amendment bestows U.S. citizenship upon virtually all persons born on U.S. soil, whatever the immigration status of their parents.  By attacking U.S. citizens (many of whom just happen to be of Mexican ancestry), this Arizona proposal -- aimed at so-called "anchor babies" -- would amount to one of the most extreme anti-immigration measures in the last century.

What is going on in Arizona?  Have you no shame?

KJ

June 13, 2010 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

The Next Law & Order SVU? The Stokes Unit Tests Marriages!

Nina Bernstein of the New York Times offers us a glimpse of the "Stokes unit" of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office in New York City; the unit tests suspected sham marriages.  Is a new Law & Order franchise in the works?  It could be kind of juicy! 

KJ

June 13, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Orrick to Head OIL

Orrick

Main Justice reports that William H. Orrick has been named head the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Immigration Litigation (OIL), which, among other things, represents the U.S. government in immigration appeals in the U.S. courts of appeals.  The former head of the office, Juan Osuna, was recently named Associate Deputy Attorney General for Immigration Policy in Office of the Deputy Attorney General.

Orrick came to the Justice Department as a counselor to the Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division in June 2009 after 25 years at Coblentz, Patch, Duffy & Bass LLP.  Orrick is the son of former U.S. District Judge William H. Orrick Jr.

KJ

June 13, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Anti-Immigrant of the Day: Dana Rohrabacher

160px-DanaRohrabacher

Our Anti-Immigrant Advocate of the Day is U.S. Representative Dana Rohrabacher, a long time opponent of immigration and a staunch supporter of California's Proposition 187 in 1994 (which a court struck down as unconstitutional).  Most recently, Congressman Rohrabacher flew by helicopter to Catalina Island, off the coast of Los Angeles, to confront a Mexican official issuing identity cards that Mexican citizens may use to open bank accounts and cash checks. Rohrabacher claims that the identifications only help undocumented immigrants.  According to the Associated Press, many island residents saw his visit as grandstanding, portraying their community as a haven for illegal immigrants and unnecessarily drawing them into a raging immigration debate that could harm their tourist-dependent economy."  For more on this story, click here.  Rep. Rohrabacher's blog included a post on his actions.

KJ

June 13, 2010 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

From the North: Canadian Immigration Developments

Here is a new blog on Canadian Immigration Developments by Steven Meurrens, Associate at Larlee Rosenberg.

KJ 

June 13, 2010 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

From the Book Shelves -- Brain Gain: Rethinking U.S. Immigration Policy Darrell M. West, Brookings Institution Press, 2010.

On the new book Brain Gain:

 "To stay competitive, the United States must institute more of an open-door policy to attract unique talents from other nations. Yet Americans resist such a policy despite their own immigrant histories and the substantial social, economic, intellectual, and cultural benefits of welcoming newcomers. Why? In Brain Gain, Darrell West asserts that perception or `vision' is one reason reform in immigration policy is so politically difficult. Public discourse tends to emphasize the perceived negatives. Fear too often trumps optimism and reason. And democracy is messy, with policy principles that are often difficult to reconcile."

KJ

June 13, 2010 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)