Sunday, May 6, 2018

Books, Prison and Protest: A Critical Human Rights Win

Having just completed my first Inside Out program with our local women's jail, I witnessed first hand the transformation that occurs when those who have been deprived of adequate education begin their journey to learning.  A 2013 RAND Corporation study affirmed what most suspected.  Education is key to reducing recidivism.  "Our meta-analytic findings provide additional support for the premise that receiving correctional education while incarcerated reduces an individual’s risk of recidivating after release."  The promotion of Inside-Out programs was one topic discussed recently by Pulitzer Prize winning Prof. James Forman at the AALS Clinical Section Conference. Forman is the author of Locking Up Our Own, which looks at the roots of mass incarceration.  Forman advocated for more college education classes in prisons and jails.

Receipt of books by those who are incarcerated is essential for continuation of "inside" self-education. But educational programs are not a priority, particularly for privatized prisons.  Everything from phone calls to Skype visits with children are available only to prisoners who pay.  Shortsighted is the most generous description I can attach to a recently announced policy that prisoners would no longer be able to receive books directly from distributors, except for one approved by the prison.  And those books would come with a 30% mark up.  

Family and friends of incarcerated men and women responded, as well as those inside, as well.  Coleman federal prison in Sumterville, FL was one that announced the new policy and that facility was the topic of advocacy efforts through national listserves and individual inquiry.  Then the policy was rescinded.

To the extent that the policy was a "test", the national grassroots response was sufficient to at least postpone its implementation.  

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/human_rights/2018/05/prisons-and-book-policies-a-modest-win-for-human-rights-advocates.html

Advocacy, Books and articles, Incarcerated, Margaret Drew | Permalink

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