Friday, March 13, 2015

Curt Schilling--A Father's Grief

From Huff Post:

The single most disturbing story coming out of the media and sports world last week was the horrific online abuse levied at Gabby Schilling, daughter of former Red Sox pitcher, Curt Schilling.

The story was first reported by Schilling on his 38 Pitches Blog.

Curt's daughter Gabby is also a pitcher, and they found out last week that she was accepted to Salve Regina University, where she will play softball.

Proud father Curt, who is active on social media and particularly on Twitter (@gehrig38) posted a Tweet that read "Congrats to Gabby Schilling who will pitch for the Salve Regina Seahawks next year!!"

 But trolls started to attack Schilling: 

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♦◊♦

I post those Tweets here not to be sensationalistic, but because they have to be seen to understand how deeply and viscerally disturbing they are.

March 13, 2015 in Family, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Single-Gender Schools Considered in Virginia

The story:

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools is considering offering single-gender schools as a magnet program parents could apply for. The concept is one of several new themes the school district is exploring as CMS turns its eye on its magnet programs. 

Single-gender classrooms have grown in popularity over the past 15 years as federal rule changes have made them easier to execute. Supporters point to numerous studies showing that girls and boys learn in different ways, and that teachers respond to them differently.

But the evidence is not concrete on whether single-gender education offers a measurable benefit, according to research highlighted by the National Education Association.

March 11, 2015 in Education, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

LGBT as Physical Disability

An Irish Catholic bishop said on Monday that homosexuality — like Down’s syndrome or spina bifida — was not part of God’s plan, and that same-sex couples with children were “not necessarily parents.” In an interview with the NewsTalk Breakfast radio program, Elphin Bishop Kevin Doran argued that voters should reject an upcoming referendum to legalize same-sex marriage because LGBT couples could not procreate.

Hear the interview here (scroll down to bottom).  

March 11, 2015 in Family, LGBT, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0)

"Another Anti-LGBT Bill Introduced in Utah Legislature"

Thus runs the headline from a post by the HRC:

Today, Utah legislature introduced yet another anti-LGBT bill, this time targeting school discussions around sexuality.

The “Protections on Parental Guidance in Public Schools” bill would require a school to obtain written consent from a student’s parents before exposing students to “any course material” or “discussing” a number of topics, including “sexuality,” “marriage,” “pregnancy,” and “child birth.”

HB 447 comes on the heels of the dangerous SB 297, a poison pill targeting religious minorities, racial minorities and LGBT people introduced just four days ago.  

HRC is proud to stand in support of Equality Utah and the ACLU of Utah in opposition to these bills.

 

 

March 11, 2015 in Education, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

In Search of a Better Vocabulary for "Stay-at-Home Moms"

I'm working on a final chapter of a book on 19th century feminism and family law. In concluding and drawing some parallels to modern times, I find myself searching for better words to use for the "stay-at-home" mom. 

The 1950s term is mostly "housewife." Slate suggested we should reclaim the term "homemaker."

Certainly these three options present interesting contrasts between emphasis on the primary role as mom, wife, or home. But they all seem problematic, as noted and also here.

What other terms have been used over time?  

What other terms could we be using?  "Domestic goddess" seems popular on Facebook. "Domestic engineer"? It seems there must be better terminology to both describe and respect this role.   

 

 

March 10, 2015 in Family | Permalink | Comments (0)

OutCrit Pedagogy in the Classroom

Sheila I. Velez Martinez (Pitt), Towards an Outcrit Pedagogy of Anti-Subordination in the Classroom, 90 Chicago-Kent L. Rev. 589 (2015).

  • OutCrit positionality is framed around the need to confront in collective and coordinated ways the mutually‐reinforcing tenets and effects of two sociological macro‐structures that currently operate both domestically and internationally: Euroheteropatriarchy and neoliberal globalization. Therefore, among them are the legal scholars who in recent times have pioneered the various strands of outsider critical jurisprudence.                                                                                                      
  • I propose that using formal or traditional legal education pedagogy is itself a contradiction of anti‐subordination principles, inasmuch as traditional pedagogy is inherently hierarchical and validates euroheteropatriarchal perspectives. My critique to the use of the traditional course book pedagogies can be summed up as follows: (1) It ignores best practices in teaching and critical pedagogy; (2) Because of that, it is not only a poor educational tool for most students but also has a particular oppressive effect in female students and students of color.                                                                                                                                
  • This paper seeks to offer a theoretical basis to elaborate future practices that can help build a more democratic and inclusive classroom. In particular, I propose that we have to forgo au‐ thority as the basis of the teacher‐student relationship. Forgoing au‐ thority means finding a new basis for the relationship: collaboration. This includes collaboration in the production of knowledge.

