Wednesday, February 7, 2007

A Danger to the U.S. Economy? The Treatment of Foreign (Business) Visitors

Daniel Gross identifies an oft-ignored threat to the U.S. economy -- the treatment of foreign visitors.  According to an article in The New Republic, "two-thirds of business travelers surveyed in a 2006 poll by the Discover America partnership, a coalition of travel-industry groups, called the United States "the worst country in the world" in its handling of foreign guests." Click here for more.

KJ

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

National Public Radio Questionairre

A journalist for the National Public Radio show "Marketplace" is reaching out to Spanish-speaking communities to find people interested in sharing their experiences to help them better cover the Latino economy in the US. They would like to hear from employers, employees, small business owners, professionals, bloggers, immigrants, non-immigrants, etc. Click here to go to questionairre Contact: Joellen Easton Public Insight Analyst Marketplace | Marketplace Money | Weekend America American Public Media jeaston@americanpublicmedia.org

KJ

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Fact Sheets on Naturalization and Border Arrests

NEW! FACT SHEET ON NATURALIZATION RATE ESTIMATES

The Office of Immigration Statistics (OIS) would like to announce the release of *Naturalization Rate Estimates: Stock vs. Flow*. This report compares stock and flow measures of naturalization and discusses why immigrant naturalization rates differ depending on the data source used. The PDF is available on the OIS website at:
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/ois_naturalizations_fs_2004.pdf

NEW! FACT SHEET ON BORDER APPREHENSIONS

OIS would like to announce the release of *Border Apprehensions: 2005*. This report provides information on recent trends in apprehensions and the gender, age, and geographic location of persons apprehended during 2005. The PDF is available on the OIS website at:
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/ois_apprehensions_fs_2004.pdf

HAVE YOU SEEN...

     *Immigration Enforcement Actions: 2005*
     http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/yearbook/2005/Enforcement_AR_05.pdf

     *2005 Yearbook of Immigration Statistics* in PDF format
     http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/yearbook/2005/OIS_2005_Yearbook.pdf

DID YOU KNOW...

Older editions of the *Yearbook of Immigration Statistics* back to 1996, including PDF files and Excel tables, are available on the OIS website at:
http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/statistics/publications/archive.shtm

JOIN THE LISTSERV

If you would like to receive these updates directly, send an e-mail with your name, mailing address, and organizational affiliation to immigrationstatistics@dhs.gov.

________________________________________

Office of Immigration Statistics
Department of Homeland Security
800 K Street, NW
10th Floor, Suite 1000
Washington, DC  20536
Phone: 202-786-9900

Visit the OIS website at:
http://www.dhs.gov/immigrationstatistics

bh

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Report on Immigrant Entrepreneurs

A new report by the Center for an Urban Future shows that immigrant entrepreneurs have become increasingly powerful economic engines for cities. The report, titled "A World of Opportunity: Understanding & Tapping the Economic Potential of Immigrant Entrepreneurs,” documents that immigrant entrepreneurs are starting a significant share of new businesses created in cities, stimulating growth in sectors from food manufacturing to health care, creating loads of new jobs and transforming once-sleepy neighborhoods into thriving commercial centers. The report focuses on the impact immigrant entrepreneurs are having—as well as the problems they encounter—in New York, Los Angeles, Houston and Boston. Click here to see the report. An article in the New York Times (here) featured the report.

KJ

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Anti-Border Vigilante Bill Dies in Arizona Desert

Arizona lawmakers refused on Monday to make criminals out of members of the Minuteman Civil Defense Corps and other armed groups patrolling the Mexican border. The vote to kill House Bill 2286 came after more than four hours of often-heated testimony and accusations over who was calling whom racists or vigilantes.  Click here for the story.

KJ

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Human Rights Abuses by Mexican Government, Report Says

Mexico's human rights agency has accused officials in Sonora of mistreating illegal Central American migrants, saying detainees were jammed into overcrowded cells and denied food and water for hours during a crackdown last year. The report comes as the Mexican government, under pressure from the United States, is ramping up efforts to catch thousands of foreigners passing through on their way to the U.S. border, and as migrant rights groups complain authorities are ill-equipped for the task.  Click here for the full story.

