Tuesday, June 6, 2017

UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Enjoys Ongoing US Support - Just Not From The President

The Earth does not have an unlimited ability to sustain its inhabitants.  President Trump either does not care or does not understand this urgency.

Ten governors have pledged to continue compliance with the 2015 Paris Agreement despite the announcement of recent US plans to withdraw.  The states have formed the bipartisan US  Climate Change Alliance.  The Alliance pledges to reach the goal of reducing greenhouse emissions by 26-28% of 2005 levels by 2025.  This would ensure compliance with the goals of the Clean Power Plan, a plan that is now under review per the order of the President.

The governors join mayors, companies and universities that have organized and plan to file reports with the UN in lieu of those typically filed by member national governments.  The collaborative was the idea of former NY Mayor Bloomberg who has pledged $15 million of his own money to the replace the US contribution that would have been made to fund the UN's costs in operating the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. 

Local US advocates have assumed leadership in the human rights movement.  This was a topic of discussion at the recent HR conference held at Columbia University.

 

 

 

 

 

June 6, 2017 in Environment, Margaret Drew | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 13, 2017

UN expert finds flawed consultation process for Dakota Access Pipeline

by Lauren Carasik

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On March 3, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, issued an End of Mission Statement, following her 10 day visit to the US to study the human rights situation the nation’s indigenous peoples, with a focus on energy development projects. She lamented the failure of the government to engage in meaningful consultations with tribes, concluding that "The legislative regime regulating consultation, while well intentioned, has failed to ensure effective and informed consultations with tribal governments. The breakdown of communication and lack of good faith in the review of federal projects leaves tribal governments unable to participate in dialogue with the United States on projects affecting their lands, territories, and resources."

The UN expert singled out the flawed process with respect to the Dakota Access Pipeline:

“Many indigenous peoples in the United States perceive a general lack of consideration of the future impacts on their lands in approving extractive industry projects in particular, and a lack of recognition that they face significant impacts from development of not just their own, but neighbouring resources as well. In the context of the Dakota Access Pipeline, the potentially affected tribes were denied access to information and excluded from consultations at the planning stage of the project. Furthermore, in a show of disregard for treaties and the federal trust responsibility, the Army Corps approved a draft environmental assessment regarding the pipeline that ignored the interests of the tribe… Although the final environmental assessment recognized the presence of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe five hundred meters away, it dismissed the risks to the reservation and failed to mention any of the other tribes that traditionally used the territory. Without an adequate social, cultural or environmental assessment, and the absence of meaningful consultation with or participation by the tribes, the Corps gave multiple domestic authorizations permitting the construction of DAPL.”

While she did recognize some positive steps towards indigenous sovereignty and self-determination, Tauli-Corpuz expressed deep concern over President Trump’s executive actions on the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines, and recommended “that for any extractive industry project affecting indigenous peoples, regardless of the status of the land, the United States should require a full environmental impact assessment of the project in consideration of the impact on indigenous peoples’ rights.”

In order to move forward, the UN expert emphasized the need for reconciliation:

“The issues surrounding energy development underscore the need for reconciliation with indigenous peoples in the United States. Tribal leaders and representatives indicate that they are interested in engaging in a program of reconciliation to remedy the harms they have faced and improve the government-to-government relationship going forward. Such a program would acknowledge the historical wrongs inflicted upon indigenous peoples in the United States and confront systemic barriers that prevent the full realization of indigenous peoples' rights.”

March 13, 2017 in Environment, Indigenous People, Lauren Carasik | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 15, 2016

Standing Rock Tribes and the IACHR

Standing Rock tribal members protesting the pipeline placement have petitioned the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.  According to a report on International Law Grrls, "The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, and Yankton Sioux Tribe, with Earthjustice and the American Indian Law Clinic – UC Boulder, submitted a Request for Precautionary Measures Pursuant to Article 25 of the IACHR Rules of Procedure Concerning Serious and Urgent Risks of Irreparable Harm Arising Out of Construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline to the IACHR."

Among the relief sought is a request to end state violence at the protest site and ensure the safety of those engaging in "peaceful prayer."  The Standing Rock website has information on the environmental and other issues as well as a link to the petition.  A copy of the petition may be found here.  

While the press was prompt in announcing that on December 4, the Army Corps or Engineers determined that it would not grant a permit for the pipeline route to include running underneath the local tribe's water supply, the connrection to the power of the tribes' IACHR  petition was not reported.

 

 

 

December 15, 2016 in Environment, Margaret Drew, Water | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, October 16, 2016

Hope for the Planet- Enhancing the Montreal Protocol

The 28th Meeting of the Parties (MOP 28) to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer met in Rwanda last week.  Among the discussion was the use and misuse Image1 of hydrofluorocarbons (HFC).    The related working group met immediately prior to the general meeting in order to write draft policy on HFC.  The use of HFC has environmental benefits.  Hydrofluorocarbons can substitute for chemicals that deplete the ozone layer.  Uncontrolled use of HFC leads to climate warming.  The meeting focused on ways to manage the use of HFC, which would prevent a rise in world temperature by more than half a degree Celsius by the end of the century.