March 10, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

What if...There Were More Women in Congress?

WaPo, What Would Change if there Were More Women in Congress? More than you Think.

For one, women are more likely than men to advocate for issues often associated with women’s interests — child care, women’s health, abortion, pay equity and the like. There are many studies, but see Michele Swers’s two books to start with. This shows up, for example, in in floor speeches and legislative debates, where women are more likely to discuss issues in terms of women’s interests. (Women are also more likely than men to give floor speeches, period.)

 

Via e-mail, Swers noted some of the recent examples — such as how Democratic Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand (N.Y.) and Claire McCaskill (Mo.) have focused on sexual harassment in the military (albeit with differing points of view), or how Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) pushed the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.

March 10, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 9, 2015

SUNY Stony Brook has a Center for Men's Studies

The website is here. Here are the Center's Mission Statement and Vision Statement: 

Mission

The Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities, established at Stony Brook University (SUNY) in 2013, is dedicated to engaged interdisciplinary research on boys, men, masculinities, and gender. Our mission is to bring together researchers, practitioners, and activists in conversation and collaboration to develop and enhance projects focusing on boys and men. This collaboration will generate and disseminate research that redefines gender relations to foster greater social justice.

Vision

The Center is committed to fostering a world in which everyone, regardless of race, gender, or sexuality, reach their full potential as human beings. We support and promote research that furthers the development of boys and men in the service of healthy masculinities and greater gender equality. We seek to build bridges among a new generation of researchers, practitioners, and activists who work toward these ends. This unique collaboration will enhance the quality and impact of research, and enable a more informed policy and practice.

And some editorial comments about the Center is here on the website of the American Men's Studies Association.  

March 9, 2015 in Education, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

"Will women's gains be sold out in Taliban peace deal?"

From Aljazeera:

As March 8 falls on what is rumoured to be the eve of the first round of negotiations between the Afghan government and the Taliban, Afghan women's rights activists were anxiously anticipating unadulterated assurances from Ghani to the effect that women's achievements will not be compromised in an eventual peace deal. Afghan women demand greater say in politics Though Ghani never directly mentioned the talks, Chief Executive Officer Abdullah Abdullah's message read in his absence clearly stated that the government will present a red line on women's rights and will not compromise Afghan women's achievements in exchange for a peace deal.

Some women's rights groups, including the Afghan Women's Charter, have requested that at least one woman be included in the government's team of negotiators. They have further demanded that belief in women's rights be part of the criteria for selecting male negotiators.

Women's angst stems from a quivering political will that the Afghan political leadership has demonstrated in the past decade on the issue of women's rights and status in this male-dominated society. Afghan women, as determined and talented as they are, could not have achieved their gains of the last decade had it not been for the international community's presence and pressure on Afghan political leaders.

March 9, 2015 in International, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, March 7, 2015

Law School Accused of Mishandling Rape Investigation

Law Student Accuses University of San Diego for Mishandling Rape Investigation

A University of San Diego law student has filed a lawsuit against the school, claiming college officials discouraged her from reporting an alleged rape by two fellow students.

 

The U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights is investigating how the college handled reports of the same incident.

 

The lawsuit, filed Feb. 13, says the 29-year-old woman was raped by two men in the bathroom at an off-campus party in May 2013. The woman told NBC 7 she did not immediately report the incident to police because she was afraid.

 

"It's horrifying and stigmatizing. I didn't want to be that girl that got raped. Nobody does," she said.

 

But when she discovered one of her alleged attackers was in her evidence class the next fall semester, she informed her professor.

 

March 7, 2015 in Law schools, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Understanding Intersexuality in the Workplace

Julie Greenberg (Thomas Jefferson), Interacting in the Workplace with Individuals Who Have an Intersex Condition, Bloomberg BNA

This chapter explores societal assumptions about sex and gender. It begins with an introduction to intersexuality and compares intersexuality to transgenderism and sexual orientation. It then discusses the most pressing issues facing the intersex community and compares them to the concerns of people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT). It next examines how the law affects people in the intersex community. Finally, it concludes with advice for employment lawyers and human resource managers about how to address issues that may arise in the workplace involving people with an intersex condition.

