Thursday, January 25, 2018

Helping Incarcerated Women and Girls

A study done by the Vera Institute found that women in jails are one of the fastest growing segments of the prison population.  And nearly 80% of women are mothers.  Women are an afterthought in the discussion of mass incarceration.  Little attention is given to the impact on families when a mother goes to jail.  And little is done to help families stay connected when mothers are incarcerated.  In a nationwide move, sheriffs and other jailers are replacing live child-mother visits with Skype visits.  Nothing replaces touch between parents and children.  Particularly young children are less likely to bond with a virtual parent.  And the incarcerated women are expected to pay for the Skype visits, making even virtual contact out of reach for many.

There are a myriad of discriminatory problems faced by women and girls in prison.  One other is the failure to provide menstrual products to them.  Some states charge for the products, and those who do not often distribute an average of 2.5 pads per month.

The National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls works to address the particular barriers that females face during and after incarceration.   From disparities in sentencing, to assisting with re-entry and healing, the National Council provides tremendous community based resources for the recently incarcerated and those currently incarcerated.  I recommend a visit to the Council's website for an introduction to the wide variety of work the Council does, as well as their sister organizations.

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/human_rights/2018/01/helping-incacerated-women-and-girls.html

Margaret Drew, Prisons, Race | Permalink

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