On Saturday, 170 nations signed an agreement limiting the use of HFC in air conditioners and refrigerators. The agreement amends the Montreal Protocol, a pact agreed to so that unified actions could take steps to close the hole in the ozone layer.  At that time countries agreed to ban the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC). 

The agreement exemplifies the UN's best. Nations working together to create solutions. The agreement acknowledges that poorer nations will take longer to implement HFC reduction. And scientists say slow implementation is insufficient to avert some warming. None of that takes away from the fact that 170 countries acknowledged the seriousness of the warming crisis and acted together to help save our planet.

October 16, 2016 in Environment, Margaret Drew | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Standing Rock Sioux Seek UN Assistance

The Standing Rock Sioux and the International Indian Treaty Council opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline have asked four UN Special Rapporteurs to intervene to stop the work on the project.  According to a report in Indian Country Today, the groups cited  “ongoing threats and violations to the human rights of the Tribe, its members and its future generations.”  The urgent communication was submitted to UN Special Rapporteurs on the situation of human rights defenders, the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation, and Environment and Human Rights, as well as the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.  A more detailed description of the communication is available here.  Pipeline construction was halted pending resolution of a court proceeding, with the hearing now scheduled for September 8.

 

 

 

August 25, 2016 in Environment, Martha F. Davis, Native American | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 7, 2016

August Human Rights Conference -ICJSHR

On August 4th and 5th Vancouver will host the 18th International Conference on Justice, Security and Human Rights.

The conference has an impressive range of topics including science based presentations on Fish Stock Habitats, business enterprises addressed in Sustainable Entrepreneurship,and  Creating Shared Values,  medical approaches to Treating Diabetes;  and political topics such as Rights of Refugees and Promoting Gender Equality.

For more information, click here.

 

 

 

July 7, 2016 in Environment, Global Human Rights, Health | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 5, 2016

The Hidden Human Cost of the Flint Water Crisis

Imagine finding out that the contamination of your water was deliberate.  And the perpetrator was your local government.   Much more is at stake beyond the already significant physical health risks that the contamination brings.  Along with the potential, if not likely, short and long term health conditions the water brings, comes the knowledge that those on whom you rely for that element most critical to life cannot be relied upon.  

The residents of Flint are experiencing mental health problems as a direct consequence of the contamination.  In addition to the uncertainty of accessing safe water, residents experience isolation as friends and family stop visiting, reluctant to expose themselves and loved ones to the risks.  Children are experiencing anxiety resulting from exposure to frequent discussion of the crisis.  Some are experiencing guilt resulting from the inadvertent exposure of their children to the contaminated water.

Mental health counsellors have organized centers such as the Flint Community Resilience Group  to assist residents experiencing depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions. 

Michigan State University School of Social Work has a website updating the public on the crisis and available resources.

 

 

 

May 5, 2016 in Environment, Margaret Drew | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Ecojustice Poetry

By Lauren E. Bartlett

“Poetry has a lot to offer a world in crisis — and, in particular, in environmental crisis. For centuries, poets have given voice to our collective trauma: naming injustices, reclaiming stolen language, and offering us courage to imagine a more just world. In a world such as ours, poetry is an act of cultural resilience.” – Melissa Tuckey, “Introduction on Ecojustice Poetry”, Poetry Magazine, January 2016.

I want to gently urge you all to read the January 2016 issue of Poetry Magazine, which is dedicated to ecojustice poetry.   The human right to a healthy environment feels clear, alive, and magical when you are in the midst of reading these poems and prose.  Sitting in what seems to be the middle of this grey, frigid, winter landscape, finally arrived, I need Image1inspiration to put on the several layers of clothes required to walk outside, let alone inspiration to seek environmental justice for all.  While I have never thought of myself as a lover of poetry; it’s growing on me.  I appreciate the celebration of language, the oddity of content and structure, the imagery, and the freedom of poetry.  Also, I’m learning not to dwell on logic when reading poetry, which seems to be a good lesson for reading emails from my law students as well.

If you don’t know where to start or don’t have time to savor each and every poem, start with From “summer, somewhere” by Danez Smith, which more obviously than others touches directly on  race, environment and justice.  Maybe then read Crossing a City Highway by Yusef Komunyakaa to see the urban landscape come to life with its subtle references to severe environmental degradation.  And don’t miss Water Devil by Jamaal May, who makes me feel like I can reach out and grab the things he is describing. 

January 14, 2016 in Environment, Lauren Bartlett, writing | Permalink | Comments (0)

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