KJ

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

KKK on the Rebound; Immigrants Its Focus

The Ku Klux Klan, which just a few years ago seemed static or even moribund compared to other white supremacist movements such as neo-Nazis, experienced "a surprising and troubling resurgence" during the past year due to the successful exploitation of hot-button issues including immigration, gay marriage and urban crime, according to the Anti-Defamation League (ADL).   To see the ADL press release, as well as links to a recent report on the KKK's recent activities, click here.

KJ

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Iraq Refugee and Internally Displaced Persons Task Force

We previously had commented about how the war in Iraq had resulte in thousands of displaced people.  On February 5, 2007, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced the establishment of the Iraq Refugee and Internally Displaced Persons Task Force. Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky will lead this effort, building on support already provided, to coordinate refugee and IDP assistance to the region and refugee resettlement. The task force will also draw on the Department of State's multidisciplinary expertise to devise strategies for Iraqis at risk because of their work with the U.S. Government. Members of the Task Force include: Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration, Ellen Sauerbrey; Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs, David Welch; Senior Advisor to the Secretary and Coordinator for Iraq, David Satterfield; Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs Maura Harty; Director General of the Foreign Service and Director of Human Resources, George Staples; USAID Assistant Administrator for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance, Michael E. Hess; and USAID Acting Assistant Administrator for Asia and the Near East, Mark Ward. The task force will focus the State Department's coordination with other USG agencies, the UN, and other stakeholders. The work of the task force will also support the Department's participation in existing interagency processes run by the National Security Council.  Click here for the official statement from the State Department.

KJ

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Migration Policy Institute Launches New National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy

The Migration Policy Institute announced the creation of its new National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy. The Center will connect government agency administrators, researchers, community leaders, service providers, the media, and others who seek to understand and respond to the challenges and opportunities today’s high rates of immigration create in local communities. As part of the launch of the Center, MPI is also unveiling its electronic resource center, which provides online information and analysis across more than a dozen integration subfields, and a new, cutting-edge data tool that provides instant access to the most current demographic and social information on the foreign born in each state. In coming months, the electronic resource center will be built out to include more state-by-state research and analysis on key integration issues, and the state data tool will be expanded to include data on immigrant families’ language acquisition, workforce participation and income. The electronic resource center can be accessed through MPI’s website at www.migrationpolicy.org/integration. The state data tool, which is one of many offered by the new MPI Data Hub, can be accessed at http://www.migrationpolicy.org/datahub/. The launch also includes the release of an agenda-setting volume, Securing the Future: US Immigrant Integration Policy -- A Reader, in which top health, education and fiscal policy experts focus on trends in education, health, the workforce, citizenship, and the second generation. The authors also explore issues raised by proposed reforms to the U.S. immigration system, including impact aid to states and health care coverage for the foreign born. More information about the volume, including the Table of Contents, can be found at here.

KJ

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

The Defrauding of Immigrants by "Notarios"

On Monday, the Washington Post ran a story "Some Immigrants Duped by `notarios'" by Travis Loller (click here). It discusses a problem that has existed for quite a while but has received precious little attention. In much of Latin America, most notary publics are also lawyers. In the United States, a notary public is not a lawyer and cannot give legal advice; he can administer oaths and witness signatures, and that's it. The difference has allowed scam artists to prey on immigrants with limited English skills and little understanding of the American legal system by misrepresenting themselves as lawyers, immigration lawyers say.

A few years ago, law professor Pedro Malavet wrote several thoughtful articles about Latin American notarios that show their important roles in teh  legal systems of many Latin American countries.

KJ

February 7, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 6, 2007

Call for Papers

The Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies has put out a call for papers.  The Institute is hosting a conference on October 4-5, 2007 on the topic of "Multiculturalism, Pluralism and Globalization."  They describe the event as follows:

From ancient times to the present, people have sought to understand and create their identities both as individuals and as groups.  In so doing, they not only define who they are, but also who they are not.  What makes one group different from another?  Who defines those differences?  What are the consequences of such definitions? To what degree do these definitions create opportunities for conflict and for peace? And why do differences between groups so often lead to collective forms of violence such as war, genocide, terrorism and ethnic cleansing?

