Tuesday, July 3, 2018

The Widening Empathy Gap

For decades those who consider the health of the nation have warned about the consequences of the widening gap between the rich and others.  Along with the disappearance of the middle class has come the disappearance of empathy.  Sense of community and willingness to help others has been replaced in many instances with an odd combination of beliefs.  Contemporaneously, many believe that each individual is responsible for his or her own situation, as if the resources of the universe are available to all equally and somehow looming poverty is the result of individual failure to grasp the brass ring.  Thrown into the mix is a smattering of distorted Christian biblical references used to justify whatever harsh policy or attitude promoted. Most recently, Attorney General Sessions quoted St. Paul in an effort to justify separating children from their parents at the border.  Many pastors denounced Sessions' use of scripture and pointed out that the passage was taken out of context.  It doesn't help that the cited passage was similarly used to support slavery which for generations entitled slave "owners" to practice family separation as a matter of right. 

Then I saw Won't You Be My Neighbor?  Fred Rogers foresaw the dangers of exposing children to violence and hatred.  He spoke of consequences of exposure to violent television.  Not only do our youth deal with violence on television and in movies, violence against students is a national fear with hyper-awareness of school shootings.  How we extend the message of love to children today is our challenge.  There is no Mr. Rogers to tell children that they are perfect just as they are. 

Perhaps we are asking the wrong questions when we consider policy, religion and resistance.  The right question is "What would Mr. Rogers Do?"

 

 

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/human_rights/2018/07/the-widening-empathy-gap.html

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