Monday, June 16, 2014

An outsider to help an outsider

I've blogged about Gianmarco Monsellato's admirable initiative to ensure that women lawyers in his large French law firm get equal pay and equal assignments as do their male counterparts.  

Monsellato believes that the popular American approach to form "diversity committees" and to "lean in" are absurd because the partners themselves have all the power and that genuine fairness must be initiated by them.  

A female CEO blogger for the Harvard Business Review Blog notes that those partners like Monsellato are themselves "outsiders" to their firms and that it might very well take such an outsider to implement serious changes: 

Interestingly, in my experience, most of the leaders who’ve pushed hardest for gender balance are themselves not fully members of their companies’ dominant majority. They are often a different nationality than most of their colleagues, or the first non-home- country CEO. So, for example, the Peruvian-born Carlos Ghosn at Nissan in Japan, the Dutch Marijn Dekkers at BAYER (disclosure: they are a client) in Germany, or the Italian Monsellato at TAJ in France.

There is nothing better than being a bit of an outsider to understand the particular stickiness of the in-group’s hold on power. These are some of the more enlightened leaders on gender balance. They build true meritocracies, they get the best of 100% of the global talent pool – and they will win a huge competitive edge in this century of globalization.

 

June 16, 2014 in Women lawyers, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 13, 2014

Hillary Clinton's Book Reviewed

In the Guardian UK

Sure, Clinton jokes in the book about scrunchies and outfits and nail polish to make her point that woman in public life are forced under a microscope. "There is a persistent double standard applied to women in politics," she writes, "regarding clothes, body types, and of course hairstyles."

But Clinton is still not ready to talk – at least not in a substantive way – about what it meant to be the first woman to go so far, yet still fall short, in the race for the 2008 Democratic nomination. And she is certainly not saying, in Hard Choices or in the rounds of interviews and appearances surrounding its release, how she would overcome biases on women seeking power when and if she decides to run in 2016.

It's about time she did.

June 13, 2014 in Theory, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

"Returnship" Programs for Women Re-entering Law Practice

From WashPost, Women and Work: Opt out or pushed out? The data.

In recent weeks, four law firms announced the first-ever, one-year “On Ramp” fellowships designed to help people — primarily women — who left the workforce to start families, care for aging parents or pursue other opportunities get back into the legal profession.

 

Baker Botts, Cooley, Hogan Lovells and Sidley Austin have chosen nine women out of a pool of 170. The women had been out of the workforce for between three and 20 years. Other “returnship” programs for women who’ve been sidelined have been offered at Goldman Sachs, Sara Lee, Credit Suisse and others. The BBC just ran a piece on the Credit Suisse program.

 

Some call women leaving the workforce in order to balance work and family life “opting out.” Social scientists who study workplace culture say it’s more like they were “pushed out” because workplaces require long, demanding hours of face time and see flexible or part-time work as almost a sign of weakness. And, unlike in other advanced economies, there are no policies or laws that give real support to working families.

June 10, 2014 in Women lawyers, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, June 7, 2014

MN Governor Signs Women's Economic Security Act

Minnesota Governor Signs Women's Economic Security Act

The Women’s Economic Security Act includes 9 pieces of legislation that address a variety of issues women face in the workplace. The act will work to narrow the compensation gap between men and women in Minnesota by requiring larger-sized businesses  that contract with the state at a certain amount to undergo a pay equity analysis and earn an “equal pay certificate.” The act also bans salary secrecy, doubles unpaid maternity leave time from 6 weeks to 12 weeks, creates more employment protections for nursing and pregnant women, and creates “safety leave” for those who need time off due to sexual assault, domestic violence, or stalking, among several other changes.

June 7, 2014 in Equal Employment, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 6, 2014

Gender Bias at UCLA's B-School

From the WSJ

And the accompanying text: 

One of the nation's top-ranked business schools is "inhospitable to women faculty," according to an internal academic review.

Faculty of the Anderson Graduate School of Management at University of California, Los Angeles, received a confidential copy of the review, conducted by a group of university professors and outside business-school deans, in April. The next day, the institution's first female dean, Judy Olian, met with the heads of several other elite business schools at the White House, where the group discussed business schools' roles in making workplaces friendlier to women and working families.

