Saturday, July 26, 2014

Women Disproportionately Deal with the Realities of Hunger

Slate, Hunger's Disproportionate Effect on Women

[T]he task of feeding children on an inadequate budget falls primarily to women. That women still do the majority of household labor is well known, but usually it’s discussed in the context of middle-class obsessions like leaning in and the mommy wars, not in the context of growing poverty.

 

McMillan shows just how heavily domestic duties weigh on food-insecure women—both the practical and menial labor of getting dinner on the table, and also the emotional labor required to negotiate with hungry kids. 

July 26, 2014 in Family, Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

The Return of the Welfare Queen

Michele Gillman (Baltimore) has posted The Return of the Welfare Queen, 22 American J. Gender, Social Policy & Law (forthcoming).

  • The “welfare queen” was shorthand for a lazy woman of color, with numerous children she cannot support, who is cheating taxpayers by abusing the system to collect government assistance.
  • The good news is that dependency rhetoric did not work and may have backfired.
  • The bad news is that the welfare queen still lurks behind repeated calls to cut government benefits and to criminalize poverty.
  • This article explores the legacy of the welfare queen, her return in the 2012 presidential campaign, and the current inadequacies of TANF. The article concludes with suggestions to reform TANF in the hopes of burying the welfare queen once and for all

May 13, 2014 in Gender, Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Legal Reform for Women in Poverty

Jill Engle (Penn State), Promoting the General Welfare: Legal Reform to Lift Women and Children in the US Out of Poverty, 16 Journal of Gender, Race and Justice (2013).

American women and children have been poor in exponentially greater numbers than men for decades. The problem has historic, institutional roots which provide a backdrop for this article’s introduction. English and early U.S. legal systems mandated a lesser economic status for women. Despite numerous legal changes aimed at combating the financial disadvantage of American women and children, the problem is worsening. American female workers, many in low-paying job sectors, earn roughly twenty percent less than their male counterparts. Nearly forty percent of single mothers and their children subsist below the poverty level. The recession exacerbated this problem, mostly because unemployment rates skyrocketed and then stagnated for years. Sadly, though, many women with jobs still find themselves living in poverty in modern America. Social trends loom large in the constellation of factors impacting poverty as well, and this article examines the twin phenomena of women and children 1) ending up poorer after divorce than men, and 2) living in poverty as single-headed-households much more often than men. I also stress the deleterious effects of domestic violence and its link to the perpetuation of women and children in poverty.

 

I argue our legal system is equipped to build the scaffolding to facilitate our collective climb up and out. I advocate changes to government policies, and family law reform. Recent changes to federal benefits programs have exacerbated the problem of women and children living in poverty. Welfare reform and “domestic violence” provide a natural segue between the article’s two main sections. Modern family law developments such as no-fault divorce and the attendant decline of alimony are also analyzed.

 

May 1, 2014 in Family, Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Obama Urges Raise in Minimum Wage for Tipped Workers to help Low-Income Women

From Reuters, White House Urges Higher Pay for Tipped Workers

The White House said on Wednesday raising the minimum wage for workers who receive tips would disproportionately benefit low-income women and help close the gender pay gap in which men earn higher pay than women.

The federal minimum wage for workers who receive tips is $2.13 an hour - well below the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Even though employers are required to make up any shortfall between the tipped minimum and the standard minimum if gratuities fall short, one in 10 workers earn less than the minimum wage, the White House said.

"This provision is difficult to enforce," the White House Council of Economic Advisers said in a report. The president has asked Congress for an 18 percent, $41 million increase in funding for Department of Labor Wage and Hour division investigators to hold employers to the law.

March 29, 2014 in Equal Employment, Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

more leisure time for men?

According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, men apparently have more leisure time than do women.  

“In virtually every country, men are able to fit in valuable extra minutes of leisure each day while women spend more time doing unpaid housework,” according to the OECD. But the sharper point was that gender inequality is most stark in India, where the average man spends just 19 minutes a day on “routine housework” and the average woman spends almost five hours on such duties.

Of course, stats must be taken with some qualification and skepticism.  Somehow the claim that there is more leisure time for men seems apt for those who can afford not to work.  There is this to consider as well: 

Millions of Indian men do huge amounts of housework — but in single-man or all-male households. Three years ago, I spent a few weeks in Mumbai interviewing dozens of auto rickshaw drivers for a long essay about their lives. An overwhelming majority of them lived in all-male households, often sharing a single room and cooking for one another. It’s not just them. Millions of poor and lower-middle-class Indian men leave behind their villages and families every year to work in cities as daily wage laborers, construction workers, auto rickshaw or taxi drivers, security guards, fruit or vegetable sellers, waiters or domestics, transferring the small surplus incomes of their city lives into economic security for all of their dependents back in the village.

Such a man runs his own household expertly and sometimes with evident pleasure, shopping, chopping, cooking and cleaning at high speed, being ribbed by his mates all the while. On his annual visit back to the village, though, he puts his feet up and doesn’t do even the 20 minutes of routine housework that would make him above average.

March 26, 2014 in Manliness, Masculinities, Poverty, Race | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The Lack of Lawyers and Access to Justice

This is an important piece of the puzzle over the future demand for lawyers.  It's not just about what Wall St. is willing to pay for lawyers.  There still is tremendous need for lawyers particularly in cases of family matters, landlord tenant, immigration, and cases with poor and minority plaintiffs.  Such need that, as the article suggests, it constitutes an access to justice issue, if not an international human rights issue. 

March 11, 2014 in International, Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0)