Possible topics include, but are not limited to: immigration and diasporas; "clash of civilizations"; diversity; definitions of community; economic class and property; race, ethnicity and language; nationalism and the nation; separatism, tolerance, and integration; identity politics; national or tribal membership and identity; ecologies of place or of culture; human rights, civil rights and natural law; religious/ethical values and identity; class, caste and gender; the sources of collective forms of violence.

The deadline for submissions, according to the website, is February 15.  More information, including contact information for submissions, is available on the Wisconsin Institute's website, linked here. 

-jmc

February 6, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Documentary on the Golden Venture

A powerful documentary chronicling the passage of Chinese immigrants to the United States:

A Journey into the American Immigration Nightmare

300 Chinese refugees seeking asylum were aboard the freighter Golden Venture when it ran aground off New York City in June, 1993.   The deaths and deportations that followed marked a crucial turning point in US immigration policy, ushering in a new era of legal and political restrictions.

The film premiered at the 2006 Tribeca Film Festival and also screened at the Amnesty International Festival.   The film has been shown at Princeton University and the Museum of Natural History in New York.   

Recognizing Golden Venture’s value for educators, the Library Journal wrote: "We feel for these immigrants, we want them to stay and find satisfying lives here, but we also see the concerns inherent in illegal immigration.  Highly recommended, especially for educational purposes."

Video Librarian also praised the film: "A compelling and timely portrait of human courage, resilience, and compassion, set against a backdrop of bigotry, fear, and political infighting, this is recommended."

You can learn more by going to www.goldenventuremovie.com, where there is also study material related to the Golden Venture and immigration policy.  The film can be ordered directly via New Day Films or by calling 888.367.9154.   For a 10% discount, please use promotional code TGNSBV.

bh

February 6, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Op-Ed Opposes Local Law Enforcement of Immigration

Rep. Glenn Donnelson thinks the feds are failing miserably at enforcing federal immigration laws, so he's taking the law into his own hands.
    The North Ogden Republican is pushing legislation that would force the Utah Department of Public Safety to train state officers to enforce the federal laws, while encouraging local law enforcement agencies to do the same.
    In reality, House Bill 105 would handcuff police officers in their efforts to ensure community safety. And we're not the only ones who think so.
    Chris Burbank, Salt Lake City police chief, says undocumented residents will be less likely to report crimes and cooperate with police if they fear they'll be deported.
    And Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff says simply: "The answer is to let the federal agents do their job and let us do our job in Utah." Click here for the rest of the editorial.

bh

February 6, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Commentary on the Detention Industry

"This Alien Life: Privatized Prisons for Immigrants" by Deepa Fernandes on CorpWatch discusses the growth of the private detention industry in the United States.  In particular, the article looks at the pervasive impact of the detention industry in the small town of Florence, Arizona.  In the wake of the September 11th attacks, the U.S. government invoked national security to sweep up and jail an unprecedented number of immigrants. Companies like Corrections Corporation of America and Wackenhut, have reaped the benefits.  However, the private detention industry was growing by leaps and bounds before 9/11.  The 1996 immigration reforms resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of immigrants sujject to detention.

Click here for the article.

KJ

February 6, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, February 5, 2007

Study -- Remittances to Mexico Increase by One-Quarter

The Houston Chronicle today ran a story reporting that Mexicans working abroad sent home a record $25 billion last year, most of it from the United States, according to a study released Friday. The estimated figure represents a 25 percent increase over 2005 and a nearly 80 percent surge since 2003, the Inter-American Development Bank, or IDB, said in its report.  Click here for the story.

KJ

February 5, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Migration From U.S. to India

The Boston Globe has an interesting article today about how the booming Indian economy and their treatment as outsiders in a foreign society has caused many Indian and other South Asian immigrants in the United States are returning to their homeland -- and bringing with them cutting-edge American skills.  Spurred by market reforms and a dynamic entrepreneurial class, India's once-sluggish economy has been growing by about 7 percent a year for the last decade, faster than every country in the world except China. Many salaries have almost doubled since 2005, as has the country's stock market index.   Click here for the story.

Thanks to George W for the news tip!