June 6, 2014 in Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 2, 2014

Choudhury on Gender Diversity

Barnali Choudhury, Queen Mary University, London, has uploded Gender Diversity on Boards: Beyond Quotas.  The abstract reads:  

Worldwide there is a growing interest in increasing the number of women on boards. While quotas have been proposed in many countries as a way to address this problem, several countries, including, Germany have rejected this approach. Nevertheless, it is apparent that change is needed as women continue to represent minorities on boards of some of the largest companies. 

Moreover, increasing the number of women on boards can be beneficial to firms. While it is not clear whether there is a positive relationship between increasing the number of women on boards and firm profitability, it is clearer that women make positive contributions to the board decision-making process. As a result, increasing the number of women on boards improves the quality of decisions made by the board. 

Given the benefits increased numbers of women on boards can produce for companies and countries’ lacklustre interest in quotas, this article canvasses methods by which boards can increase female representation without relying on quotas. As such, it looks to practices adopted by American football teams, Australian mentoring programs, and U.K. disclosure rules. It also examines existing workplace norms and practices which inhibit female labour participation. In doing so, it proposes alternative approaches by which Germany, and other countries can increase gender diversity on boards.

June 2, 2014 in Family, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

CA Bill Proposes to Insure Equal Education for Pregnant Grad Students

2013 Legis. Bill Hist. CA A.B. 2350 (May 14, 2014)

SUMMARY

This bill prohibits postsecondary education institutions from requiring a graduate student to take a leave of absence, withdraw from a graduate program, or limit his or her studies due to pregnancy or pregnancy-related issues. Specifically, this bill:

1) Requires institutions to reasonably accommodate pregnant graduate students so they may complete their graduate education programs.

2) Stipulates that an enrolled graduate student in good academic standing who chooses a leave of absence due to pregnancy, or who has recently given birth, shall return to her program in good academic standing following a leave period determined by the institution of up to two academic semesters, whichever is longer. A longer absence may be authorized for medical reasons.

3) Stipulates that a graduate student per (2) shall be allowed a period consistent with the institution's policies or 12 additional months, whichever is longer, to prepare for and take preliminary and qualifying examinations, and a 12-month extension toward the normative time to degree, unless a longer extension is medically necessary.

4) Requires every institution to have a written policy on pregnancy discrimination and procedures for Title IX pregnancy discrimination complaints and the name and contact information of the institution's Title IX compliance officer, and requires the policy to be made available to all students attending orientation sessions.

Basis for the proposed law?

1.  Because Title IX says so.

2.  To help get more women in STEM careers.

According to the University of California at Berkeley Law Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy (Institute), in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), preventing pregnancy discrimination is of utmost importance because women are not advancing in the field at the same rates as men, largely because of pregnancy and family concerns. The Institute finds that women now represent a large part of the talent pool for research science, but many data sources indicate that they are more likely than men to "leak" out of the pipeline in the sciences before obtaining tenure at a college or university. The Institute opines that Title IX protection is particularly vital for working students because Title IX also requires pregnancy leave for educational programs as well as the workplace.

 

May 20, 2014 in Education, Family, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Theorizing Billable Hours

Theresa Beiner (Arkansas-Little Rock) has published Theorizing Billable Hours, 75 Mont. L. Rev. 67 (2014).

This article looks at the ethical and diversity implications of high billable hour requirements. While corporate counsel have increasingly demanded a diverse legal workforce and emphasized the need to lower the costs of outside counsel, law firms have not responded to these concerns in a manner that is producing results. Instead, women continue to drop out of law firm practice at higher rates than their male counterparts and the costs of legal services remain high. High billable hour requirements exacerbate both these problems and have implications as well for ethical lawyering. Using data from a variety of disciplines, the article shows that not only do high billable hour requirements make large law firms difficult places for women to succeed, but they also foster work environments that are inefficient and therefore cost clients more. This has implications on a lawyer’s ethical duty not to discriminate based on sex and not to charge an unreasonable fee, and also increases the potential of lawyers making mistakes. Studies of lawyers suggest that high billable hour requirements exacerbate the difficulties women have in practice, especially for those women who have family responsibilities. This leads to high dropout rates from law firm practice that hurt both law firms and their clients. Lowering billable hours will increase the possibility that women will succeed in these workplaces while making lawyers more efficient. Using studies of sleep deprivation and sleep restriction, this article explores what clients are getting for their money from sleep-deprived high billable hour lawyers. It is clear that both sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction impair the average person’s ability to function on many levels—including neurocognitive performance that has important implications for lawyering. In addition, studies of workplace productivity have shown that limiting working hours can actually increase productivity. Thus, limiting hours logically should produce more efficient and ethical lawyering while making law firms more feasible work environments for women.