March 7, 2015 in Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, March 6, 2015

NYT Editorial on Alabama

An excerpt:

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — ON Tuesday the Supreme Court of Alabama prohibited the state’s probate judges from issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. This decision effectively throws down the gauntlet, challenging the federal courts to make earlier federal rulings stick — including last month’s refusal by the United States Supreme Court to stay a federal judge’sdecision requiring the state to recognize same-sex marriages. It draws on a disturbing line of thinking in the history of American federalism, one that, were it to gain currency as a model, could compromise our entire system of law.

 

March 6, 2015 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

The Latest Issue of the Harvard J of Law & Gender

Harvard Journal of Law and Gender

The latest volume focuses entirely on the Hobby Lobby case and its issues of reproductive freedom and religious freedom.  

March 6, 2015 in Religion, Reproductive Rights | Permalink | Comments (0)

Florida's Transgender Bill

The story is from three days ago:

Today is the first day of the state legislative session in Tallahassee and already mean-spirited, anti-transgender legislation has been put on the calendar for a vote.

The Transgender Discrimination Bill, H.B. 583, seeks to criminalize transgender people by making it illegal for them to enter sex-segregated facilities such as bathrooms, locker rooms, or dressing rooms. H.B. 583 would also compel businesses to discriminate against their own employees and customers, and invalidate nondiscrimination policies that already exist on the local level.

 

 

March 6, 2015 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Gender Equality in Immigration Law

Mariela Oliveras (Howard), Unreformed: Towards Gender Equality in Immigration Law, Chapman L. Rev. (2015).

From the Abstract:

This Article advocates for comprehensive immigration reform that encompasses gender equality by including legislative provisions that benefit women. In this way, immigration law and policy can ameliorate the discriminatory effects of the explicit and implicit oppression against women that has characterized immigration law from its beginning. 

Part I provides a basis to understand this legacy of oppression by exploring the subordination of women in immigration law. Since its inception as formalized federal law, immigration law has restricted the manner in which immigrant women could come to the United States and the type of immigration status benefits for which they could be eligible. Building on this historical foundation, Part II discusses the current state of immigration reform and comments on the continued oppressive measures that have infiltrated these proposals. Even though comprehensive legislative immigration reform remains elusive, this Part discusses a piece of proposed legislation that passed the Senate, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 20132 (“2013 Border Security Bill”). While the political process has likely stalled the chance of law reform passing in the current congressional session, the 2013 Border Security Bill serves as an illustrative case study in understanding current legislative trends and how they continue to disadvantage women. This Article concludes by discussing the feasibility and efficacy of a continued push for gender equality in immigration law and policy, given the environment of heightened anti-immigrant animus. Though change may be difficult to obtain, the history of immigration law teaches that the law has evolved to encompass more gender-neutral norms. Thus, equality will be achieved only through vigilant, unceasing efforts.

March 5, 2015 in International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Book Review: Black Women, Mothering and the Academy

Nicole TruesdellMotherhood in the Ivory Tower

Nzinga-Johnson, Sekile.  Laboring Positions. Black Women, Mothering and the Academy.   2013. Demeter Press: Ontario

 

When I offered to review Nzinga-Johnson’s 2013 edited volume on Black women and mothering in the academy I felt compelled to do so as I needed to read something that directly addressed the intersections of my identity as a Black woman, recent mother, professor and administrator.  Recent books about women being mothers in the academy have privileged a worker/mother dichotomy that tends to elevate the “worker” identity above that of the mother. This divide did not speak to neither my colleagues of color’s nor my experiences after becoming mothers and performing more care-related work (mentoring, community building, activism) on our college and university campuses.  I know that as a working Black mother in the academy my story is not unique, but it is one that if often unheard, under valued, and silenced within the halls of the ivory tower.

 

That silence is being undone with the publication of Nzinga-Johnson’s 2013 edited volume: Laboring Positions: Black Women, Mothering and the Academy.  The fourteen articles in this edited volume speak to the various experiences of Black women, Black mothers, and mothering/care work done in the academy.  Using a variety of methods and disciplinary perspectives, Laboring Positions is grounded overall in Black and intersectional feminist understandings of mothering/motherhood. 

March 5, 2015 in Books, Race | Permalink | Comments (0)

Fammigration

You can come, but you can't leave.

Domestic Violence Survivor Found Guilty of Abduction for Fleeing with Daughter, May be Deported

A unanimous jury found Korean immigrant detainee and domestic violence survivor Nan-Hui Jo guilty Tuesday of child abduction charges filed by her child’s father and alleged abuser, Jesse Charlton. Now, Nan-Hui is also facing deportation and permanent separation from her child immediately after the hearing.