KJ

February 5, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

New Immigration Articles

Carter, Nate. Comment. Shocking the conscience of mankind: using international law to define "crimes involving moral turpitude" in immigration law. 10 Lewis & Clark L. Rev. 955-988 (2006).

Jontz, Laura. Note. Eighth Circuit to battered Kenyan: take a safari--battered immigrants face new barrrier when reporting domestic violence.(United States v. Maswai, 419 F.3d 822, 8th Cir. 2005.) 55 Drake L. Rev. 195-231 (2006).

Prescott, Natalie. Student article. Immigration reform fuels employment discrimination. 55 Drake L. Rev. 1-37 (2006).

Taking New Legal Realism to Transnational Issues and Institutions. Introduction by Bryant G. Garth; articles by Elizabeth Heger Boyle, Erika Busse and Sally Engle Merry. 31 Law & Soc. Inquiry 939-995 (2006).

KJ

February 5, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, February 4, 2007

Latino Elected President of the Harvard Law Review

Crespo_resized

This weekend, the editors of the Harvard Law Review elected Andrew Manuel Crespo President, the equivalent of editor in chief, of the Harvard Law Review.  Crespo, the Review's 121st president, was elected from a slate of five candidates.  A member of La Alianza, Harvard Law School's Latino student group, he is the first Latina/o President of the Harvard Law Review. 

According to the Harvard Crimson (here), Crespo's parents are Puerto Rican.  A native of Monroe, New York, he is a graduate of Harvard College (2005) with an A.B. in Social Studies. The Crimson reported that Crespo will make one of his top priorities to increase the diversity on the Law Review to improve outreach.

Presidential candidate Barack Obama was the first African American elected to President of the Harvard Law Review (1991).  His election was the subject of recent articles in the L.A. Times and N.Y. TimesSusan Estrich, an influential law professor at USC, was the first woman President of the Law Review (1978).

The Law Review, founded in 1887 by future Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, is an entirely student-edited journal with the largest circulation of any law journal in the world.

KJ

February 4, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Re-enacting Border Crossings

I have no idea what to conclude about a Mexican theme park -- Parque EcoAlberto -- that has people re-enact migrant border-crossing for recreation/education.  Maybe I need more information?  Patrick O'Guilfoil Healy of the New York Times writes in the travel section:

The idea of tourists’ aping illegal immigrants can seem crass, like Marie Antoinette playing peasant on the grounds of Versailles. But the guides describe the caminata as an homage to the path immigrants have beaten across the border. And the park’s approach to consciousness-raising is novel, but not completely unique. In 2000, the humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders set up a camp of tents, medical stations and latrines in Central Park to recreate the setting of a refugee camp. Last year, the refugee-camp project returned to New York and also traveled to Atlanta and Nashville.

The full Times story is here. It seems to me that the analogy to the refugee camp reenactment is imperfect.  The refugee camp re-enactment was meant to raise awareness of people in various U.S. cities who had probably not thought sufficiently about the plight of the world's numerous displaced persons.  But the migration reenactments seem (at least in this article) more like a Disneyfication of the migration process.  The participants seek amusement, and the article makes it clear that the reenactments paints a rosy picture of migration.  Moreover, by focusing on the physical -- and easily reenacted -- process of border crossing, the reenactments obviously do not attempt to educate the participants of the many and varied consequences of laws criminalizing migration.  In many ways, it is those larger lessons that are the more important lessons "about what [undocumented] immigrants go through." These reenactments seem to put border crossing in a practical and legal vacuum, and I'm just not sure how educational that could possibly be.

-jmc

February 4, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Indians in UK Challenge New Law

Affected by recent changes in British immigration laws, a forum representing over 30,000 skilled Indians will move the High Court here on Monday to seek judicial review of the new legislation.

Britain's new Highly Skilled Migrants Programme, which officially came into force on December 5, will force Indians and other non-EU personnel to leave the country because they no longer fit the highly-skilled migrant category.

Under the new rule, people above 28 and earning less than 35,000 pounds per annum will find it difficult to continue here.

The forum will seek review of the immigration laws in the High Court on the ground that the Home Ministry had unfairly gone back on its assurances. Click here.

bh

February 4, 2007 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)