May 13, 2014 in Business, Women lawyers, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Prof Denied Tenure Because of Child-Care Leave

Lawsuit: Penn Denied Prof Tenure for Taking Child-Care Leave

A former history professor at the University of Pennsylvania is suing the school, claiming she was denied tenure because she took time off to have and care for her children.

 

Kristen Stromberg Childers, who taught at the Ivy League college from 2002 until 2010, contends in the federal discrimination lawsuit that her family-leave periods were the "determinative and motivating factors in the decision to deny tenure."

 

Childers took maternity leave during the 2003-2004 and 2007-2008 academic years for the births of her two children; she also took half-time, half-pay family leave in the 2008-2009 school year due to medical and educational issues her older child was having, the suit says.

 

She was denied tenure in February 2008 and again after submitting a new application in 2010.

 

Childers filed a grievance, and a panel in May 2011 found that the review process unfairly considered statements about the assistant professor's child-care leave in making its decision.

 

According to the lawsuit, the grievance panel found that the chairwoman of Penn's School of Arts and Sciences' personnel committee "inappropriately" wrote to the school's dean that "committee members found it especially hard to judge productivity in light of Dr. Stromberg Childers' family leave time and her junior leave." The dean later said in a letter that it was "difficult to give a balanced assessment" of the professor's productivity "because of the amount of family leave she has had."

 

May 1, 2014 in Education, Family, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 14, 2014

Gender gap in Texas law firms?

Story from Texas: 

....a Texas Lawbook study of 40 of the largest firms in the state shows that a serious gender gap continues to plague most law firms in Texas.

Only a small cadre of law firms have experienced extraordinary success promoting women to partner. A large majority of Texas firms continue to lag.

Nearly half of the law firms in the study (18 of 40) promoted no women or just one woman to partner in the last three years.

The number of women promoted to partner this year was up a modest 5 percent from a decade ago.

The rest of the story here.  

April 14, 2014 in Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

More laws or better enforcement?

A blog entry from Payscale:  

Women deserve equal pay for equal work. There are laws on the books dating back to 1963 that are designed to protect women from being paid less than men for doing the same work. However, we continue to see complaints, such as the one against the owners of Kay Jewelers and Jared, from allegedly underpaid female employees. Is the answer more laws, or more enforcement?

More: 

Employment and labor lawyer Gerald D. Skoning writes in The Palm Beach Post that the plethora of discussions about a "need" for more laws against gender discrimination and pay equity are missing the point. There are plenty of laws on the books designed to protect women from being paid less than men. The problem is that they aren't enforced.

Check out the rest here.  

April 14, 2014 in Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 11, 2014

The Arguments Against A Gender Wage Gap

As you know, the Democrats have been trying to close the gender wage gap while the Republicans have denied that such a gap exists, or that if it does, it doesn't merit legislative response at this time. 

Of course, there is nuance in the debate which doesn't get much discussion by either party in their respective political rheotric.  

Also interesting (to me) is how the GOP advocates try to justify the ostensive wage gap.  Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R-Kansas) said in a speech:  

"Please allow me to set the record straight. We strongly support equal pay for equal work, and I'm proud that I live in a country where it's illegal to discriminate in the workplace thanks to the Equal Pay Act of 1963 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964," said Jenkins. "Some folks don't understand that women have become an extremely valuable part of the workforce today on their own merit, not because the government mandated it."

Rep. Jenkins couches her arguments in the style of good old fashioned liberalism (women are men's equals and should be treated that way), rather than conservative ideals about women belonging in the home (admittedly, that sort of argument would have been weird for her to offer, given her own terrific success as an elected official).    

I don't mean to imply that the GOP has a better argument than the Dems, but that both sides seem to be drawing from the same general vocabulary of liberal equality, something that surprises me a bit.  

April 11, 2014 in Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Study Finds More Stay at Home Moms

From NPR, In Turnaround, More Moms are Staying Home, Study Says

After decades on the decline, the number of "stay at home" moms in the U.S. has risen, with 29 percent of women with children under 18 saying they don't work outside the home, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center.

 

The figure from 2012 is up from 23 percent in 1999.

Mothers With Children Who Don't Work Outside The Home:

1967 — 49 percent

1999 — 23 percent

2012 — 29 percent

 

"The recent turnaround appears to be driven by a mix of demographic, economic and societal factors, including rising immigration as well as a downturn in women's labor force participation," the Pew study finds.