 

Nan-Hui Jo fled the U.S. to South Korea in 2009 with her then one-year-old daughter Vitz Da (known as Hwi) to escape abuse by Vitz Da’s American father Charlton, an unstable Iraq war veteran diagnosed with PTSD. For years, Nan-Hui raised her daughter in Korea during which time Charlton, unbeknownst to Nan-Hui, filed child abduction charges against her. When Nan-Hui traveled to Hawaii last summer to consider schools for the American-born Hwi and perhaps re-connect her daughter with Charlton if it was safe, she was immediately arrested and sent to jail.

Compare Federal Court Blocks Government From Locking Up Mothers and Children Fleeing Violence

On Friday, a federal court temporarily halted the Obama administration’s policy of detaining migrant mothers with children seeking asylum in the United States.

 

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed a lawsuit in December alleging that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) locked up women with children who were seeking asylum under their new “no release” policy, often inprison-like conditions for months at a time. The policy was adopted as part of the Obama administration’s “aggressive deterrence strategy” in response to the influx of Latin American migrants who crossed the southern border last year, as a way to deter future migrants from making the trek. The ACLU stated that in years past, detainees who were able to express “credible fear” that they would be persecuted in their homelands were released on bond or on their own recognizance.

 

March 5, 2015 in Family, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

"Quotas for Women on Corporate Boards"

Irene Velkova, University College London, has uploaded "Quotas for Women on Corporate Boards: The Challenge for Europe." The abstract reads:

“Bringing more women on boards is not just the right thing to do. More women on boards is the bright thing to do!”, argues Viviane Reding, the Vice-President of the European Commission and Commissioner for Justice, Fundamental Rights and Citizenship in 2009-2014 when promoting European Union quota law. And then she adds: “…I do not like them (quotas) either. But I like the results they bring.” 

The debate for higher female representation on corporate boards has become particularly intensive during the recent financial crisis. Scholars advocate that women are more risk-averse, more engaged with longer-term issues and tend to draw more attention to governance and ethics. Thus, it is suggested that due to the behavioural differences between men and women, more gender – balanced boards would have prevented a number of financial collapses. This assertion has triggered more detailed analyses of current statistics for women on boards in the European Union. The numbers that are found follow the global pattern. Women are well underrepresented on boards and even less visible as CEOs or chairpersons of companies. In particular, at the end of 2013 women held 17.8% of the seats on boards in Europe, 16.6% in the US, 12.3% in Canada, 12.3% in Australia and 17.1% in South Africa. Women serve as chairpersons on 3.2% of the biggest companies in Europe , 3.1% in the US, 4.2% in Canada, 3% in Australia and 5.5% in South Africa. The country in the world that excels with the highest number of female directors on boards is Norway, which has achieved 42% women on boards by 2013. These strikingly low ratios and the general finding in the empirical literature that women bring positive change to firms’ performance have generated a phenomenal drive for promoting initiatives that strive to increase the number of women on boards.

 

March 4, 2015 in Scholarship, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

"Facebook Adds New Gender Option for Users: Fill in the Blank"

The story:

Facebook users who don't fit any of the 58 gender identity options offered by the social media giant are now being given a rather big 59th option: fill in the blank.

"Now, if you do not identify with the pre-populated list of gender identities, you are able to add your own," said a Facebook announcement published online Thursday morning and shared in advance with The Associated Press.

Facebook software engineer Ari Chivukula, who identifies as transgender and was part of the team that made the free-form option, thinks the change will lead to more widespread acceptance of people who don't identify themselves as a man or woman.

"We're hoping this will open up the dialogue," Chivukula said.

 

 

March 4, 2015 in Gender, LGBT, Technology | Permalink | Comments (0)

Gender Neutral Shoes

NiK Kacy, luxury footwear designed to fit all genders.'s video poster

 

From HuffPost

As mainstream understandings of bodies and identity evolve and change, it's only fitting that industries, such as fashion, evolve too.

That's the case with NiK Kacy, one of the first luxury footwear brands to describe their product as gender-neutral. At HuffPost Gay Voices we've been documenting the shifting nature of queerness within the fashion world through our series"FABRICATIONS: Emerging Queer Faces of Fashion Design." The NiK Kacy brand is certainly emblematic of this shift and an exciting prospect for bodies existing outside of binary understandings of gender.

NiK Kacy is currently engaged in a Kickstarter campaign in order to fund the brand's first line. The Huffington Post chatted with Kacy this week about their vision for this footwear line, as well as its cultural significance.

 

March 4, 2015 in LGBT, Manliness, Masculinities, Theory | Permalink | Comments (0)