 

"Stay at home" mothers includes women who remain in the home to care for family as well as those who say they don't work outside because they are unable to find work, are disabled or enrolled in school

April 10, 2014 in Family, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Transparency in Hiring of Women Employees

Tracy has already posted on this topic.  A bit more from the New Republic:  

President Obama on Tuesday is expected to sign two executive orders that will address the pay disparity between women and men. One will bar federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about their pay with each other. The other will require businesses to hand over data on pay, broken down by race and gender, to the Labor Department. The goal of both steps is to increase transparency, which is more important than it may sound. It’s hard to fight pay discrimination if you don’t even know what other people make.

And:  

That’s exactly what happened to Lilly Ledbetter, for whom the Lilly Ledbetter Act is named. She didn’t find out she was being paid less than the men around her until 19 years after she started at Goodyear. Even then, it was thanks only to an anonymous note. While President Obama has touted the fact that his first act as president was to sign that bill, it was a very, very incremental step toward gender wage parity. The law merely gives women more time to bring suits. The wage gap actually widened a bitafterward. Today, women who work full-time, year-round still make 77 percent of what similar men make, and progress has all but stalled for a decade.

April 9, 2014 in Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

You're Doing it Wrong: The Parenting Part of the Work/Life Equation

There has been a flurry of focus on the overwhelming nature of work/life balance.  E.g., Overwhelmed: Work, Love and Play When No One Has the TimeI Refuse to Be Busy. The second shift of housework, the reification of an organic Betty Crocker, and male norms of ideal workers all combine to stress and fundamentally impair a happy and mindful life.  Something's got to give.  Opt-out? Out source ? Or maybe we can just ease up on the uber-parenting.  

So suggests this article in the Atlantic Don't Help Your Kids with Their Homework.  Some key take-aways of "essentially useless parenting interventions" based on the sociological research:

  • Helping kids with homework.  Especially from middle school on, it can actually hurt them
  • Meeting with teachers and principals
  • Observing a kid’s class
  • Volunteering at schools
  • Bake sales  
  • Helping a teenager choose high-school courses
  • Disciplinary measures such as punishing kids for getting bad grades or instituting strict rules about when and how homework gets done.

The things that do seem to matter? 

  •  Reading to your child when they are young
  •  Talking to your teen about college options
  • Getting your child placed with a good teacher
  • Surrounding kids with colleged-educated adults with interesting careers
  • Encouraging kids to ask critical questions and advocate for themselves

 

April 8, 2014 in Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, March 22, 2014

The Simple Truth on the Gender Pay Gap

Though nothing's simple, AAUW provides more detail in The Simple Truth About the Gender Pay Gap.

You’ve probably heard that men are paid more than women are paid over their lifetimes. But what does that mean? Are women paid less because they choose lower-paying jobs? Is it because more women work part time than men do? Or is it because women tend to be the primary caregivers for their children?

AAUW’s The Simple Truth about the Gender Pay Gap succinctly addresses these issues by going beyond the widely reported 77 percent statistic. The report explains the pay gap in the United States; how it affects women of all ages, races, and education levels; and what you can do to close it.

March 22, 2014 in Equal Employment, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

"Hetero-Bias" Lawsuit

Perhaps the story could have originated only from a preppy New York City day school.  

A highbrow Manhattan prep school is getting down and dirty to fight a former employee who claims he was fired for being straight.

The Trinity School on the Upper West Side called ousted coach Gregory Kenney a two-timing cad after he alleged in a lawsuit that he was fired by lesbian boss Pat Krieger in 2012 because he’s heterosexual.

But: 

School officials insist that Kenney wasn’t ostracized for his traditional lifestyle. But they don’t let things lie there.

In court papers filed last month in response to the teacher’s Manhattan civil suit, they say Kenney’s colleagues “overheard him lying to his wife about staying late for work events, only to attend bars with other women who were not his wife.”

March 5, 2014 in Equal Employment, LGBT, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, March 1, 2014

The Lean In Antidote

In WaPo, from Rosa Brooks (Georgetown), Recline, don't Lean In:

I had an epiphany the other day. I was in the middle of marking up a memo on U.S. drone policy while simultaneously ordering a custom-decorated cake for my daughter’s sixth grade musical cast party and planning my remarks for a roundtable on women in national security.

 

Suddenly, it hit me: I hate Sheryl Sandberg....Sheryl, have you ever stopped to consider that all this “leaning in” is ruining life for the rest of us?

March 1, 2014 in Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)